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Why You Need a College Degree

Why You Need a College DegreeEducated workers are becoming increasingly valuable for two reasons: Many lower-skilled jobs are being shipped overseas, and computers do much of the mundane, repetitive work now. What’s left are more complex tasks that require people to solve problems and work together, according to Tony Carnevale, director of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce.

“Skills that used to be reserved for senior technical people or managers are more and more required” of everyone, says Carnevale. “It’s less a matter of standing in front of a machine and doing the same thing over and over again” and more about “exploiting the machine, interacting with customers and interacting with your co-workers.”

As a result, workers across a range of occupations need better communication and problem-solving skills than they used to.

College-educated people not only tend to have higher earnings than people without degrees, they are also more likely to have health and retirement benefits with their jobs, and they are far less likely to be unemployed. And having a degree is not just about economic advantages. People with college degrees are more likely to be satisfied with their jobs. They are more likely to read to their children, which helps their kids be better prepared for school than other children. People with degrees are also healthier.

On average, earnings increase for every degree someone gets, and the jumps are particularly large when people get graduate degrees. A person with a professional degree tends to make nearly twice as much as someone with just a bachelor’s degree.

The fact that there is such a big payoff for degrees is why there’s so much at stake in getting students to finish college, and in encouraging dropouts to come back.

The percentage of Americans who have college degrees has been rising. About 32 percent of people ages 25 to 34 have degrees from four-year colleges, up from 24 percent in the early 1980s. If you look at all adults in America, about 40 percent have some kind of college degree. source

Degree Matters For A Pilot

The actual degree program does not matter no matter what a particular college or university may tell you. The important part of having a degree is showing to the airline that you were able to meet the academic requirements as part of completing college. As an airline pilot, you endure recurrent training (training required annually), initial training (training on a new airplane) and upgrade training (transitioning from first officer to captain). So essentially, you spend most of your career studying new systems, procedures and techniques until the day you retire. The airlines want to know that you have good study habits and your success, or lack thereof, in college will show the airline how well you learn.

A degree in Aeronautical Science is as much a bachelors degree as one in Applied Astrophysics. As back up, you can minor in a non aviation degree to have more options.

Why Does a College Degree Matter?

When asked about why a major airline company may hire a certain pilot with a degree vs. a pilot with flight experience, here how he explained it.

Well, the short answer is that if XYZ Airlines wanted to hire 500 pilots and didn’t specify anything other than requiring the applicant to have a commercial pilot certificate or ATP rating, they would probably receive at least 25,000 applications from interested pilots.

By requiring pilots to have college degrees, they’re ensuring that the applicant at least has some ability to succeed in classroom learning, practice the same discipline used in acquiring the degree in the ground school and helps weed out to find the “cream of the crop”. I’m not saying that pilots with degrees are any better or worse than pilots without, but obtaining a college degree can be a whole lot easier than making it to the cockpit.

A college degree also should matter to you on a personal level. In 2001, the industry saw a lot of pilot furloughs where they were temporarily laid off and had to pursue other employment. Now if you have no skills or education apart from what you learned while attaining your certificates and ratings and you’re not able to find a flying job, you’ll be hard pressed to maintain your quality of life and continue to feed your family. If you want to keep all of your options open in the airline industry, get a degree. source

Top 15 Mistakes Made When Choosing a College
  1. Rushing the process. Finding the right college takes time and effort, not to mention research and an often lengthy application process. Waiting until the last minute or just “falling into a college” is never a good idea. It takes the most important factor out of the equation—you.
  2. Being a follower. Following a boyfriend, girlfriend, best friend to the college of their choice may seem like a good idea at the time because you want to be near them, but this is one of the most pivotal points in your life, too. You need to remember to make the best decisions for yourself and, if your relationships are strong, they will outlast time and distance anyway.
  3. The legacy lure. We’re aware the commandment states “Honor thy father and mother.” However, only considering colleges your parents, siblings or other family members went to in order to follow in their footsteps may not be in your best interest. It’s always better to explore your options and find the right fit for your personality.
  4. Rebellion. In contrast, only considering colleges your parents DON’T want you to go isn’t beneficial either. Sometimes, they have some good insight that may help you decide on what may be best for you. Don’t choose—or not choose—a college out of spite. This is sure to lead you down a path of regret. Choose a college based on what you want, not based on what someone else doesn’t.
  5. You’re a die-hard fan. We’ve all got our favorite teams, but let’s remember that just because they have a great sports team does not mean it’s the right educational fit for you. After all, you’re there to learn, not cheer them on. You can be a fan anywhere, but you can’t learn everywhere.
  6. The temptation to party. So, it’s a great party school but is it a great learning environment? While you may be itching to get out on your own and party like a rock star, that’s really not what college is about. Remember, when choosing a college that you want to choose somewhere what you can have a healthy social atmosphere but a setting that’s conducive to the real goal at hand—learning.
  7. How a student body looks. You’ve heard the student body is attractive. So what? Maybe you like this, maybe you’re worried you won’t fit in, either way, you should ignore these stereotypes because they probably are just that. Also, the attractiveness of a student body shouldn’t really make a different in your decision on where to get an education.
  8. Assuming the worst. Not applying to certain schools because you assume you won’t be accepted underrates your potential and potentially limits your future. Come on, you guys, we have reach schools for a reason. You never know what you can achieve if you don’t try, so at least make an attempt.
  9. Location, location, location. Whether you’re a homebody who wants to stay close or an escape artist who wants to get as far from home as possible, the location should be a factor in choosing a college, not the sole decision maker.
  10. Cost obsessions or carelessness. Forgetting to consider the cost or only considering the cost as a factor are two major issues to avoid. While cost is a huge hurdle, there are many other factors to consider as well and students should not be blinded by this one aspect. Reversely, students who are applying for financial aid or whose parents are paying for college should not neglect to think about cost completely, as costs can add up quite quickly.
  11. Not visiting. Experiences are relative and one person’s dream college could be another’s nightmare. This is why going by what you’ve been told is never a good idea. A person very different from you could have had a positive or negative experience that you likely would not have had. Also, only looking at the website or relying on a college’s advertising is a mistake because they tend to idealize college life and students get unrealistic expectations of what campus is like. It’s always better to visit and experience the college—or one very similar to it—for yourself.
  12. Relying on reputation. Just because it’s a “highly-ranked”, “prestigious” or a “designer” school doesn’t mean it’s the right school for you. Don’t always assume that the difficulty of getting into the school equates to the quality of education you’ll receive. Some students need smaller classes and more one-on-one interaction to thrive in a learning environment.
  13. Pushy parents. Letting your parents decide which college is right for you, or being forced by your parents to attend a certain school is not healthy. You need to think about what you want out of a college. After all, you’re the one attending the school.
  14. Having a one-track mind. Maybe you’ve wanted to go there since you were little and you’ve already decided there is only one right school for you. But not investigating all your options is a huge mistake. You can still attend you’re number one, we’re just asking you to check out the others, too. Just because you think it’s what you want doesn’t mean you can’t ask questions and, believe us, you can never ask too many!
  15. The college specializes in your current major. That’s right, we said current. Choosing a college solely because of a specific major or career path is a major (pun intended) issue because, odds are, your major will change several times. There’s nothing wrong with that, we just want you to be prepared with a school ready to accommodate all your dreams, whatever they may be. Source
Aviator College Degree Program
Approved by the FAA for a Restricted ATP Certificate at 1250 hours

