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Why You Need a College Degree

Why You Need a College DegreeEducated workers are becoming increasingly valuable for two reasons: Many lower-skilled jobs are being shipped overseas, and computers do much of the mundane, repetitive work now. What’s left are more complex tasks that require people to solve problems and work together, according to Tony Carnevale, director of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce.

“Skills that used to be reserved for senior technical people or managers are more and more required” of everyone, says Carnevale. “It’s less a matter of standing in front of a machine and doing the same thing over and over again” and more about “exploiting the machine, interacting with customers and interacting with your co-workers.”

As a result, workers across a range of occupations need better communication and problem-solving skills than they used to.

College-educated people not only tend to have higher earnings than people without degrees, they are also more likely to have health and retirement benefits with their jobs, and they are far less likely to be unemployed. And having a degree is not just about economic advantages. People with college degrees are more likely to be satisfied with their jobs. They are more likely to read to their children, which helps their kids be better prepared for school than other children. People with degrees are also healthier.

On average, earnings increase for every degree someone gets, and the jumps are particularly large when people get graduate degrees. A person with a professional degree tends to make nearly twice as much as someone with just a bachelor’s degree.

The fact that there is such a big payoff for degrees is why there’s so much at stake in getting students to finish college, and in encouraging dropouts to come back.

The percentage of Americans who have college degrees has been rising. About 32 percent of people ages 25 to 34 have degrees from four-year colleges, up from 24 percent in the early 1980s. If you look at all adults in America, about 40 percent have some kind of college degree. source

Degree Matters For A Pilot

The actual degree program does not matter no matter what a particular college or university may tell you. The important part of having a degree is showing to the airline that you were able to meet the academic requirements as part of completing college. As an airline pilot, you endure recurrent training (training required annually), initial training (training on a new airplane) and upgrade training (transitioning from first officer to captain). So essentially, you spend most of your career studying new systems, procedures and techniques until the day you retire. The airlines want to know that you have good study habits and your success, or lack thereof, in college will show the airline how well you learn.

A degree in Aeronautical Science is as much a bachelors degree as one in Applied Astrophysics. As back up, you can minor in a non aviation degree to have more options.

Why Does a College Degree Matter?

When asked about why a major airline company may hire a certain pilot with a degree vs. a pilot with flight experience, here how he explained it.

Well, the short answer is that if XYZ Airlines wanted to hire 500 pilots and didn’t specify anything other than requiring the applicant to have a commercial pilot certificate or ATP rating, they would probably receive at least 25,000 applications from interested pilots.

By requiring pilots to have college degrees, they’re ensuring that the applicant at least has some ability to succeed in classroom learning, practice the same discipline used in acquiring the degree in the ground school and helps weed out to find the “cream of the crop”. I’m not saying that pilots with degrees are any better or worse than pilots without, but obtaining a college degree can be a whole lot easier than making it to the cockpit.

A college degree also should matter to you on a personal level. In 2001, the industry saw a lot of pilot furloughs where they were temporarily laid off and had to pursue other employment. Now if you have no skills or education apart from what you learned while attaining your certificates and ratings and you’re not able to find a flying job, you’ll be hard pressed to maintain your quality of life and continue to feed your family. If you want to keep all of your options open in the airline industry, get a degree. source

