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Student Tips For Choosing Your Flight School

Student Tips For Choosing Your Flight SchoolThere are a lot of factors to consider before you chose a flight school to begin your flight training. Once thing is for certain and no research is needed to confirm it-it is expensive! So as pilot, you need to invest your money wisely. Do not base your decision solely on advertisement flight schools post. Visit the school, talk to attending students, speak with flight instructors, inquire about their flight training program.

Type of Flight School

Flight schools come in two flavors, Part 61 and Part 141, which refer to the parts of the federal aviation regulations (FARs) under which they operate. The most common and least important distinction between them is the minimum flight time required for the private pilot certificate (sometimes called a pilot license)—40 hours under Part 61, and 35 hours under Part 141.

Considering that the national average for earning a private pilot certificate is 60-75 hours (how long you’ll take will depend on your ability and flying frequency), this difference isn’t important for initial pilot training. It does make a difference to commercial pilot applicants: Part 61 requires 250 hours, and Part 141 requires 190.
What differentiates the two is structure and accountability. Part 141 schools are periodically audited by the FAA and must have detailed, FAA-approved course outlines and meet student pilot performance rates. Part 61 schools don’t have the same paperwork and accountability requirements.

Learning under Part 61 rules can often give students the flexibility to rearrange flying lesson content and sequence to meet their needs, which can be of benefit to part-time students. Many Part 141 flight schools also train students under Part 61 rules.

Which type of flight school is best for you depends on your needs, available time, and other factors, such as veteran’s benefit eligibility (only Part 141 schools can qualify for VA-reimbursed training) and location. When it comes to the FAA checkride, which is the same for all, it doesn’t matter where you learned to fly, only how well—including your understanding of aviation academic material.

Accredited Flight School and Colleges

Although flight schools fall into two basic categories, Part 61 or Part 141, there is a third category that bears serious consideration by prospective pilots, particularly those planning a professional piloting career: nationally accredited pilot training institutions. Accredited flight schools must meet rigid standards of accountability for virtually every area of operation and must apply to an accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.
Aviation college degree programs also play a large part in today’s pilot training marketplace. If you are planning a professional flying career, an aviation degree may make you more competitive. A plus in seeking a degree is that in many cases you are eligible for financial aid and scholarships that will assist you, not only in your academic endeavors, but in flight training as well.

Flight School Check List

Pilots have a check list. A manual with instructions they follow all the time. So you should have a list too. Don’t base your decision on the literature you will collect from a flight school you are considering. You’re looking for informative substance, and this can be found as well in photocopied sheets as it can in full-color catalogs. While scrutinizing the material, take notes for use during the flight school visit, when you’ll check the veracity of its claims. Some things to look for:

  1. The school’s philosophy, goals, and objectives, and how they match your needs.
  2. Are there such benefits as housing, financial aid, and additional pilot training, such as aerobatics, that will broaden your experience?
  3. How important is flight training to the organization?
  4. How long has the flight school been in business?
  5. What about the school’s instructional staff, its enrollment numbers, and credentials?
  6. How many and what types of aircraft are used in the school’s flight instruction program?
  7. What are the school’s classrooms like?
  8. What services are available at its airport (instrument approaches and control towers)?
  9. What is the school’s reputation on flight regulations and safety policies?

Type of Flight Training Programs Offered

Have your questions ready when you are visiting flight schools of your choice. Before your meeting with flight instructors go around school and talk to pilot students enrolled in this flight school. Inquire about their experience.

Integrated vs. Modular pilot training

There are mainly two kind of pilot training, the integrated pilot training. It is kind of a full package to become an airline pilot as from little or no experience. Everything will be organized by the flight school. It is a full time pilot training (15 – 18 months) and it can be very intensive for some of the trainees. The main advantage is that you can focus on learning since everything is organized for you. The disadvantages are the price (more expensive) and working on top of that integrated pilot training is impossible. From my personal experience, the airlines prefer integrated trained pilots since I noticed that they found pilot jobs more easily than modular trained pilots.

Next is the modular pilot training, less expensive, longer (18 months +) and more demanding since you have to organize your modules one after each others. On top of that you will be in charge to book your aircraft, the instructors and also to apply for the exams. If you choose the modular training you really need to be organized! You will therefore lose some time to focus on your pilot training. The advantage of that modular pilot training is that you can be working at the same time. You are at the controls, you manage your time based on your professional and private activities.

Integrated Pilot Training:
  • More expensive
  • approx. 15-18 months
  • Full time training
  • Very intensive
  • Everything organized for you
  • Preferred by the airlines
  • Impossible to work at the same time
Modular Pilot Training:
  • Less expensive
  • 18 months +
  • based on your free time
  • You are in charge of the organization
  • Very demanding regarding organization
  • Possible to work at the same time

Note: Flight schools do not always provides modular and integrated pilot training. Some might only be providing modular pilot training. source

Flight School Question List for Interview

Sample of questions you might consider asking are:

How many flight instructors do you have and how many are full time vs. part time?

This is important because it will determine how available the instructors are. If most of the instructors are part-time, it means they have a full time job that will sometimes take precedence over your flight training. If your flight instructor is a part-timer, make sure your schedules mesh.

How many airplanes do you have available for flight training?

This is important because of availability. If there are only 1 or 2 airplanes available, you may not be able to schedule it when it’s most convenient for you. Having 3 or more airplanes available will increase the chances of you scheduling at your convenience.

How are your airplanes maintained?

There’s nothing more frustrating than showing up for a flight and then having to cancel due to a maintenance issue. Flight schools that have their own maintenance facility are good about keeping their airplanes in airworthy condition.

Which syllabus do you use for pilot training? Can I see a copy of it?

Schools that don’t follow a specific syllabus leave the training completely up to the instructor. In this case, find out which instructors are good about requiring their students to buy and follow a syllabus – because not all instructors do this.

Do you offer ground school classes? If not, how is ground school handled?

Most of the learning you will do will be on the ground. The flying is for practicing maneuvers and to develop your muscle memory. Since many instructors are interested in building up flight time, they will leave most of the ground school up to you. The ideal setup is a school that offers their own ground school. If you can’t find one, invest in a good home-study program available online or in pilot stores.

Do you have a chief flight instructor? Can I talk to him/her?

Having a chief flight instructor is a great sign because this means that the school takes flight training very seriously. Schools without a chief flight instructor usually have an ad hoc assortment of flight instructors, each doing their own thing. If you end up in a school without a chief flight instructor, the next step will be crucial.