2 year Associates Degree Program

The Aeronautical Science Program prepares the graduate for a career in the aviation industry by providing a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, aeronautical sciences, aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry. The graduate will receive an Associate of Science Degree from Aviator College with flight ratings from private pilot through commercial, with Flight Instructor ratings. This training is necessary to obtain employment, and by completing the associate’s degree you will set yourself apart from other applicants since a degree is preferred in the airline industry.

The flight portion of the program consists of a minimum of 565 flight hours and more multi-engine time than any other college or flight school today. Our large multi-engine fleet is equipped with Garmin 430s, and ASPEN EFIS is being introduced. Single engine fleet consists of Piper Warrior III with all glass (EFIS systems). Ground school is taught in a classroom environment.

The school’s14 acre campus encompasses 37,000 sq. ft. Administration & Academic training facility is open from 7 am to 6 pm daily. The Flight Operations building is open 24/7 daily, rain or shine.

Take a tour
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Student Pilot Code of Conduct

Student Pilot Code of ConductBecoming a pilot is a truly exhilarating and rewarding endeavor. As a newcomer to general aviation (GA) you will be exposed to many new and exciting precepts. This blog will list some of the values associated with being an exemplary GA pilot as illustrated in this Student Pilot’s Model Code of Conduct (Code of Conduct).

Student Pilot

Student pilot is the 1st license/certificate needed for pilot. You do not need a certificate to begin your flight training. You would only need it before you can fly solo.

Student Pilot Eligibility
  • You are at least 16 years old. If you plan to pilot a glider or balloon, you must be at least 14 years old.
  • You can read, speak, and understand English
  • You hold at least a current third-class medical certificate. If you plan to pilot a glider or balloon, you only have to certify that you have no medical defect that would make you unable to pilot a glider or balloon
Aviators Model Code of Conduct

The AMCC (Aviators Model Code of Conduct) is for use by aviation practitioners — pilots, mechanics, organizations, and the entire aviation community. Designed to be adaptable by the implementer, it is provided without charge and periodically updated.

The latest version of the code was released in April, 2012.

The Aviators Model Code of Conduct “offers recommendations to advance flight safety, airmanship, and professionalism.” Version 2.0, the latest update in a suite of products that includes model codes for aviation maintenance technicians, flight instructors, glider aviators, light sport aviators, seaplane pilots, and student pilots, includes a new emphasis on professionalism, enhanced focus on safety culture, and an emphasis on flight training and simulation devices, according to Michael Baum, a member of the board.

The Aviators Model Code of Conduct “promotes flight and ground safety, professionalism, and pilot contributions to the aviation community and society at large; encourages the development and adoption of good judgment, ethical behavior, and personal responsibility; and supports improved communications between pilots, regulators, and others in the aviation industry,” according to a news release. The all-volunteer effort offers models of behavior that it encourages members of the aviation community to adapt to their specific needs.

As you pursue the goal of learning to fly, careful attention to understanding safety and excellence greatly enhances the quality of your current and future training (and may even accelerate it). It also helps you to cultivate a philosophy or attitude toward flying that will serve you and society well throughout your flying career.

It presents a vision of excellence for student pilots (whether they are seeking a Sport Pilot, Recreational Pilot, or Private Pilot certificate) with principles that both complement and supplement what is merely legal. The Code of Conduct is not a “standard” and is not intended to be implemented as such. Some of the provisions of the Code of Conduct have been simplified to accommodate the novice; after gaining more knowledge and experience, student pilots should refer to the Aviators’ Model Code of Conduct in the flight safety section.

The Principles:

The Code of Conduct consists of the following seven sections (each containing principles and sample recommended practices).

  1. General Responsibilities of Student Pilots
  2. Passengers and People on the Surface
  3. Training and Proficiency
  4. Security
  5. Environmental Issues
  6. Use of Technology
  7. Advancement and Promotion of General Aviation
The Sample Recommended Practices:

To further the effective use of the Code of Conduct’s principles, Sample Recommended Practices offer examples of ways student pilots might integrate the principles into their own training. The Sample Recommended Practices (which include selected personal minimums) can help student pilots and their instructors develop practices uniquely suited to their own activities and situations. Unlike the Code of Conduct principles themselves, the Sample Recommended Practices may be modified to satisfy the unique capabilities and requirements of each student pilot, mission, aircraft, and training program. Some Sample Recommended Practices do in fact exceed the stringency of their associated Code of Conduct principles. They are not presented in any particular order.