Top 15 Mistakes Made When Choosing a College
  1. Rushing the process. Finding the right college takes time and effort, not to mention research and an often lengthy application process. Waiting until the last minute or just “falling into a college” is never a good idea. It takes the most important factor out of the equation—you.
  2. Being a follower. Following a boyfriend, girlfriend, best friend to the college of their choice may seem like a good idea at the time because you want to be near them, but this is one of the most pivotal points in your life, too. You need to remember to make the best decisions for yourself and, if your relationships are strong, they will outlast time and distance anyway.
  3. The legacy lure. We’re aware the commandment states “Honor thy father and mother.” However, only considering colleges your parents, siblings or other family members went to in order to follow in their footsteps may not be in your best interest. It’s always better to explore your options and find the right fit for your personality.
  4. Rebellion. In contrast, only considering colleges your parents DON’T want you to go isn’t beneficial either. Sometimes, they have some good insight that may help you decide on what may be best for you. Don’t choose—or not choose—a college out of spite. This is sure to lead you down a path of regret. Choose a college based on what you want, not based on what someone else doesn’t.
  5. You’re a die-hard fan. We’ve all got our favorite teams, but let’s remember that just because they have a great sports team does not mean it’s the right educational fit for you. After all, you’re there to learn, not cheer them on. You can be a fan anywhere, but you can’t learn everywhere.
  6. The temptation to party. So, it’s a great party school but is it a great learning environment? While you may be itching to get out on your own and party like a rock star, that’s really not what college is about. Remember, when choosing a college that you want to choose somewhere what you can have a healthy social atmosphere but a setting that’s conducive to the real goal at hand—learning.
  7. How a student body looks. You’ve heard the student body is attractive. So what? Maybe you like this, maybe you’re worried you won’t fit in, either way, you should ignore these stereotypes because they probably are just that. Also, the attractiveness of a student body shouldn’t really make a different in your decision on where to get an education.
  8. Assuming the worst. Not applying to certain schools because you assume you won’t be accepted underrates your potential and potentially limits your future. Come on, you guys, we have reach schools for a reason. You never know what you can achieve if you don’t try, so at least make an attempt.
  9. Location, location, location. Whether you’re a homebody who wants to stay close or an escape artist who wants to get as far from home as possible, the location should be a factor in choosing a college, not the sole decision maker.
  10. Cost obsessions or carelessness. Forgetting to consider the cost or only considering the cost as a factor are two major issues to avoid. While cost is a huge hurdle, there are many other factors to consider as well and students should not be blinded by this one aspect. Reversely, students who are applying for financial aid or whose parents are paying for college should not neglect to think about cost completely, as costs can add up quite quickly.
  11. Not visiting. Experiences are relative and one person’s dream college could be another’s nightmare. This is why going by what you’ve been told is never a good idea. A person very different from you could have had a positive or negative experience that you likely would not have had. Also, only looking at the website or relying on a college’s advertising is a mistake because they tend to idealize college life and students get unrealistic expectations of what campus is like. It’s always better to visit and experience the college—or one very similar to it—for yourself.
  12. Relying on reputation. Just because it’s a “highly-ranked”, “prestigious” or a “designer” school doesn’t mean it’s the right school for you. Don’t always assume that the difficulty of getting into the school equates to the quality of education you’ll receive. Some students need smaller classes and more one-on-one interaction to thrive in a learning environment.
  13. Pushy parents. Letting your parents decide which college is right for you, or being forced by your parents to attend a certain school is not healthy. You need to think about what you want out of a college. After all, you’re the one attending the school.
  14. Having a one-track mind. Maybe you’ve wanted to go there since you were little and you’ve already decided there is only one right school for you. But not investigating all your options is a huge mistake. You can still attend you’re number one, we’re just asking you to check out the others, too. Just because you think it’s what you want doesn’t mean you can’t ask questions and, believe us, you can never ask too many!
  15. The college specializes in your current major. That’s right, we said current. Choosing a college solely because of a specific major or career path is a major (pun intended) issue because, odds are, your major will change several times. There’s nothing wrong with that, we just want you to be prepared with a school ready to accommodate all your dreams, whatever they may be. Source
Aviator College Degree Program
Approved by the FAA for a Restricted ATP Certificate at 1250 hours

2 year Associates Degree Program

The Aeronautical Science Program prepares the graduate for a career in the aviation industry by providing a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, aeronautical sciences, aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry. The graduate will receive an Associate of Science Degree from Aviator College with flight ratings from private pilot through commercial, with Flight Instructor ratings. This training is necessary to obtain employment, and by completing the associate’s degree you will set yourself apart from other applicants since a degree is preferred in the airline industry.