Choose a Flight Instructor

Choosing a Flight Instructor is key when learning to fly. Try to look for an flight instructor that is not just trying to build up flight time or one who has been instructing for a few years. Make sure you are comfortable with him/her and make sure they follow a syllabus.

Finally, schedule a demostration flight, preferably with the flight instructor that you would be training with. This accomplishes a couple of things. First, it will give you an idea of what flying is like. Second, it will give you a chance to get the feel for your instructor and how comfortable you are with him/her.

Why choosing the right flight school and flight instructor is important

Most will agree that choosing the right flight school is a very important decision, but they won’t tell you why. This leaves people with a lack of understanding as to just how important this decision is. If you make the wrong decision, it could cost you thousands of dollars, waste time, and will possibly end up in you quitting and never achieving your dream of flying.

The reason people get frustrated and quit flying is that when they show up at a flight school, they have no idea what to expect or they have expectations that are completely off the mark with what actually happens.
If you want to fly as a hobby, you have to keep in mind that your certified flight instructor (CFI) is probably there to build up enough flight time to move into his/her next flying job, which is probably a regional airline job or small cargo company flying job.

This poor individual is getting paid a little over minimum wage and because they are interested in flying as a career, they take it very seriously and expect you to take it just as seriously. They will try to teach you to fly like an airline pilot, which is a little bit different than the type of flying you want to do. Flight instructors that have just graduated from a professional pilot program at a university are especially prone to want to teach you to fly like an airline pilot, when in fact, you have no interest in that type of flying.

Airline flying is very standardized since airline pilots need to do things the same way every time. A captain at an airline may fly with a co-pilot that he/she has never met before and will never meet again. Therefore, it’s crucial that all airline pilots are taught the same standardized procedures for operating the airplane.
You need to find a flight school with an instructor that will work with your way of learning and not treat you like an airline pilot wannabe. Try to determine your own learning style and your instructor’s teaching style as well as his/her motivation for flight instructing. Try to choose a CFI that likes to instruct because they enjoy teaching rather than someone who is there trying to build up flight time.

Source

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Different Types of Flight Schools and Flight Training Offered in US

Different Types of Flight Schools and Flight Training Offered in USWith a shortage of pilots evident in US, now is a good opportunity for students who ever thought of becoming a pilot.
U.S. airlines are facing what threatens to be their most serious pilot shortage since the 1960s, with higher experience requirements for new hires about to take hold just as the industry braces for a wave of retirements.

Federal mandates that took effect in 2013 require all newly hired pilots to have at least 1,500 hours of prior flight experience—six times the current minimum—raising the cost and time to train new fliers in an era when pay cuts and more-demanding schedules already have made the profession less attractive. Meanwhile, thousands of senior pilots at major airlines soon will start hitting the mandatory retirement age of 65.

Another federal safety rule that effect in early 2014, also will squeeze the supply, by giving pilots more daily rest time. This change is expected to force passenger airlines to increase their pilot ranks by at least 5%. Adding to the problem is a small but steady stream of U.S. pilots moving to overseas carriers, many of which already face an acute shortage of aviators and pay handsomely to land well-trained U.S. captains.

“This is going to come to a crisis,” said Bob Reding, recently retired executive vice president of operations at AMR Corp.’s American Airlines and now a consultant to FlightSafety International Inc., an aviation training provider.

With new strict requirements in flight training time, the decision to become a pilot should not be taken lightly. The career path to become a pilot requires commitment and financial resources to achieve your goal. Flight training is a very serious investment and should not be taken lightly. Do you research to find out which flight school to choose that will best suit your needs.

Choosing Flight School

With over 1,900 flight schools to pick from, you’ll have lots of options. But which one is right for you? It helps if you have an idea of what you want from aviation. Do you want to fly for fun, for business, or as a career?

What is common for most flight schools is that all of them have a chief flight instructor. This is the person in charge of all flight training and can be compared to the principle of an ordinary school. Depending on the size of the flight school this usually is a person with a lot of flight time and instruction time. Quite often they are retired airline pilots or ex-military pilots with a genuine interest in flying and flight training.

His or her job is to look after all the flight training with the school and you are likely to fly with him on stage checks or progression tests. Depending on the size of the school he may have own students.

Under the chief flight instructor you find from one to several assistant chief flight instructors. They are senior instructors with the flight school or have a lot of instruction time. Like the chief flight instructor they perform stage checks or progression tests. Often they are responsible for a certain area of the training, ex. private pilot courses or instrument rating courses. The assistant chief flight instructor(s) may have own students, and quite often teaching other instructor students due to their experience level.

Under the chief and his assistant(s) you find all the flight instructors. They do most of the training at the flight school. Depending on the instructor certificates held he or she will do most of the flight training with you. Many instructors are fresh out of flight school and work as instructors to build flight time. Unfortunately some are not very interested in instructing, so always pay attention to your instructor’s behavior in the beginning and go to your assistant chief flight instructor or chief flight instructor if you experience no progression. Sometimes the problem is the instructor, not you.

Dual Certificate school
These are flight schools offering certificates to more then just their national certificates. Good examples are schools in the United States offering training to both FAA (USA) and JAA (Europe) certificates. These are usually large flight schools and they may be offering it through partnering schools in other countries. Some even have courses leading to both FAA and JAA certificates. This is commonly done by making you an FAA pilot first and build up flight time in the United States (as a flight instructor, small cargo or banner pilot), before you go back to Europe for conversion to JAA. Even though this way usually is a little more expensive it is a good way to build flight time and get dual certificates.
Types of Flight Schools—Part 61 and Part 141 Schools, Flight Time, and Earning a Pilot Certificate
Flight schools come in two flavors, Part 61 and Part 141, which refer to the parts of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) under which they operate. The most common and least important distinction between them is the minimum flight time required for the private pilot certificate (sometimes called a pilot license)—40 hours under Part 61, and 35 hours under Part 141.

Considering that the national average for earning a private pilot certificate is 60-75 hours (how long you’ll take will depend on your ability and flying frequency), this difference isn’t important for initial pilot training. It does make a difference to commercial pilot applicants: Part 61 requires 250 hours, and Part 141 requires 190.