Benefits of the Code of Conduct:

The Code of Conduct may benefit student pilots and the GA community by:

  • highlighting important practices that will help student pilots become better, safer aviators,
  • suggesting a mental framework for flight training,
  • addressing individual pilot’s roles within the larger GA community, by examining issues such as improved pilot training, better airmanship, desired pilot conduct, personal responsibility, and pilots’ contributions to the GA community and society at large,
  • encouraging the development and adoption of ethical guidelines, and
  • bridging the gap between student and certificated pilots, with the goal of advancing a common aviation culture.
Student Pilots’ Model

Code of Conduct – Principles
1 General Responsibilities of Student Pilots
Student pilots should:

  1. make safety their number one priority,
  2. seek excellence in airmanship,
  3. develop and exercise good judgment,
  4. recognize and manage risks effectively,
  5. adhere to prudent operating practices and personal operating parameters (for example, minimums), as developed with your flight instructor,
  6. aspire to professionalism,
  7. act with responsibility and courtesy, and
  8. adhere to applicable laws and regulations.

Explanation: Code of Conduct Section I serves as a preamble to and umbrella for the Code of Conduct’s other principles. It emphasizes safety, excellence, risk management, responsibility, and lays the foundation for accountability and heightened diligence.

Sample Recommended Practices:
  • Recognize, accept, and plan for the costs of implementing proper safety practices (often greater than expected).
  • Learn to identify prevailing conditions and adapt to changing in-flight conditions as directed by your certificated flight instructor.
  • Recognize the increased risks associated with flying in inclement weather, at night, over water, and over rugged, mountainous or forested terrain. Take steps to manage those risks effectively and prudently without exceeding personal
  • Approach flying with the utmost seriousness and diligence, recognizing that your life and the lives of others depend on you.
  • parameters (see Code of Conduct I.e.).
  • Develop, use, periodically review, and refine personal checklists and personal minimums for all phases of flight operations. Seek the input and approval of these materials by your certificated flight instructor.
  • If the weather doesn’t look good, it probably isn’t – don’t push it.
  • Learn the performance limitations of all aircraft you fly, and how to plan flights and determine fuel requirements.
  • Understand and use appropriate procedures in the event radio communications are lost.
  • Be familiar with The Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR). They represent the distilled wisdom of more than 80 years of flying experience.
  • Commit to making personal wellness a precondition of flying.
  • See and be seen. Learn and employ techniques for seeing other aircraft, such as scanning, and techniques to enhance your own visibility to avoid other aircraft, such as the use of radio, lights, and strobes.
  • For cross-country operations, identify alternate landing sites and available fuel along the planned route prior to departure in case deteriorating weather or other emergency circumstances make continued flight unsafe.
  • Exercise great caution when maneuvering at low altitudes.
  • Develop a firm understanding of effective decision-making.
  • Adhere to applicable flying club/school and Fixed Base Operator/flight centre rules and operating practices.
  • Learn the fundamentals well before proceeding to more advanced techniques and maneuvers. Source
Flying Lessons at Aviator Flight Training Academy

The Aviator Flight Training Academy offers a full line of flight training courses to meet the individual needs of each student.

Contact Aviator
Schedule a visit
Speak with a flight instructor, call 772-672-8222.

Which Flight Training Is Right For You, Modular or Integrated

Which Flight Training Is Right For You, Modular or IntegratedAny student wishing to become a pilot is learning one true fact very fast. Flight training to become a pilot is extremely expensive. In addition to money, time and commitment plays an integral part as well. Whether you want to fly for fun on the weekends or want to become a captain of a major airline company do a thorough research so your money is properly invested!

Pilot training is available on-site at most airports, either through an FAA-certificated (approved) pilot school* or through other training providers. An approved school may be able to provide a greater variety of training aids, dedicated facilities, and more flexibility in scheduling. A number of colleges and universities also provide pilot training as a part of their curricula.

Flight school you choose will be the foundation of your training. The type of flight school you choose and the experience of your flight instructor will be crucial in your pilot training. Choose wisely. Create two checklists to bring with you on your flight school research. One list should be a flight school checklist and the other should be a flight instructor checklist. Some sample checklist items are:

  1. How long has the school been in business?
  2. What is the school’s safety record?
  3. What is the availability of aircraft?
  4. How long has the instructor been teaching?
  5. How many students has the instructor taught for the license or rating you seek?
Integrated vs. Modular Flight Training

What are the facts concerning Modular and Integrated training? That is a popular topic among many pilots and has been for many years. There are some who prefer Integrated and others who prefer Modular, but for someone trying to choose a route it can get very confusing very quickly. When people are faced with a decision to choose between two of anything, the best way is to compare each and list both positive and negative. Make a pros and con list.

What Is Modular Flight Training

Modular training (which was known as ‘the self improver’ route) basically involves the trainee getting one license at a time. This route will take them from a PPL (Private Pilots License), through hour building and then onto ATPL theory (which could be done whilst hour building, for example, to save time). Upon successful completion of the 14 exams, you can then begin the CPL, IR and MEP. 150 PPL flying hours are required before starting the CPL. The CPL, IR (instrument rating) and MEP (Multi-engine Piston rating) can be completed in any order. Other modules can then be added on top of this to prepare the student for multi-crew Jet aircraft flying. The MCC (Multi Crew Co-operation course) and JOC (Jet Orientation Course) are both offered by numerous flight schools. The first aims to build up your experience in a multi-crew environment, and the latter provides you with Jet Simulator time, during which students will fly in IFR conditions in a multi-pilot role. Emphasis is placed on developing CRM (Crew Resource Management) skills, which is a vital part of the job. You will end up with an fATPL (frozen Airline Transport Pilots License), which allows you to apply for the airlines.