The flight portion of the program consists of a minimum of 565 flight hours and more multi-engine time than any other college or flight school today. Our large multi-engine fleet is equipped with Garmin 430s, and ASPEN EFIS is being introduced. Single engine fleet consists of Piper Warrior III with all glass (EFIS systems). Ground school is taught in a classroom environment.

The school’s14 acre campus encompasses 37,000 sq. ft. Administration & Academic training facility is open from 7 am to 6 pm daily. The Flight Operations building is open 24/7 daily, rain or shine.

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Online enrollment

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Associate Degree from Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology

Associate Degree from Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & TechnologyAbout two-thirds of airline pilots will retire in the coming years and other areas of the aviation industry are also under-supplied with qualified applicants. Many airlines, especially in the United States, prefer applicants with a college degree. So why not let your flight training build up college credit and earn a degree?

From an employer’s point of view, a degree from a certified aviation science program shows a high level of commitment to the field. Most commercial airlines prefer applicants with college degrees. If you are already a licensed pilot, flight time and certificates can be counted towards your degree, saving both time and money. Entering the aviation job market with a degree in aviation will get you the advantage you need to get a job as a pilot.

An aviation degree is a good, and cost efficient, alternative to doing any other college degree first and then start flying like many students do today. You save time by doing the flight training while you work on a degree. At the same time you save money as the flight training build credit.

Why an Aviation School or Aviation College?

Aviation schools and aviation colleges provide the best learning and training environments for students to succeed and prepare for a career in aviation. You may already be aware of the many benefits of going to college such as better paying jobs, access to a wider range of career choices, and exposure to a wide range of people and cultures. Going to an aviation school or aviation college also has many benefits.

An aviation school or aviation college will allow you to:
  • Gain greater knowledge and expand your skills in a specific aviation career field.
  • Earn an aviation degree, an associate’s degree, and/or bachelor’s degree in an aviation program.
  • Access a wide range of aviation resources and tools to help you with your aviation career.
  • Participate in various aviation internship programs.
  • Increase your chances of networking with aviation employers to gain employment.
Associate Degree And Aviation Programs

An associate degree is a two-year degree awarded by community colleges, technical schools and universities in the US. Earning an associate degree usually means completing 60 college credits, the equivalent of two years of coursework. In order to earn one, students must typically complete general education courses, core classes required for the college major, and electives. This degree is sufficient for work in some fields, while other positions may require completion of additional education.

Receiving an Associate Degree

Receiving an associate degree usually requires about two years of education, though this can vary depending on the individual program a student completes. Schools often require introductory and core curriculum courses, such as language studies and mathematics. Students also take additional classes that focus on the degree subject, such as computer science or healthcare.
While this study is not usually as specialized or focused as degrees that require many more years of classes, it can give a valuable overview needed for additional schooling or employment in certain fields.

Why Associate Degree

Length of Time. Students who do not wish to pursue a four-year bachelor’s degree often prefer the shorter length of an associate program.

Financial Reasons. Students can also save money by attending a junior or community college for the first two years of their post-secondary career; an associate degree usually transfers quite easily to a more expensive four-year college.

Adding On. You can continue your studies and pursue Bachelor’s Degree having Associate Degree in hand.
After earning an associate degree from an accredited school, a graduate can often apply these credits toward a bachelor’s degree program. Many universities accept an associate’s degree as a replacement for the first two years of coursework toward a higher degree. Someone with this degree can also enter the workplace in many careers, especially technical fields like computer science and programming. Other fields like nursing have opportunities for people with only one or two years of education, which may result in a specialized certification, rather than a degree.