What differentiates the two is structure and accountability. Part 141 flight schools are periodically audited by the FAA and must have detailed, FAA-approved course outlines and meet student pilot performance rates. Part 61 schools don’t have the same paperwork and accountability requirements.

Learning under Part 61 rules can often give students the flexibility to rearrange flying lesson content and sequence to meet their needs, which can be of benefit to part-time students. Many Part 141 schools also train students under Part 61 rules. Source

Ground School, Distant Learning and Online School

In addition to all the flight schools you also have schools only offering the theory part. As there is a lot of reading involved to become a pilot some only offer this part. The benefit is you can get rid of all the written pretty fast and then concentrate on the flying. With distant learning and online schools you can also be anywhere in the world and still do their programs.

Especially pilots brushing up on lost knowledge (there is a lot to keep track of), flight instructors renewing their certificate or pilots converting from one nationality to another use ground, distant learning or online schools.

Also as many part 61 schools do not offer ground school classes and paying an instructor by the hour to teach you may be expensive, doing a class this way may be smart when starting your training.

Make A Summary Flight School Checklist

What flight school you ultimately choose depends on the quality flight training you desire in a method convenient to your schedule. In earning your private pilot certificate, you will have achieved a license to learn. Aviation is an ever-changing activity, and good pilots are always learning.

  • Determine your aviation goals. Are you learning to fly for fun or do you plan to pursue a career?
  • Compile a list of schools to examine, and request literature from each. Review material from each school and answer the questions outlined earlier here.
  • Once you’ve done your homework, visit the final two or three schools that pass the test. Ask questions and get a feel for the personalities of the schools. Ask specific questions and insist on specific answers. Talk to other students and flight instructors.
  • Once you’ve decided on a school, be sure a written agreement outlines the payment procedures.
  • Use online flight school directory to find a flight school near you.
Aviator Flight School in Florida

Location is very important when you are looking for a flight training school. Florida is a great place to earn your wings. The moderate and mild climate makes flight training a pleasure. The good weather allows you to log more flying hours faster, get your degree quicker and be on the way sooner to your new aviation career. Ft. Pierce is a small city with friendly people – without congested traffic on the ground or in the air.

Founded in 1982 Aviator Flight School offered opportunities to students looking to receive training to fulfill the specialized demands of the airline industry. The Aviator Flight School moved from Addison, Texas to its current location at the Fort Pierce, Florida, campus in 1999.The school has continued to grow and evolve. In 2009 Aviator became a college and expanded into the current 77,500 sq. ft. campus.

Since 1982, when the first students signed up for flight training, students at the Aviator Flight School have earned more than 20,000 FAA Licenses. From the beginning, Aviator has been committed to excellence in education. The majority of our graduate pilots are flying professionally in the U.S. and around the world.
Today we operate a fleet of more than 30 aircraft that fly over 30,000 hours yearly. As the Flight School advances and the alumni increase, the college remains focused on developing leaders and professionals in the aviation industry.

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Student Pilot License Information Guide

Student Pilot License Information GuideIf you are in the process of becoming a student pilot or already enrolled in flight training program, the information below will guide you in your preparation for an important 1st step in becoming a pilot. Before committing to flight training, pilot students should have a general idea of aviation industry, FAA-its governing and regulating authority, safety regulations, pilot certification process and be abreast of all news pertaining to pilots in general.

Role of the FAA

Congress empowered the FAA to foster aviation safety by prescribing safety standards for civil aviation. This is accomplished through the Code of Federal Regulations (CFRs). Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 61 pertains to the certification of pilots, flight instructors, and ground instructors. This prescribes the eligibility, aeronautical knowledge, flight proficiency, and experience required for each type of pilot certificate issued.

Flight Standards District Offices (FSDOs)

Throughout the world, the FAA has approximately 100 Flight Standards District Offices and International Field Offices, commonly referred to as “FSDOs” and “IFOs.” Through these offices, information and services are provided for the aviation community.

The Student Pilot

The first step in becoming a pilot is to select a type of aircraft. FAA rules for getting a pilot’s certificate differ depending on the type of aircraft flown. Individuals can choose among airplanes, gyroplanes, weight-shift, helicopters, powered parachutes, gliders, balloons, or airships. A pilot does not need a certificate to fly ultralight vehicles.

Basic Requirements

A student pilot is one who is being trained by an instructor pilot for his or her first full certificate, and is permitted to fly alone (solo) under specific, limited circumstances. Upon request, an FAA-authorized aviation medical examiner (AME) will issue a combined medical certificate and Student Pilot Certificate after completion of a physical examination.
Student Pilot Certificates may be issued by an FAA inspector or an FAA-designated pilot examiner. To be eligible for a Student Pilot’s Certificate, an individual must be:

  • Be 16 years old (14 years old to pilot a glider or balloon).
  • Be able to read, write, speak, and understand English.
  • Hold a current Third-Class Medical Certificate (or for glider or balloon, certify no medical defect exists that would prevent piloting a balloon or glider)
Choosing a Flight School

Most airports have facilities for flight training conducted by flight schools or individual flight instructors. A school will usually provide a wide variety of training material, special facilities, and greater flexibility in scheduling.
Many colleges and universities also provide flight training as a part of their curricula. There are two types of flight schools catering to primary general aviation needs. One is normally referred to as a certificated “part 141 school” and the other as a “part 61 school.” A part 141 flight school has been granted an Air Agency Certificate by the FAA. The certificated schools may qualify for a ground school rating and a flight school rating. In addition, the school may be authorized to give their graduates practical (flight) tests and knowledge (computer administered written) tests.

The most common and least important distinction between them is the minimum flight time required for the private pilot certificate (sometimes called a pilot license)—40 hours under Part 61, and 35 hours under Part 141. What differentiates the two is structure and accountability. Part 141 schools are periodically audited by the FAA and must have detailed, FAA-approved course outlines and meet student pilot performance rates. Part 61 schools don’t have the same paperwork and accountability requirements.

Enrollment in a certificated school usually ensures quality and continuity of training. These schools meet prescribed standards with respect to equipment, facilities, personnel, and curricula.
Once the flight school is chosen Ground and flight training should be obtained as regularly and frequently as possible. This assures maximum retention of instruction and the achievement of requisite proficiency.