Modular students are not tied to any particular company, and have the freedom to complete the training at their own speed, perhaps whilst earning. This route is ideal for those who want to stay in work whilst they train and, as you probably know by now, it often works out to be much cheaper than the Integrated route.

What Is Integrated Flight Training

Integrated flight training is mainly a Modular flight training all balled up into one full-time course. Instead you will do single engine flight training (over 100 hours) followed by some Multi Engine time and then the CPL skills test. You will finish this section with an MEP rating and CPL license.

You will train, full-time, at one FTO (Flight Training Operator). Many FTO’s provide Integrated Courses, and most require the applicant to sit an assessment which is a pre-requisite to beginning training. These assessments will test Hand-Eye co-ordination, maths and physics skills, and will include interviews and/or group assessments as well as simulator tests.

If you pass an FTO’s assessment, you will be offered a place on their course. No previous flying time is required but a trial flight or two is, in my view, vital (to see if you actually enjoy it)! In reality, you’ll find that most will have flown previously.

When onto a course, the Integrated route generally starts with ATPL groundschool, where all 14 exams are studied for and sat over a 6 to 8 month period. Following this, trainees will then begin flight training, which is usually done abroad.

Following the CPL Skills test, Integrated students will then start the IR course where suddenly, the weather in Blightly is favorable for your training! This will be completed in multi-engine aircraft, and culminates in the IR rating being issued. From there, students go straight on to complete the MCC/JOC.

Many Integrated courses have added extras that can include CV workshops, extra modules (Often covering other areas of aviation, to give students a more broad knowledge of the industry) and foundation degrees. For example, OAA include ‘First Officer Fundamentals’ with their APPFO Integrated course, as well as a Foundation Degree. However, this is not to say that Modular providers don’t give you some extra goodies! ProPilot, a Coventry based ATPL groundschool provider, offer ‘Pilot Development Days’ which aim to provide students with a broader knowledge of the subjects they are studying (often provided by experts in the relevent field).

At the end of both Modular and Integrated training, students will have all of the licenses that make up what us EU bunch call the fATPL (frozen Airline Transport Pilots License). From here, you will be in a position to apply to the airlines, where the fATPL will become ‘unfrozen’ when 1500hours have been flown. Once un-frozen, you are technically able to advance to captaincy. Other avenues can be taken upon gaining an fATPL of course, such as Flight Instruction or Bush Flying.

Positives and Negatives For Integrated Flight Training

  • More focused, full-time training
  • All training is done at one FTO, meaning a complete training record is available to airlines
  • Lots of “added extras” included in the course (i.e. foundation degree, CV workshops, modules covering other areas of the industry).
  • Some FTO’s will pay you back if your training ceases
  • Graduate services and Cadet holding pools. Airlines will approach their partnered FTO’s and take on a number of Integrated cadets as and when required.
  • A lot of airlines take more Integrated than Modular pilots. Some airlines have exclusive agreements with FTO’s, meaning they will only take low-hour pilots from an Integrated source. This does not mean that modular pilots won’t get hired!
  • More expensive
  • You can’t ‘pay as you go’, license to license. However, you will pay in installments as you train which gives financial security.

Positives and Negatives For Modular Flight Training
  • A possible cheaper option
  • You can fit training around other commitments (work, family etc…)
  • Training can be completed to a more ‘Integrated’ timescale (Integrated Modular)
  • You aren’t tied to any particular company
  • Pay as you go’ payment is an option. This gives you more control over funds.
  • Training can be less focused
  • Takes longer (not necessarily a bad thing, it depends on your situation)The vast majority of modular FTO’s don’t have contracts/agreements with airlines, where they will take cadets from a holding pool. Source
Modular Flight Training With Aviator Flight Training Academy

The Aviator Flight Training Academy offers a full line of flight training courses to meet the individual needs of each student.

Multi, Instrument, & Commercial
  • 150 Hours of Multi-Engine
  • Cross Country flying coast-to-coast
  • Price includes flight instruction and all ground instruction
  • Course time is eight weeks or less
  • Writtens and Checkrides are extra
  • NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time
  • To enroll you must hold your PPL and 100 hours total time
  • Eight weeks of housing included (one person per bedroom)

$ 29,995.00
Financing Available for those who qualify

Multi_Engine Rating
  • 10 Hours Multi-Engine
  • Pre & Post Flight, Ground Instruction
  • NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time

$ 3,100.00

For a full list of flight training option, contact aviator or schedule a visit.
Talk to a flight training instructor 772-672-8222.

Different Types of Flight Schools and Flight Training Offered in US

Different Types of Flight Schools and Flight Training Offered in USWith a shortage of pilots evident in US, now is a good opportunity for students who ever thought of becoming a pilot.
U.S. airlines are facing what threatens to be their most serious pilot shortage since the 1960s, with higher experience requirements for new hires about to take hold just as the industry braces for a wave of retirements.

Federal mandates that took effect in 2013 require all newly hired pilots to have at least 1,500 hours of prior flight experience—six times the current minimum—raising the cost and time to train new fliers in an era when pay cuts and more-demanding schedules already have made the profession less attractive. Meanwhile, thousands of senior pilots at major airlines soon will start hitting the mandatory retirement age of 65.

Another federal safety rule that effect in early 2014, also will squeeze the supply, by giving pilots more daily rest time. This change is expected to force passenger airlines to increase their pilot ranks by at least 5%. Adding to the problem is a small but steady stream of U.S. pilots moving to overseas carriers, many of which already face an acute shortage of aviators and pay handsomely to land well-trained U.S. captains.

“This is going to come to a crisis,” said Bob Reding, recently retired executive vice president of operations at AMR Corp.’s American Airlines and now a consultant to FlightSafety International Inc., an aviation training provider.

With new strict requirements in flight training time, the decision to become a pilot should not be taken lightly. The career path to become a pilot requires commitment and financial resources to achieve your goal. Flight training is a very serious investment and should not be taken lightly. Do you research to find out which flight school to choose that will best suit your needs.