Aviator College Of Aeronautical Science & Technology

All instrument time is logged in aircraft – No simulators are used for flight time. This “hands-on” approach provides the best training environment for pilots of the future. We also encourage training in actual instrument conditions. Flying at the college is 24 hours a day, seven days a week, rain or shine. Learning to fly in these conditions will give you the ability to fly anywhere in the world with the knowledge and experience required.  College President

Aviator College specializes specifically only on the development and training of future commercial pilots world-wide.
Aviator College is approved through the Accrediting Commission for Career Schools & Colleges, the State of Florida’s Commission for Independent Education and the Federal Department of Education to award two-year Associate’s Degrees in Aeronautical Science with a concentration in Flight Instruction.

To earn the Associate’s Degree in Aeronautical Science the student must earn a minimum of 71 credit hours

The mission of Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology is to provide practical and educational opportunities that emphasize the skills, knowledge, and experience necessary for a fulfilling career in aviation throughout a lifetime of technological and social change. We recognize that education is vital in developing skills needed for a productive society and essential in promoting the individual’s sense of worth, values, and high ethical standards. Our institution is committed to offering quality education that meets the needs of its students and assisting them in clarifying and pursuing their professional and educational goals in aviation. In fulfilling the mission of the Aviator, our institution sets forth the following objectives, which reflect the overall goals of the College. To provide a generous selection of academic curricula and specialized programs in aviation science enriched with instruction in general education To provide the students with a background of experience and job skills that will enhance their employability.

To lead the students in the self-discovery process of clarifying and raising the individual’s goals and achievements commensurate with their potential
To provide the students with the knowledge, skills and proficiency which contribute to success in their careers
To make available to our students activities and experiences through various internships that will foster personal growth and leadership qualities and will assist students in their vocational, academic and social pursuit
To provide a framework and atmosphere of learning that will enhance the student’s capability to demonstrate ethical and moral values in professional and personal situations
To strive for and maintain excellence in aviation and general education by continuously and systematically reviewing classroom facilities, equipment, curricula, faculty, and staff
To provide placement assistance for graduates and students through individual counseling
To maintain a process of communication with the community of employers to assure relevant curricula to meet the developing needs of the aviation industry.

  • Financing available on all programs for those who qualify.
  • VETERANS – Chapter 33 & Chapter 30 Benefits for Flight Training
  • Approved to enroll students for Flight School with Post 9/11 Benefits!
  • F-1 & M-1 VISA Approved for International Students
  • Issued to International Flight Training Students!
  • Classroom Environment
  • All classes taught in our educational center, NOT online
  • MORE Multi-Engine Time
  • A Minimum of 200 Hours Multi-Engine Flight Time!
  • DEDICATED to Your Success as a Airline Pilot
  • Graduate with a Degree, your Pilots Licenses and get Hired!
  • PROFESSIONAL Flight School Instructors
  • All Faculty are Pilots and College Graduates!
  • FOCUSED On Airline Pilot Flight Training Programs
  • For over 25 years, Flying and Flight Training has been our Passion!

Schedule a visit
Online Enrollment
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Institutions Authorized to Certify its Graduates for an Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) Certificate with Reduced Aeronautical Experience

Institutions Authorized to Certify its Graduates for an Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) Certificate with Reduced Aeronautical ExperienceThe Airline Transport Pilot License (ATPL), or in the United States of America, an Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) certificate is the highest level of aircraft pilot license. Those certified as Airline Transport Pilots (unconditional) are authorized to act as pilot in command on scheduled air carrier’s aircraft under CFR 14 Part 121.

Basic Requirements for ATP

Here are just a few of the basics requirements for the ATP License.

  • You must be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English Language
  • You must be able to obtain a 1st class medical certificate
  • You must be 23 years of age
  • You must hold at least a commercial pilot license with instrument rating
  • You must have 1500 hours total flying time
  • You must have 500 cross country flight time
  • You must have 75 hour of actual or simulated instrument flight time
  • You must pass the FAA ATP written exam
  • You must pass the ATP Oral and Practical Exam
Flight Training for ATP

The flight training for you ATP will be nothing new in terms of maneuvers or procedures. The check ride will consist of maneuvers and procedures you have already seen on you instrument, commercial and multi-engine check rides. The only difference is the standards you are expected to fly to. The tolerances are much tighter because at this point you are a professional pilot with a considerable amount of flight time and you are expect to be able to fly like it.
Training primarily focuses on polishing up your instrument flying skills it the multi-engine aircraft you will use for the check ride. If you do the training on your own it can be as little as 5-7 hours of prep. If you work for a large 135 outfit or 121 air-carrier its usually part of a FAA approved upgrade or transition training program.