The Role of the Flight Instructor

The student pilot’s training program depends upon the quality of the ground and flight training received. An instructor should possess an understanding of the learning process, a knowledge of the fundamentals of teaching, and the ability to communicate effectively with the student pilot. During the certification process, a flight instructor applicant is tested on a practical application of these skills in specific teaching situations. The quality of instruction, and the knowledge and skills acquired from your flight instructor will affect your entire flying career whether you plan to pursue it as a vocation or an avocation.

The FAA has adopted an operational training concept that places the full responsibility for student training on the flight instructor. In this role, the flight instructor assumes total responsibility for training you to meet the standards required for certification within an ever-changing operating environment. The flight instructor will provide you guidance, and arrange for your academic and flight training lessons.

It is therefore extremely important to do your research. Get impartial opinions of the flight school and/or flight instructor you intend to employ.

What Flight Training Requires

A course of instruction should include the ground and flight training necessary to acquire the knowledge and skills required to safely and efficiently function as a certificated pilot. Whether you attend a part 141 or part 61 school or obtain the services of an individual flight instructor, the specific knowledge and skill areas for each category and class of aircraft are outlined in Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) mentioned above.

Medical Requirements

Pilots, except those who fly gliders or free air balloons, must possess a valid medical certificate in order to exercise the privileges of their airman certificates. Sport pilots must possess either a valid third-class medical certificate or a valid driver’s license.

The periodic medical examination required for medical certification is conducted by designated aviation medical examiners, who are physicians with a special interest in aviation safety and have training in aviation medicine.
The standards for medical certification are contained in 14 CFR part 67. The requirements for obtaining medical certification are contained in 14 CFR part 61.

Prior to beginning flight training, a flight instructor should interview you about any health conditions and determine your goal as a pilot. Good advice would be to obtain the class of medical certificate required, for the certificate level you ultimately want, before beginning flight training. Finding out immediately whether you are medically qualified could save time and money.

Study Materials For Pilot

The FAA develops and makes available to the public various sources of aeronautical information. Some of this information is free; other information is available at a nominal cost. Of particular interest and value to those persons getting started in flying are: FAA-H-8083-27A, Student Pilot Guide; FAA-H-8083-3, Airplane Flying Handbook; FAA-H-8083-25, Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge; Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM); and Practical Test Standards (PTSs). In addition, many aviation publications are available from commercial sources.

Suggested Study Materials
  • 14 CFR parts 1, 61, 67, and 91
  • Aeronautical Information Manual
  • AC 00-6, Aviation Weather
  • AC 00-45, Aviation Weather Services
  • FAA-H-8083-1, Pilot’s Weight and Balance
  • FAA-H-8083-3, Airplane Flying Handbook
  • FAA-H-8083-11, Balloon Flying Handbook
  • FAA-H-8083-13, Glider Flying Handbook
  • FAA-H-8083-21, Rotorcraft Flying Handbook
  • FAA-H-8083-25, Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge
  • FAA-S-8081-3, Recreational Pilot Practical Test Standards
  • FAA-S-8081-14, Private Pilot Practical Test Standards (Airplane)
  • FAA-S-8081-29, Sport Pilot Practical Test Standards (Airplane,
  • Gyroplane, Glider and Flight Instructor)
  • FAA-S-8081-30, Sport Pilot Practical Test Standards (Airship,
  • Balloon, and Flight Instructor)
  • FAA-S-8081-31, Sport Pilot Practical Test Standards (Weight Shift
  • Control, Powered Parachute, and Flight Instructor)
  • FAA-S-8081-32, Private Pilot Practical Test Standards (Powered
  • Parachute and Weight Shift Control)
  • http://www.faasafety.gov
How to Obtain Study Materials

The current Flight Standards Service airman training and testing material and questions banks for all airman certificates and ratings can be obtained from the Regulatory Support Division’s web site.

When to Take the Knowledge Test

Like any other test, FAA knowledge tests are intended to inspect or access students aeronautical knowledge and skills achieved during training. Experience has shown that the knowledge test is more meaningful to the applicant, and is more likely to result in a satisfactory grade, if it is taken after beginning the flight portion of the training. For optimum benefit, it is recommended that the knowledge test be taken after the student has completed a solo cross-country flight. The operational knowledge gained by this experience can be used to the student’s advantage in the knowledge test. Your instructor will be the best indicator of your preparedness for the test.

Where to Take the Knowledge Test

FAA-Designated Computer Testing Centers have been certificated to administer FAA knowledge tests. Applicants will be charged a fee for the administration of FAA knowledge tests. Test registration numbers and a complete list of test centers can be downloaded from the Regulatory Support Division’s web site. SOURCE -FAA.gov regulations

Pilot Training Program With Aviator Flight Training Academy 259 Flight Hours

Aviator Flight Training Academy offers professional pilot training programs with a minimum of 200 hours of multi-engine time. The flight school has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator), large classrooms and individual briefing rooms.

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Are You Ready To Begin Flight Training

Are You Ready To Begin Flight TrainingCareer pilot is as challenging as it is rewarding. Like any other field, aviation has many paths to offer and all depends on what long term goals you want to achieve. Your choice of a flight school might depend on whether you are planning to obtain a sport pilot certificate, recreational pilot certificate, private pilot certificate, or whether you intend to pursue a career as a professional pilot.

Another consideration is whether you will train part time or full time. Do not make the mistake of making your determination based on financial concerns alone. The quality of training you receive is very important. Prior to making a final decision, visit the school you are considering, and talk with management, instructors, and students. Evaluate the items on the checklist you developed, and then take time to think things over before making your decision.

Ground and flight training should be obtained as regularly and frequently as possible. This assures maximum retention of instruction and the achievement of requisite proficiency.

The Role of the Instructor

The student pilot’s training program depends upon the quality of the ground and flight training received. A flight instructor should possess an understanding of the learning process, a knowledge of the fundamentals of teaching, and the ability to communicate effectively with the student pilot. During the certification process, a flight instructor applicant is tested on a practical application of these skills in specific teaching situations. The quality of instruction, and the knowledge and skills acquired from your flight instructor will affect your entire flying career whether you plan to pursue it as a vocation or an avocation.

What Flight Training Requires

A course of instruction should include the ground and flight training necessary to acquire the knowledge and skills required to safely and efficiently function as a certificated pilot. Whether you attend a part 141 or part 61 school or obtain the services of an individual flight instructor, the specific knowledge and skill areas for each category and class of aircraft are outlined in Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR). Refer to 14 CFR part 61, subpart J for the requirements of a sport pilot certificate. Refer to 14 CFR part 61, subpart D for the requirements of a recreational pilot certificate. Refer to 14 CFR part 61, subpart E for the requirements of a private pilot certificate.