Choosing Flight School

With over 1,900 flight schools to pick from, you’ll have lots of options. But which one is right for you? It helps if you have an idea of what you want from aviation. Do you want to fly for fun, for business, or as a career?

What is common for most flight schools is that all of them have a chief flight instructor. This is the person in charge of all flight training and can be compared to the principle of an ordinary school. Depending on the size of the flight school this usually is a person with a lot of flight time and instruction time. Quite often they are retired airline pilots or ex-military pilots with a genuine interest in flying and flight training.

His or her job is to look after all the flight training with the school and you are likely to fly with him on stage checks or progression tests. Depending on the size of the school he may have own students.

Under the chief flight instructor you find from one to several assistant chief flight instructors. They are senior instructors with the flight school or have a lot of instruction time. Like the chief flight instructor they perform stage checks or progression tests. Often they are responsible for a certain area of the training, ex. private pilot courses or instrument rating courses. The assistant chief flight instructor(s) may have own students, and quite often teaching other instructor students due to their experience level.

Under the chief and his assistant(s) you find all the flight instructors. They do most of the training at the flight school. Depending on the instructor certificates held he or she will do most of the flight training with you. Many instructors are fresh out of flight school and work as instructors to build flight time. Unfortunately some are not very interested in instructing, so always pay attention to your instructor’s behavior in the beginning and go to your assistant chief flight instructor or chief flight instructor if you experience no progression. Sometimes the problem is the instructor, not you.

Dual Certificate school
These are flight schools offering certificates to more then just their national certificates. Good examples are schools in the United States offering training to both FAA (USA) and JAA (Europe) certificates. These are usually large flight schools and they may be offering it through partnering schools in other countries. Some even have courses leading to both FAA and JAA certificates. This is commonly done by making you an FAA pilot first and build up flight time in the United States (as a flight instructor, small cargo or banner pilot), before you go back to Europe for conversion to JAA. Even though this way usually is a little more expensive it is a good way to build flight time and get dual certificates.
Types of Flight Schools—Part 61 and Part 141 Schools, Flight Time, and Earning a Pilot Certificate
Flight schools come in two flavors, Part 61 and Part 141, which refer to the parts of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) under which they operate. The most common and least important distinction between them is the minimum flight time required for the private pilot certificate (sometimes called a pilot license)—40 hours under Part 61, and 35 hours under Part 141.

Considering that the national average for earning a private pilot certificate is 60-75 hours (how long you’ll take will depend on your ability and flying frequency), this difference isn’t important for initial pilot training. It does make a difference to commercial pilot applicants: Part 61 requires 250 hours, and Part 141 requires 190.

What differentiates the two is structure and accountability. Part 141 flight schools are periodically audited by the FAA and must have detailed, FAA-approved course outlines and meet student pilot performance rates. Part 61 schools don’t have the same paperwork and accountability requirements.

Learning under Part 61 rules can often give students the flexibility to rearrange flying lesson content and sequence to meet their needs, which can be of benefit to part-time students. Many Part 141 schools also train students under Part 61 rules. Source

Ground School, Distant Learning and Online School

In addition to all the flight schools you also have schools only offering the theory part. As there is a lot of reading involved to become a pilot some only offer this part. The benefit is you can get rid of all the written pretty fast and then concentrate on the flying. With distant learning and online schools you can also be anywhere in the world and still do their programs.

Especially pilots brushing up on lost knowledge (there is a lot to keep track of), flight instructors renewing their certificate or pilots converting from one nationality to another use ground, distant learning or online schools.

Also as many part 61 schools do not offer ground school classes and paying an instructor by the hour to teach you may be expensive, doing a class this way may be smart when starting your training.

Make A Summary Flight School Checklist

What flight school you ultimately choose depends on the quality flight training you desire in a method convenient to your schedule. In earning your private pilot certificate, you will have achieved a license to learn. Aviation is an ever-changing activity, and good pilots are always learning.

  • Determine your aviation goals. Are you learning to fly for fun or do you plan to pursue a career?
  • Compile a list of schools to examine, and request literature from each. Review material from each school and answer the questions outlined earlier here.
  • Once you’ve done your homework, visit the final two or three schools that pass the test. Ask questions and get a feel for the personalities of the schools. Ask specific questions and insist on specific answers. Talk to other students and flight instructors.
  • Once you’ve decided on a school, be sure a written agreement outlines the payment procedures.
  • Use online flight school directory to find a flight school near you.
Aviator Flight School in Florida

Location is very important when you are looking for a flight training school. Florida is a great place to earn your wings. The moderate and mild climate makes flight training a pleasure. The good weather allows you to log more flying hours faster, get your degree quicker and be on the way sooner to your new aviation career. Ft. Pierce is a small city with friendly people – without congested traffic on the ground or in the air.

Founded in 1982 Aviator Flight School offered opportunities to students looking to receive training to fulfill the specialized demands of the airline industry. The Aviator Flight School moved from Addison, Texas to its current location at the Fort Pierce, Florida, campus in 1999.The school has continued to grow and evolve. In 2009 Aviator became a college and expanded into the current 77,500 sq. ft. campus.

Since 1982, when the first students signed up for flight training, students at the Aviator Flight School have earned more than 20,000 FAA Licenses. From the beginning, Aviator has been committed to excellence in education. The majority of our graduate pilots are flying professionally in the U.S. and around the world.
Today we operate a fleet of more than 30 aircraft that fly over 30,000 hours yearly. As the Flight School advances and the alumni increase, the college remains focused on developing leaders and professionals in the aviation industry.

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Educational Guide On Becoming An Airline Pilot

Educational Guide On Becoming An Airline PilotWhen flying is all you want to do, learning to fly is all on your agenda. Although you don’t need a student pilot certificate to take flying lessons, you do need one before you can fly solo. Student pilot certificate’s eligibility requirements are as follows:

  1. You are at least 16 years old. If you plan to pilot a glider or balloon, you must be at least 14 years old.
  2. You can read, speak, and understand English
  3. You hold at least a current third-class medical certificate. If you plan to pilot a glider or balloon, you only have to certify that you have no medical defect that would make you unable to pilot a glider or balloon.