The FAA Written

The written test for the ATP like all other licenses and ratings is an 80 question computerized test. The questions consist primarily of part 135 and 121 regulations, hazardous materials, high altitude and high-speed aerodynamics, and transport category operating and Performance Data.

The FAA Oral Exam

Again like the written the test the oral examination is taken to a highest level in your aviation career. With the examiner focusing on the regulations appropriate to your type operation, ie 121 or 135. Also included is an in-depth discussion of the test aircrafts various systems. This especially holds true if a company check airman is administering your check ride.

The FAA Practical Exam

Hopefully by the time you pass the written and oral for the ATP the flight should be a breeze. The flight depending on your operation will be conducted in a multi-engine aircraft or flight simulator. The flight test is comprised mostly instrument procedures both multi and single engine. Other abnormal procedures may also be thrown in the mix with the simulator allowing fore more flexibility than a check ride in the aircraft. Like every other check ride aside from your instrument you will also have to demonstrate maneuvers such as stalls and steep turns.

Costs

The costs for the ATP license are quite variable. If you choose to get the ATP on your own you have to budget for about 5-10 hours of flight time in some sort of multi engine aircraft. Some FBO’s and flight school offer a package deal for obtaining your ATP, it usually includes a written test prep and the required flight time to get you up to speed in their aircraft. If you’re lucky to work for a 135 or 121 outfit then the cost to you is nothing financially, the only investment is the time and energy in preparing for your check ride. For those of you looking to do it on your own check out our members only area for links to cheap flight time. Our flight time finder will be coming soon. Source

New ATP Rule

Congress has mandated changes to the requirement to fly as a co-pilot (first officer/second-in-command) in Part 121 airline operations. Currently, a commercially certificated pilot with 250 total hours could serve as a co-pilot. However, in response to the congressional mandate, the FAA has created new certification and qualification requirements for pilots in air carrier operations that took effect in August 2013. As a result of this action, a second in command (first officer) in domestic, flag, and supplemental operations must now hold an airline transport pilot certificate (ATP) and an airplane type rating for the aircraft to be flown.

An ATP certificate requires that a pilot be 23 years of age and have 1,500 hours total time as a pilot. Pilots with fewer than 1,500 flight hours may qualify for a restricted privileges airline transport pilot certificate (R-ATP) beginning at 21 years of age, if they are 1) a military-trained pilot, 2) have a bachelor’s degree with an aviation major, or 3) have an associate’s degree with an aviation major. The alternative total flight hour requirements for an R (restricted) -ATP certificate with airplane category multiengine class rating are:

  • 750 hours for a military pilot who has graduated from a flight training program in the Armed Forces;
  • 1,000 hours for a graduate who holds a bachelor’s degree with an aviation major (60+ aviation semester credits) from an institution of higher education who also receives a commercial certificate and instrument rating from an associated part 141 pilot school;
  • 1,250 hours for a graduate who holds a bachelor’s or an associate’s degree with an aviation major (30+ aviation semester credits) from an institution of higher education who also receives a commercial certificate and instrument rating from an associated part 141 pilot school;

Additionally, to receive an airline transport pilot certificate with a multiengine class rating a pilot must have 50 hours of multiengine flight experience and must have completed a new FAA-approved Airline Transport Pilot Certification Training Program. This new training program will include academic coursework and training in a flight simulation training device. These requirements will ensure that a pilot has the proper qualifications, training, and experience before entering an air carrier environment as a pilot flightcrew member. Source

Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) Certificate with Reduced Aeronautical Experience