Medical Requirements for Flight Training

Pilots, except those who fly gliders or free air balloons, must possess a valid medical certificate in order to exercise the privileges of their airman certificates. Sport pilots must possess either a valid third-class medical certificate or a valid driver’s license. The periodic medical examination required for medical certification is conducted by designated aviation medical examiners, who are physicians with a special interest in aviation safety and have training in aviation medicine. The standards for medical certification are contained in 14 CFR part 67. The requirements for obtaining medical certification are contained in 14 CFR part 61.

Prior to beginning flight training, a flight instructor should interview you about any health conditions and determine your goal as a pilot. Good advice would be to obtain the class of medical certificate required, for the certificate level you ultimately want, before beginning flight training. Finding out immediately whether you are medically qualified could save time and money.

Flight Training FAQ for Pilot Students
How and Where Can I Get a Student Pilot Certificate?

An aviation medical examiner (AME) typically gives you a student pilot certificate to fill out as part of the third class medical exam. Your flight instructor will likely refer you to a local AME, or you can find an examiner online using AOPA’s database of AME’s searchable by city and state. A student pilot certificate is valid for 24 calendar months and a third class medical could be valid for up to 36 months, depending on your age at the time of your AME visit. If your student pilot certificate expires first, you can get a new one from a designated pilot examiner (DPE) or your local Flight Standards District Office (FSDO).

What Are Different Pilot Certificates?

Pilot Certificates issued by the FAA have the following characteristics:
Grade – determines the kinds of flying a pilot can do

  1. Student Pilot – local solo training flights without passengers
  2. Recreational Pilot – local uncontrolled day flights 1 passenger
  3. Private Pilot – flights worldwide with passengers, non-profit
  4. Commercial Pilot – paid flying allowed, can be airline copilot
  5. Airline Transport Pilot – paid flights, can be airline captain
How Long Does It Take to Learn to Fly and Get a Pilot Certificate?

The same variables that affect the cost of learning to fly will affect the time it takes to earn your certificate. The FAA has established the minimum number of flight hours needed to obtain a certificate. Under Part 61 of the federal aviation regulations, the minimums are 20 hours for a sport pilot certificate, 30 hours for a recreational certificate, and 40 hours for a private pilot certificate. Some schools operate under an alternate regulation, Part 141, which provides more FAA oversight, more rigid schedules, and more paperwork. The added requirements allow them to reduce the minimum hours of private pilot training to 35 hours. However, many schools believe that a true average flight training time for a private pilot is between 50 hours and 60 hours, whether the school operates under Part 61 or Part 141 schools. Others believe that 68 to 70 hours is the more likely average. These flight hours can be spread over a time span of several months to a year or more.

What Are the Differences Between a Part 61 and a Part 141 Flight School?

Part 141 flight schools have more FAA oversight, more rigid schedules, and more paperwork. For the added requirements, they are allowed to reduce the minimum required hours of private pilot training to 35 hours, rather than the 40-hour minimum required when training at a Part 61 flight school. The Part 61 school, on the other hand, is able to be more flexible with training schedules, and has the ability to tailor the curriculum to meet individual students’ training needs. Either school must train you to pass the very same practical test.

When Can I Fly Solo?

A: Your certified flight instructor (CFI) will carefully monitor your progress and, once you are both comfortable with your performance, the CFI will clear you to begin “solo” flights under his/her supervision. During solo flights you will fly the aircraft without anyone else on board – not even the instructor. Your first solo typically includes three take-offs and landings, and generally occurs within the first 25 hours of training.

When F1 Visa Is Required

An F1 visa is issued to international students who are attending an academic program or English Language Program at a US collge or university. F-1 students must maintain the minimum course load for full-time student status. They can remain in the US up to 60 days beyond the length of time it takes to complete their academic program. In addition, an F1 student can remain for 12 months after securing a degree to work under the OPT (Optional Practical Training) program. F1 students are expected to complete their studies by the expiration date on their I-20 form (Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant Student Status) which is provided by the US college or university that the student has been accepted to and will attend.

Five Facts About Flight Training

  • FACT: The current recession has created fierce competition for jobs in all industries. Now is the perfect opportunity for you to start your flight training in an industry that has tremendous potential!
  • FACT: Airline jobs are not going away, the demand is beginning to increase. For many current airline pilots, the mandatory retirement age is approaching!
  • FACT: The FAA is now taking a more serious look at airline pilot flight training. This is forcing the airline industry to take a harder look at candidates for pilot replacements!
  • FACT: Professional Pilots must now have first-rate knowledge and continually upgraded skills if they want to hear the word “Hired!” Pilots who train at quality aviation schools and who possess the technical knowledge, first-rate flying skills and a professional attitude will have the hiring edge!
  • FACT: Professionalism and knowledge are now prerequisites for entrance into the worldwide airline industry. Fast paced, “fast track” programs, or self-study courses will not meet the new airline industry standards.

Why Choose Aviator Flight School For Your Pilot Training
  • Licensed by the State of Florida Commission For Independent Education License #4155
    Aviator Flight Training Academy is a Division of Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology, which is licensed by the State of Florida Commission for Independent Education and Accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges.
  • 27 Years in the Flight Training Industry
    To date, Aviator has trained over 5000 pilots for the commercial airline industry
  • Only School Offering 200 Hours of Multi-Engine Time
    Aviator is the only flight school that has a full 200 hours of multi-engine time included in our program
  • No Flight Training Devices (Simulators)
    FTDs are not used towards your flight time for any ratings
  • Approved by the Federal Department of Education to offer Title IV Loans
    Aviator has the ability to offer students federal funding on approved accredited programs
  • Job Placement Assistance with Regional Airlines
    Aviator offers job placement assistance for our graduates
  • “A” Rating with United States Better Business Bureau
  • Classroom Environment – All classes taught in our educational center, NOT online

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Researching Aviation Colleges in US

Researching Aviation Colleges in USThe time has come for young people with a dream to fly or fix airplanes. The shortage of pilot and aviation mechanics offers students entering the aviation field a great opportunity and a brighter future. Career opportunities in the aviation industry require varied amounts of education. For example, flight attendants or aircraft maintenance technicians may only need a certificate or associate’s degree, while pilots and air traffic controllers may need a bachelor’s degree. Those interested in working as airport managers or aviation researchers may need a master’s degree. Additionally, aspiring aviation students may need to attend a school with specialized aviation training facilities.