You get a student pilot certificate by submitting a request to FAA inspector or an FAA-designated pilot examiner. an FAA-authorized aviation medical examiner will issue you a combined medical certificate and Student Pilot Certificate after you complete your physical examination. Applicants who fail to meet certain requirements or who have physical disabilities which might limit, but not prevent, their acting as pilots, should contact the nearest FAA office. Locate An Aviation Medical Examiner

Physical and Background Qualifications

Candidates must pass a physical exam demonstrating that they are in good health and without any physical limitations that could impair their performance. While commercial pilots must pass a physical exam every year, airline pilots must pass one every six months. A pilot’s vision does not have to be naturally perfect, but must be correctable to 20/20 with glasses or contacts. Airlines conduct a 10-year FBI background check along with driving record checks, drug tests and credit checks for all pilot applicants. Any felony convictions will disqualify you, as will any evidence of drug or alcohol abuse.

Personal Qualities

Pilots must be capable of quick reaction time and be able to make decisions rapidly under pressure. Many life-threatening emergencies can occur without warning, and pilots must be able to respond immediately and appropriately while remaining calm and in control. In addition, pilots must be detail-oriented, as they are required to simultaneously monitor many controls and systems. As pilots must work closely with their flight crew, air traffic controllers and flight dispatchers, the ability to work within a team is also an important quality.

Education and Training

Once you complete your first flight lesson, you are considered a Student Pilot. A typical pilot looking to get hired by the airlines will usually get the following certificates and ratting in the order listed below.

To begin flying, not even a high school diploma is necessary. The FAA does require people to read, write and speak English, though. Flight school, military training or private lessons give beginners their initial flight education. People wanting to fly recreationally can end their education here, graduating from student to recreational pilot by passing the test for a recreational certificate. Most pilots continue on, since the recreational certificate has many restrictions, including no passengers, no night flights and no ability to earn money for flight services.

Traditionally, the vast majority of pilots received their education and training through military service, because civilian flight schools could not begin to match the level of extensive training and flight hours provided by the military. Today, with decreasing numbers of people joining the armed forces, an increasing number of pilots are coming out of civilian flight schools, including colleges and universities that have been certified by the Federal Aviation Administration. Most airlines now require a bachelor’s degree. Although the degree can be in any subject, airlines generally prefer coursework in aviation, mathematics, physics, aeronautical engineering and English. The cost of civilian training can be prohibitive. The amount of flight school sufficient to obtain a commercial pilot’s license can cost up to $80,000; this is in addition to the cost of earning a bachelor’s degree. In Europe, airlines train and educate candidates who have little or no flying experience to become qualified airline pilots in exchange for a multiple-year employment commitment. This is called “ab initio” training and, while being considered for future implementation in the United States, it is not widely available in North America.

Licensure

All pilots whose job requires that they transport people or cargo are required to have a commercial pilot’s license and an instrument rating. To be eligible to take the licensing exam, pilots must be at least 18 years of age and have logged 250 hours of flight time. The licensing exam is a written test on FAA regulations, safety procedures and navigation techniques. After the written exam, pilots must undergo a flight test with an FAA-designated examiner to demonstrate their flying skills. Instrument rating is a test to show that pilots can fly during periods of low visibility using instrument readings alone. Instrument rating consists of accumulating 40 hours of instrument flight experience, a written exam and practical demonstration before an examiner. Source

Airline and Commercial Pilots

Airline and commercial pilots fly and navigate airplanes, helicopters, and other aircraft. Airline pilots fly for airlines that transport people and cargo on a fixed schedule. Commercial pilots fly aircraft for other reasons, such as charter flights, rescue operations, firefighting, aerial photography, and aerial application, also known as crop dusting.

Airline Pilot Pay

Median annual wages, May 2012
Airline pilots, copilots, and flight engineers -$114,200
Airline and commercial pilots -$98,410
Commercial pilots -$73,280

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics

The median annual wage for airline pilots, copilots, and flight engineers was $114,200 in May 2012. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $66,970, and the top 10 percent earned more than $187,200.
According to the Air Line Pilots Association, International, most airline pilots begin their careers earning about $20,000 per year. Wages increase each year until the pilot accumulates the experience and seniority needed to become a captain. The average captain at a regional airline earns about $55,000 per year, while the average captain at a major airline earns about $135,000 per year.

In addition, airline pilots receive an expense allowance, or “per diem,” for every hour they are away from home, and they may earn extra pay for international flights. Airline pilots also are eligible for health insurance and retirement benefits, and their immediate families usually are entitled to free or reduced-fare flights.
The median annual wage for commercial pilots was $73,280 in May 2012.The lowest 10 percent earned less than $38,520, and the top 10 percent earned more than $134,990. source

Why Choose Aviator Flight School For Your Pilot Training
  • Licensed by the State of Florida Commission For Independent Education License #4155
  • Aviator Flight Training Academy is a Division of Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology, which is licensed by the State of Florida Commission for Independent Education and Accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges.
  • 27 Years in the Flight Training Industry
  • To date, Aviator has trained over 5000 pilots for the commercial airline industry
  • Only School Offering 200 Hours of Multi-Engine Time
  • Aviator is the only flight school that has a full 200 hours of multi-engine time included in our program
  • No Flight Training Devices (Simulators)
  • FTDs are not used towards your flight time for any ratings
  • Approved by the Federal Department of Education to offer Title IV Loans
  • Aviator has the ability to offer students federal funding on approved accredited programs
  • Job Placement Assistance with Regional Airlines
  • Aviator offers job placement assistance for our graduates
  • “A” Rating with United States Better Business Bureau
  • Classroom Environment – All classes taught in our educational center, NOT online

Are You Ready To Begin Flight Training

Are You Ready To Begin Flight TrainingCareer pilot is as challenging as it is rewarding. Like any other field, aviation has many paths to offer and all depends on what long term goals you want to achieve. Your choice of a flight school might depend on whether you are planning to obtain a sport pilot certificate, recreational pilot certificate, private pilot certificate, or whether you intend to pursue a career as a professional pilot.