Graduates of an institution of higher education that have received Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) authorization to certify graduates may be eligible to apply for a restricted privileges airline transport pilot (ATP) certificate. The total flight time requirements for a restricted privileges ATP Certificate based on a degree with an aviation major are found in § 61.160

  • 1,000 hours for a graduate who holds a bachelor’s degree with an aviation major and meets the remaining requirements of § 61.160(b)
  • 1,250 hours for a graduate who holds an associate’s degree with an aviation major and meets the remaining requirements of § 61.160(c)
  • 1,250 hours for a graduate who holds a bachelor’s degree with an aviation major and meets the remaining requirements of § 61.160(d)

NOTE: To show up in FAA list, an institution of higher education is issued its Letter of Authorization (LOA).
To view the list visit FAA

Aviator College is listed among Institutions Authorized to Certify its Graduates for an Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) Certificate with Reduced Aeronautical Experience
Aviator College Degree Program

Approved by the FAA for a Restricted ATP Certificate at 1250 hours

2 year Associates Degree Program
The Aeronautical Science Program prepares the graduate for a career in the aviation industry by providing a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, aeronautical sciences, aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry. The graduate will receive an Associate of Science Degree from Aviator College with flight ratings from private pilot through commercial, with Flight Instructor ratings. This training is necessary to obtain employment, and by completing the associate’s degree you will set yourself apart from other applicants since a degree is preferred in the airline industry.

The flight portion of the program consists of a minimum of 565 flight hours and more multi-engine time than any other college or flight school today. Our large multi-engine fleet is equipped with Garmin 430s, and ASPEN EFIS is being introduced. Single engine fleet consists of Piper Warrior III with all glass (EFIS systems). Ground school is taught in a classroom environment.

The school’s14 acre campus encompasses 37,000 sq. ft. Administration & Academic training facility is open from 7 am to 6 pm daily. The Flight Operations building is open 24/7 daily, rain or shine.

Online Application

Schedule a visit

Study Aviation in US Based College

Study Aviation in US Based CollegeDeciding to study in the international country is a serious undertaking. Living, studying and working in a foreign country permits students to become more independent and cultured, while also fostering their cross-cultural and interpersonal communication skills. To decide if it is the best option for you, consider carefully how it will fit into your long-term educational and professional plans.

There are hundreds of colleges, universities and flight schools in the US that offer international students degrees, certificates, ratings or diplomas in aviation. In addition to location, cost and size, the most important criteria to consider is whether or not it has the aviation degree program of your choice. There are many different types of aviation degree programs to choose from and your decision will be based on the type of career you want to achieve.
Foreign students may study full time at learning institutions approved by USCIS, including American language schools, high schools, universities and other institutions of higher education.

If your main purpose of travel to the U.S. is tourism but you also want to take studies of less than 18 hours per week, you may be able to do so on a visitor visa. If, however, your studies will be more than 18 hours per week, you must secure an F-1 or M-1 student visa. F-1 student visas are granted to academic and language students for the full duration of their studies. M-1 student visas are issued to vocational students for up to 1 year of studies.
To learn about financial aid, student visas, and required tests, explore the resources described below.

Financial Aid Eligibility

Most foreign citizens are not eligible for federal student aid from the U.S. Department of Education. There are, however, some instances in which noncitizens may be eligible for financial aid from the U.S. federal government. Visit StudentAid.gov/eligibility/non-us-citizens to learn more.  You also should check with your country’s government and with the college you plan to attend to see what aid they might be able to offer you.

Admissions Tests

Most U.S. schools require the TOEFL exam for nonnative English speakers, while many undergraduate institutions also require you to take the SAT or the ACT test. Visit StudentAid.gov/prepare-for-college/tests for information about the SAT and ACT, and visit http://www.toefl.org for information about the TOEFL.