Colleges are all about research, learning and education. To apply for college and begin preparing for a career requires a general understanding of fields available in aviation. Learn about educational programs in the aviation field, including undergraduate and graduate certificate and degree programs. Find out about the courses offered in these programs.
Aviation Science Colleges and Universities in the U.S.

Aviation science is the study of human-crafted, air-borne devices and the regulatory laws that govern the devices and people who are associated with construction and operation of the devices. Many colleges and universities in the U.S. offer various degree programs in aviation science.

How to Select an Aviation Science School

Aviation science schools may allow and promote hands-on experiences to help its students develop practical knowledge about the aviation industry. Schools that possess aviation technology labs and aircraft simulators can provide direct instruction to an aviation science student. Some aviation science universities may offer more technologically advanced facilities than others, and this may be a consideration for the prospective student.
The level of professional experience of an aviation science college’s faculty can influence a prospective aviation student. In aviation science programs, it is important for students to learn about aviation operations, aircraft structure and aircraft performance and design from someone who has formal up-to-date knowledge and experience in the aviation field.

Aviation science programs are offered to suit different career options in the aviation industry and are available at the certificate as well as the associate’s and bachelor’s degree levels, so students may want to select a school accordingly. Many aviation science universities have degree concentrations in aviation maintenance, aviation management, aviation meteorology and air traffic control. For students interested in becoming pilots, some aviation universities offer pilot technology programs that can lead to a Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) certificate; the certificate can lead to possible employment with regional and corporate aviation companies.

Certificate in Aviation Technology

Some technical schools and community colleges offer certificate programs in aviation technology that cover basic concepts in air traffic control, aircraft repair and piloting. These programs prepare graduates for more advanced study in the field or entry-level careers. Some certificate programs instruct on several aspects of the discipline, while other emphasize a specific facet, like aircraft electronics or aircraft frame maintenance.

Program Coursework
The classes offered in aviation technology certificate programs teach the scientific and mathematical fundamentals behind air travel. Students learn the basic theoretical and practical skills of the aviation industry. Courses on the following subjects are often required:

  • Aircraft frame maintenance
  • Aircraft blueprints
  • Aircraft electronics
  • Propeller maintenance
  • Aviation mathematics
  • Popular Career Options

Earning a certificate in aviation technology prepares graduates for entry-level careers in aircraft exterior maintenance, airline customer service and aircraft electronics repair. Some careers to choose:

  • Flight attendant
  • Aircraft maintenance technician
  • Airport customer service representative

To provide a salary perspective for one such option, aircraft mechanics and service technicians brought in median annual pay of $55,210 in 2012 and can expect a 6% increase in jobs from 2010-2020, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), http://www.bls.gov.

Associate of Applied Science in Aviation Management

Associate of Applied Science (AAS) programs in aviation management often focus on a specific area of the field, such as air traffic control, flight training or flight management. Programs cover the business and management aspects of aviation in addition to the technical and mechanical facets. Students gain practical experience through simulations and hands-on work with industry equipment.

Program Coursework

AAS aviation programs teach students to work with several current aircraft makes and models. Classes at this level cover the business, technical and personnel areas of air travel. Topics include:

  • Air travel safety
  • History of aviation
  • Commercial piloting
  • Airport management
  • Air traffic control
Popular Career Options

Those with an associate’s degree in aviation qualify for a number of careers in the air travel and air cargo industries. Graduates can work for airports, commercial airlines or air freighters. The careers noted below are popular options:
Air traffic control assistant
Air cargo transporter
Airport management assistant

Bachelor of Science in Aviation Management

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) programs for aviation management usually offer a more specialized curriculum than certificate or associate’s degree programs. Students take advanced coursework in areas such as aircraft repair, piloting or aviation management. Programs offer a combination of classroom instruction and simulated or hands-on practice.

Educational Prerequisites

Since most fields in aviation technology require employees to have strong mathematics and science skills, bachelor’s degree programs seek applicants who have completed advanced coursework in subjects like calculus, geometry, physics and chemistry. Applicants also need to meet unique program standards for grade point average and college entrance examination scores. Holding a high school diploma or its equivalent is mandatory.

Program Coursework

Aviation school programs offer courses in flight theory, aircraft systems, crew resource management (CRM), meteorology, air traffic control and global navigation. Classroom training is substantially supplemented by flight labs, in which students undergo hands-on training via sophisticated flight simulators. Classes on the following topics are usually offered:

  • Flight simulation
  • Aviation operation control
  • Law and regulation in aviation
  • Commercial pilot fundamentals
  • Air traffic control methods

Popular Career Options

B.S. in Aviation Management programs prepare graduates for administrative and technical careers in the air travel and air cargo industries. Some advanced aviation positions may require several years of work experience. Many graduates become:

  • Commercial pilots
  • Air traffic controllers
  • Airline business managers

Narrowing Your Research To A Specific Aviation College

Choose 2 or 3 regionally accredited colleges with aviation programs that include training for the career you want. If air traffic control or flying are among your serious interests, be sure to choose a program that meets Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) guidelines. The FAA may even have certified it as a ‘Collegiate Training Initiative’ program.
See if the school is associated with an airport or large aviation business, since such schools tend to provide more internship opportunities. It is important to schedule a visit prior to selecting your flight school or aviation college.
http://education-portal.com/colleges_with_aviation_programs.html

Aviation Research and Locator

http://www.flyingmag.com/pilots-places/aviation-colleges
http://flighttraining.aopa.org/learntofly/school/aviation_colleges/
https://www.faa.gov/education/student_resources/schools_universities/
http://www.flightschoollist.com/aviation-college.php

Aviator College Degree Program

Approved by the FAA for a Restricted ATP Certificate at 1250 hours

2 year Associates Degree Program

The Aeronautical Science Program prepares the graduate for a career in the aviation industry by providing a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, aeronautical sciences, aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry. The graduate will receive an Associate of Science Degree from Aviator College with flight ratings from private pilot through commercial, with Flight Instructor ratings. This training is necessary to obtain employment, and by completing the associate’s degree you will set yourself apart from other applicants since a degree is preferred in the airline industry.