Another consideration is whether you will train part time or full time. Do not make the mistake of making your determination based on financial concerns alone. The quality of training you receive is very important. Prior to making a final decision, visit the school you are considering, and talk with management, instructors, and students. Evaluate the items on the checklist you developed, and then take time to think things over before making your decision.

Ground and flight training should be obtained as regularly and frequently as possible. This assures maximum retention of instruction and the achievement of requisite proficiency.

The Role of the Instructor

The student pilot’s training program depends upon the quality of the ground and flight training received. A flight instructor should possess an understanding of the learning process, a knowledge of the fundamentals of teaching, and the ability to communicate effectively with the student pilot. During the certification process, a flight instructor applicant is tested on a practical application of these skills in specific teaching situations. The quality of instruction, and the knowledge and skills acquired from your flight instructor will affect your entire flying career whether you plan to pursue it as a vocation or an avocation.

What Flight Training Requires

A course of instruction should include the ground and flight training necessary to acquire the knowledge and skills required to safely and efficiently function as a certificated pilot. Whether you attend a part 141 or part 61 school or obtain the services of an individual flight instructor, the specific knowledge and skill areas for each category and class of aircraft are outlined in Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR). Refer to 14 CFR part 61, subpart J for the requirements of a sport pilot certificate. Refer to 14 CFR part 61, subpart D for the requirements of a recreational pilot certificate. Refer to 14 CFR part 61, subpart E for the requirements of a private pilot certificate.

Medical Requirements for Flight Training

Pilots, except those who fly gliders or free air balloons, must possess a valid medical certificate in order to exercise the privileges of their airman certificates. Sport pilots must possess either a valid third-class medical certificate or a valid driver’s license. The periodic medical examination required for medical certification is conducted by designated aviation medical examiners, who are physicians with a special interest in aviation safety and have training in aviation medicine. The standards for medical certification are contained in 14 CFR part 67. The requirements for obtaining medical certification are contained in 14 CFR part 61.

Prior to beginning flight training, a flight instructor should interview you about any health conditions and determine your goal as a pilot. Good advice would be to obtain the class of medical certificate required, for the certificate level you ultimately want, before beginning flight training. Finding out immediately whether you are medically qualified could save time and money.

Flight Training FAQ for Pilot Students
How and Where Can I Get a Student Pilot Certificate?

An aviation medical examiner (AME) typically gives you a student pilot certificate to fill out as part of the third class medical exam. Your flight instructor will likely refer you to a local AME, or you can find an examiner online using AOPA’s database of AME’s searchable by city and state. A student pilot certificate is valid for 24 calendar months and a third class medical could be valid for up to 36 months, depending on your age at the time of your AME visit. If your student pilot certificate expires first, you can get a new one from a designated pilot examiner (DPE) or your local Flight Standards District Office (FSDO).

What Are Different Pilot Certificates?

Pilot Certificates issued by the FAA have the following characteristics:
Grade – determines the kinds of flying a pilot can do

  1. Student Pilot – local solo training flights without passengers
  2. Recreational Pilot – local uncontrolled day flights 1 passenger
  3. Private Pilot – flights worldwide with passengers, non-profit
  4. Commercial Pilot – paid flying allowed, can be airline copilot
  5. Airline Transport Pilot – paid flights, can be airline captain
How Long Does It Take to Learn to Fly and Get a Pilot Certificate?

The same variables that affect the cost of learning to fly will affect the time it takes to earn your certificate. The FAA has established the minimum number of flight hours needed to obtain a certificate. Under Part 61 of the federal aviation regulations, the minimums are 20 hours for a sport pilot certificate, 30 hours for a recreational certificate, and 40 hours for a private pilot certificate. Some schools operate under an alternate regulation, Part 141, which provides more FAA oversight, more rigid schedules, and more paperwork. The added requirements allow them to reduce the minimum hours of private pilot training to 35 hours. However, many schools believe that a true average flight training time for a private pilot is between 50 hours and 60 hours, whether the school operates under Part 61 or Part 141 schools. Others believe that 68 to 70 hours is the more likely average. These flight hours can be spread over a time span of several months to a year or more.

What Are the Differences Between a Part 61 and a Part 141 Flight School?

Part 141 flight schools have more FAA oversight, more rigid schedules, and more paperwork. For the added requirements, they are allowed to reduce the minimum required hours of private pilot training to 35 hours, rather than the 40-hour minimum required when training at a Part 61 flight school. The Part 61 school, on the other hand, is able to be more flexible with training schedules, and has the ability to tailor the curriculum to meet individual students’ training needs. Either school must train you to pass the very same practical test.

When Can I Fly Solo?

A: Your certified flight instructor (CFI) will carefully monitor your progress and, once you are both comfortable with your performance, the CFI will clear you to begin “solo” flights under his/her supervision. During solo flights you will fly the aircraft without anyone else on board – not even the instructor. Your first solo typically includes three take-offs and landings, and generally occurs within the first 25 hours of training.

When F1 Visa Is Required

An F1 visa is issued to international students who are attending an academic program or English Language Program at a US collge or university. F-1 students must maintain the minimum course load for full-time student status. They can remain in the US up to 60 days beyond the length of time it takes to complete their academic program. In addition, an F1 student can remain for 12 months after securing a degree to work under the OPT (Optional Practical Training) program. F1 students are expected to complete their studies by the expiration date on their I-20 form (Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant Student Status) which is provided by the US college or university that the student has been accepted to and will attend.