The flight portion of the program consists of a minimum of 565 flight hours and more multi-engine time than any other college or flight school today. Our large multi-engine fleet is equipped with Garmin 430s, and ASPEN EFIS is being introduced. Single engine fleet consists of Piper Warrior III with all glass (EFIS systems). Ground school is taught in a classroom environment.

The school’s14 acre campus encompasses 37,000 sq. ft. Administration & Academic training facility is open from 7 am to 6 pm daily. The Flight Operations building is open 24/7 daily, rain or shine.

Online Enrollment
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Flight Training Environment in US Pilot Schools

Flight Training Environment in US Pilot SchoolsThere are about 3,400 pilot schools operating in the United States. The most basic difference among the types of schools is the flight training environment provided to the students. For the reporting purposes of our study, we divided them into three categories:

  1. non-collegiate flight instructor-based schools
  2. non-collegiate vocational pilot schools,
  3. collegiate aviation schools.
Non-Collegiate Flight Instructor-Based School (Part 61).

Pilot training conducted under Part 61 regulations is often provided by an individual, for-hire flight instructor who can operate independently as a single-instructor school at a local airport with a single aircraft on which to train students. Other flight instructor-based schools operate as a more traditional training school with a small, physical facility located at a particular airport. These schools are the most common type. The majority of students that complete training in non-collegiate, flight instructor-based schools are generally interested in recreational flying, although most commercial pilots in the United States also undertake this type of training as the initial path toward becoming an airline pilot. Flight instructor-based schools offer flexible training environments to meet specific students’ needs as long as they pass the final tests. These schools are not subject to direct FAA oversight beyond the initial certification and subsequent renewal of the flight instructor’s certificate. However, flight instructors may be inspected by FAA when a triggering event occurs regarding the training being provided, such as being involved in an aircraft accident.

Non-Collegiate Vocational Pilot Schools (Part 141)

Vocational schools elect to apply for an operating certificate from FAA to provide pilot training under Part 141 regulations. Part 141 regulations require these schools to meet prescribed standards with respect to training equipment, facilities, student records, personnel, and curriculums. Vocational schools must have structured and formalized programs and have their detailed training course outlines or curriculums approved by FAA. Curriculums can vary in content, but FAA provides fundamental core training guidelines that must be followed within the curriculum for the school to receive a certificate. These schools do not allow the flexibility of flight instructor-based schools as the training sequence outlined in the curriculum cannot be altered. FAA requires annual inspections of these schools, unlike flight instructor-based schools.

Collegiate aviation schools (Part 61 or Part 141).

Pilot training is also provided through 2-and 4-year colleges and universities, which typically offer an undergraduate aviation-based degree along with the pilot certificates and ratings necessary to become a commercial pilot.
In general, most of the collegiate aviation schools provide pilot training under a Part 141 certificate, although they can provide training under Part 61. Collegiate schools that provide training under Part 61 regulations generally offer similar structured, curriculum- based training as collegiate schools with a Part 141 certificate. Source

Choosing a Pilot School

While most of the research is done on the internet, the decision to choose a flight school cannot be made based on the information you see on the website or the literature you download or request by mail. It is highly recommended to visit the flight school you are considering so you can interview flight instructors, attending students and inquire about the flight training programs in detail.

When you schedule a visit with flight school, your first contact will likely be an admissions officer or the chief flight instructor. Listen closely and ask questions about everything. If you don’t understand something, ask! During your tour, ensure that no area is left unvisited, from administrative offices to the maintenance area.

Interview the flight school’s chief flight instructor or his or her assistant. Some questions to ask:

  1. Are progressive flight checks given? (These checks evaluate your progress during the pilot training program.)
  2. What’s the instructor-to-student ratio? (Generally speaking, an instructor can adequately educate four of five full-time students, or 10 or more part-timers, depending on their schedules.)
  3. Who schedules flying lessons, and how is it done?
  4. What are the insurance requirements of the school, and how do its liability and collision policies work? Will you be responsible for a deductible, and how much is that deductible in the event of a loss? What is your coverage as a student pilot?
  5. Who keeps your records? (This is important because poor documentation can cause you to repeat training.)
  6. What happens when weather or maintenance problems cancel a flying lesson? Who’s responsible for rescheduling lessons and reporting maintenance problems? Source

After the official tour, try to talk to other students in flight training. Ask them to rate the training’s quality and explain what problems they’ve had, if any, and how they were dealt with.

Other important flight training information resources can be the local FAA flight standards district office, the Better Business Bureau, and the Chamber of Commerce. They may offer important insights on such topics as a school’s safety record and business practices. Don’t forget such applicable sources as the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, National Air Transportation Association, Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges of Technology, if so accredited, and the Immigration and Naturalization Service, if you are an international student.

Why Choose Aviator Flight School For Your Pilot Training
  • Licensed by the State of Florida Commission For Independent Education License #4155
  • Aviator Flight Training Academy is a Division of Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology, which is licensed by the State of Florida Commission for Independent Education and Accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges.
  • 27 Years in the Flight Training Industry. To date, Aviator has trained over 5000 pilots for the commercial airline industry.
  • Only School Offering 200 Hours of Multi-Engine Time
  • Aviator is the only flight school that has a full 200 hours of multi-engine time included in our program
  • No Flight Training Devices (Simulators)
  • FTDs are not used towards your flight time for any ratings
  • Approved by the Federal Department of Education to offer Title IV Loans
  • Aviator has the ability to offer students federal funding on approved accredited programs
  • Job Placement Assistance with Regional Airlines
  • Aviator offers job placement assistance for our graduates
  • “A” Rating with United States Better Business Bureau
  • Classroom Environment – All classes taught in our educational center, NOT online

Contact Aviator
Schedule a Visit

Passing Your 1st Checkride in Flight School

Passing Your 1st Checkride in Flight SchoolIf you did your research right and chose a solid flight school with FAA approved flight training curriculum and expert flight instructors you are on the right track to getting your pilot license.

The Purpose of Mock Checkrides

You’ve been studying and training hard to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to reach your goal of becoming a private pilot, and your flight instructor just announced it’s time to schedule a mock checkride. Congratulations! This means you are approaching the finish line of your initial training. And by scheduling you for a mock checkride, your CFI is accomplishing two important things: validating his or her opinion that you are fully prepared for the checkride, while providing you with a realistic dress rehearsal in preparation for the official checkride /home/flight-training-programs/individual-flight-training-courses.aspx with a designated pilot examiner (DPE).