Five Facts About Flight Training

  • FACT: The current recession has created fierce competition for jobs in all industries. Now is the perfect opportunity for you to start your flight training in an industry that has tremendous potential!
  • FACT: Airline jobs are not going away, the demand is beginning to increase. For many current airline pilots, the mandatory retirement age is approaching!
  • FACT: The FAA is now taking a more serious look at airline pilot flight training. This is forcing the airline industry to take a harder look at candidates for pilot replacements!
  • FACT: Professional Pilots must now have first-rate knowledge and continually upgraded skills if they want to hear the word “Hired!” Pilots who train at quality aviation schools and who possess the technical knowledge, first-rate flying skills and a professional attitude will have the hiring edge!
  • FACT: Professionalism and knowledge are now prerequisites for entrance into the worldwide airline industry. Fast paced, “fast track” programs, or self-study courses will not meet the new airline industry standards.

Why Choose Aviator Flight School For Your Pilot Training
  • Licensed by the State of Florida Commission For Independent Education License #4155
    Aviator Flight Training Academy is a Division of Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology, which is licensed by the State of Florida Commission for Independent Education and Accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges.
  • 27 Years in the Flight Training Industry
    To date, Aviator has trained over 5000 pilots for the commercial airline industry
  • Only School Offering 200 Hours of Multi-Engine Time
    Aviator is the only flight school that has a full 200 hours of multi-engine time included in our program
  • No Flight Training Devices (Simulators)
    FTDs are not used towards your flight time for any ratings
  • Approved by the Federal Department of Education to offer Title IV Loans
    Aviator has the ability to offer students federal funding on approved accredited programs
  • Job Placement Assistance with Regional Airlines
    Aviator offers job placement assistance for our graduates
  • “A” Rating with United States Better Business Bureau
  • Classroom Environment – All classes taught in our educational center, NOT online

Contact Aviator
Schedule a Visit

Which Flight Training Program is Right For You

Which Flight Training Program is Right For YouThere are over 300 two- and four-year colleges with aviation programs and aviation schools in the United States and world-wide that offer various aviation programs (including non-engineering programs) to students interested in pursuing a career in aviation.

Florida is a great place to earn your wings. The weather stays warm through out the year, almost all 365 days! The moderate and mild climate makes flight training a pleasure. The good weather allows you to log more flying hours faster, get your degree quicker and be on the way sooner to your new aviation career.

Being a pilot is a well-respected job in the community, and the pay is good in general. The education path you choose depends upon the type of pilot you want to become: a commercial pilot or just want to fly as a hobby with private pilot license in hand. Whereas many pilots formerly came from the military where they gained their flying experience, more and more these days have a college education, an aviation degree even, with flight training from schools that are Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certified. As a result, more employers are reportedly beginning to require college degrees as well.

Some airlines hire high school graduates, but most prefer airline pilots with at least a 2 year degree. As the number of college-educated applicants increases, this is becoming an educational requirement. It takes much more than completing an educational aviation program to become an aircraft pilot, however. Depending on their responsibilities, pilots these days must have hundreds to thousands of hours of flight experience behind them. They might also have to fulfill other requirements.

Types Of Flight Training Programs

There are four items to consider when choosing the best flight training program: hands-on training, equipment, admissions requirements, and faculty. A flight training program can be part of a larger college, but can also be an independent school. The best flight training programs are affiliated with the local airfields or airplane pilot training programs. In the United States, the military is a popular option for flight training.

Selecting the best school should be based on your own goals, achievements, and skill levels. Select a school where you will be both challenged and successful. The best school is often a matter of specialized programs, designed to provide additional skills or support. For example, the best school for someone who does not like crowds would have small class sizes and be on a small campus. Students who prefer a lot of social interaction as part of their learning process might benefit from being in a larger school, with a broader range of programs and students.

The best flight training programs have a wide range of equipment available for student use. This includes full- and half-size airplane models, flight simulation programs, opportunities to practice in specially designed planes, and other simulation programs. Check the average class size to ensure you will have ample opportunity to use this equipment. This is critical, as practical skill as a pilot is required to obtain a flying license. Source

Why Flight Experience is a Must

In addition to solid education, flight experience is also a must for a pilot license. The Armed Forces provide many experienced airline pilots due to extensive flying time. Also appropriate are flight schools or lessons from FAA-certified flight instructors. Training includes a week of company indoctrination, 3 to 6 weeks of simulator training on the ground and 25 hours of initial operating experience. Once or twice a year throughout their career they must attend training or checks.

For a license, applicants must by 18 or older and have 250 hours of experience in the air. They also need to pass an exam and have 20/20 vision with or without corrective lenses, good hearing, no physical handicaps that could impair performance, and be in good health. They also need to be rated by the FAA to fly by instruments in periods of low visibility. And airline pilots working as captains must have an air transport pilot’s license.

Airline pilots may advance into other flying jobs such as flying corporate planes. A small number find jobs at the airlines as flight engineers. Seniority helps determine the most desirable routes. With 1 to 5 years of experience they become first officers and with 5 to 15 years they become captains.

Aviator College Degree Program
Approved by the FAA for a Restricted ATP Certificate at 1250 hours
2 year Associates Degree Program

The Aeronautical Science Program prepares the graduate for a career in the aviation industry by providing a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, aeronautical sciences, aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry. The graduate will receive an Associate of Science Degree from Aviator College with flight ratings from private pilot through commercial, with Flight Instructor ratings. This training is necessary to obtain employment, and by completing the associate’s degree you will set yourself apart from other applicants since a degree is preferred in the airline industry.

The flight portion of the program consists of a minimum of 565 flight hours and more multi-engine time than any other college or flight school today. Our large multi-engine fleet is equipped with Garmin 430s, and ASPEN EFIS is being introduced. Single engine fleet consists of Piper Warrior III with all glass (EFIS systems). Ground school is taught in a classroom environment.

Contact Aviator
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Schedule a visit