Some CFIs conduct mock checkrides with their students in order to get a first-hand glimpse of a student’s performance under a quasi-checkride atmosphere. This can be effective for both student and CFI if the CFI truly maintains a DPE-like role throughout the experience. However, it is often difficult to produce and maintain a realistic checkride environment once a student/CFI relationship becomes as comfortable and familiar as they typically do. But more important, an overly relaxed environment eliminates the benefit of having to perform for a different person—possibly for the first time—all of the checkride’s required tasks.

For a mock checkride to be really effective it must include an entire checkride experience as much as possible—not just a mock flight test. It is unfortunate that some CFIs will conduct a mock checkride that concentrates mainly on the flight maneuvers, spending little time on the oral portion of the exam. And on checkride day, before the practical test can even begin, the DPE’s first obligation is to confirm that the applicant is qualified for the checkride; all too often, that answer is no! So the person conducting the mock checkride should begin by reviewing the pilot’s logbook—including ground and flight training records, student pilot certificate, and any required endorsements—to confirm that all prerequisites for the checkride have been accomplished and properly recorded.

Next, the student should be prepared to confidently present and discuss all required aircraft documents, maintenance logs, and records, demonstrating the proposed aircraft is ready for a safe and legal flight. Students who arrive on checkride day confused about this detail demonstrate an unfortunate lack of attention to this important task.
Since DPEs present scenario-based questioning throughout a practical test, the most effective and helpful mock oral exams will provide the student with a wide variety of scenarios in each area of operation. Doing this more accurately tests the depth of the student’s knowledge, and demonstrates the more realistic testing environment the DPE will create. While a student might be able to quickly and accurately respond to rote questions about airspace rules, for example, a solid understanding of how various airspace and VFR minimums apply to each other (correlation) is quickly assessed by asking a few scenario-style questions. DPEs are well practiced at determining the level of correlative learning through scenario-based questions, so effective mock checkrides should, too.

As for the flight portion, be sure to cover all of the required tasks that will be expected during the real checkride—not just the areas you believe will be the toughest. All too often, an applicant who received an abbreviated mock checkride does fine on everything except the one or two areas that had been overlooked.  Source

Having a mock checkride allows you to discover whether you performed the minimum prescribed PTS tolerances. If you did not, the price of the mock checkride will be worth every penny because it will allow you to work on your performance, correct mistakes and improve your chances of passing the check ride.

Checkride Preparation With Practical Test Standards (PTS)

By the end of your pilot training you’re faced with a check ride. Now its performance time to evaluate what you have learned pertaining to the rating you’re attempting to achieve. You are expected to perform precision maneuvers under the watchful eye of an experienced pilot examiner. The only way you will pass is by studying the material and practicing the maneuvers.

While there is a little room for error, some components are absolutely essential to get right both in the oral portion of the exam and during the flight test. And you can maximize your chances of acing your check ride by carefully studying the Practical Test Standards (PTS), published for each FAA rating.

The PTS is the FAA examiner’s bible. He or she must comply with the rules within the book and cannot test anything that is not included in the publication. There are several sections of particular importance. The first is called “Special Emphasis Area” and it highlights several safety related components that you need to be aware of. For example, one component is collision avoidance. If the examiner notices that you are not scanning for traffic during your checkride, he or she could technically give you the dreaded pink slip.

Other sections to pay extra attention to are the ones titled “Satisfactory Performance” and “Unsatisfactory Performance.” They tell you very clearly what you should and shouldn’t do if you want to pass your test. The PTS also states that you are expected to use a checklist and that it is the examiner’s job to attempt to distract you during the exam to test your ability to divide your attention while maintaining control of the airplane.

If you are applying for an additional rating, there is a table in the PTS that shows which sections of the PTS will be tested. There is also a handy checklist of equipment and documents that you need to bring to the exam. And it doesn’t hurt to go over the examiner’s checklist, too.

By reading the PTS cover to cover, you can make sure that there won’t be any surprises during the checkride. You can download the Practical Test Standards for all ratings on the FAA website, but if you prefer to get the information in print there are several publishers, including ASA and Jeppesen. Source

Top Reasons For Not Passing Your Checkrides
  1. Weather. The most common weakness during the oral exam is an inability to effectively interpret aviation weather charts, reports, and forecasts.
  2. Airspace. Many unsuccessful applicants arrive on checkride day with only a vague, rote level of knowledge regarding the various airspace details.
  3. Emergency landing. The many variables that make each engine-failure scenario unique also make the task of demonstrated emergency approach and landing especially challenging to master. Successful applicants consider several variables—nature of the emergency; altitude available; potential landing sites; and wind and surface conditions—while taking positive and timely corrective actions necessary to maximize the safety of the flight, never placing the flight in any undue, additional risk.
  4. Landings. Much has been said and written about the various landing maneuvers required for the private pilot checkride: normal, crosswind, soft-field, short-field, forward slip, and go-around. But the most important advice is proper practice, and lots of it! Proper means practice it correctly—not sloppily—so you won’t be learning bad habits from the start.
  5. Stalls. Next in line are the dreaded power-on and power-off stalls and spin awareness. While spin demonstrations are not called for on the checkride, most applicants are not only aware of spins, they are terrified of them. Knowing spins are the result of poorly coordinated stalls and stall-recovery attempts, students are often loath to practice stalls.
  6. Navigation. The last problem area on our hit list is, ironically, the first task typically demonstrated after departing the traffic pattern: cross-country navigation using pilotage skills. The biggest problem with this task often comes as a result of selecting inappropriate visual checkpoints along the planned route of flight. Source
Florida Flight School and Flight Training Programs

For more than 31 years Aviator has been the leader in multi-engine flight training. We have provided over 5000 professional pilots to the airline industry, both nationally and worldwide, through our Professional Pilot Flight Training Programs. Our FAA-certified Part 141 approved flight programs provide students with the skills and experience demanded by today’s commercial aviation industry. Aviator is accredited by the ACCSC (Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges).

Our Professional Pilot Program is set in a flight training, structured environment to ensure the student receives the knowledge that is required to be a professional pilot. This program is from 0 hours to over 250 hours, of which 200 hours will be multi-engine time. The program includes Private Pilot Single Engine through the Multi-Engine Flight Instructor Certificate. Cross Country flying is coast-to-coast, if desired.

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Aviator CFI, call 772-672-8222.
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