Student Visas

If you are coming to the U.S. primarily for tourism, but want to take a short course of study of fewer than 18 hours per week, you may do so on a tourist visa. Otherwise, you will need to obtain a student visa. In most countries, first time student visa applicants are required to appear for an in-person interview.
Each embassy and consulate sets its own interview policies and procedures regarding student visas. Consult the U.S. embassy website for your country for specific application instructions. source

Is an Aviation Degree Right for You

One of the more popular fields of study nowadays is aviation. Many international students have been flocking to the degree path in hopes of a career in the air. While the prospects are exciting, international students should ask themselves if a degree in aviation right for them.

Many students decide to study aviation in the US. While some hope to start careers as pilots, others want to work in a vibrant industry. There are several different degrees available in aviation, and international students should make sure they know which degree is best for them. Are you looking to fly? Do you want to be in aviation maintenance or aviation management? Are you interested in air traffic control? These are all questions that students should explore. While they all are amazing opportunities, all veterans in the aviation field will tell prospective students one thing: you need to have a passion in order to be successful.

Degree Programs

There are a number of different and exciting degree programs available when studying aviation in the US. Students should try to find a university that has a strong aviation program that has a proven history of putting students directly into aviation careers. One of the more popular degree paths in aviation is aviation management. These programs prepare students for leadership roles in the administrative departments of major airlines and aviation companies. They prepare students for staff and executive roles. Students also have the opportunity to concentrate in a specific subject with the management program. These subjects include:

  • Airport Management
  • Airline Management
  • International Air Transport Management
  • Flight Operations
  • General Management

Another popular degree is Aviation Maintenance. Aircraft mechanics are very specialized in their discipline, and their expertise is hard to find. Student with Aviation Maintenance degrees have great prospects. Students who earn this degree also are usually awarded the Aircraft and Powerplant Maintenance Certificate, a necessary designation that shows expertise in aviation mechanics. The degree program teaches students the necessary information and complex issues of aircraft maintenance. Students have the opportunity to concentrate in Flight, Electronics and other specialized fields.

One of the most popular aviation degrees is in the field of Air Traffic Control or Air Traffic Management. Air traffic controllers are very highly paid employees, and the need for them is increasing over time. Students will be instructed in the nuances and regulations involved with air traffic control and also work on management and leadership skills within the field.

Curriculum

The curriculum of an aviation concentrated degree can be tough for some international students. The degree path is very technical in nature. Like other degree paths, aviation based degree programs require sixty credits of general education requirements. These courses cover courses in communications, humanities, some social sciences, mathematics, and physical sciences. The actual course credits will start with some introductory aeronautics courses. Student will need to take courses in aeronautic science and others in computer based classes. In addition, the aviation program requires deep knowledge of mathematics and physics. Students will re required to take classes in Statistics and Calculus.

Depending on the actual degree, courses may differ. Aviation administration degrees will have a lot of courses in business like Management, Accounting, Corporate Finance and International Business. Aviation Maintenance students will instead have a lot of classes in technical areas. Students should expect to take classes in aviation mathematics and physics, fundamentals of electricity, and aircraft regulations. In their concentrations, students will face many others courses like Private Flights, Commercial Flights, Aviation Technical Operations, and Aerodynamics. Air Traffic Control majors will have many courses in mathematics because it is one of the most important aspects of the degree. Students will begin to dive into the core courses in air traffic control, that teach the fundamentals of air traffic control. Some courses include Aviation Traffic I and II, Aviation Safety and Aviation Weather. source

Aviator College Degree Program
Approved by the FAA for a Restricted ATP Certificate at 1250 hours

2 year Associates Degree Program
The Aeronautical Science Program prepares the graduate for a career in the aviation industry by providing a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, aeronautical sciences, aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry. The graduate will receive an Associate of Science Degree from Aviator College with flight ratings from private pilot through commercial, with Flight Instructor ratings. This training is necessary to obtain employment, and by completing the associate’s degree you will set yourself apart from other applicants since a degree is preferred in the airline industry.

The flight portion of the program consists of a minimum of 565 flight hours and more multi-engine time than any other college or flight school today. Our large multi-engine fleet is equipped with Garmin 430s, and ASPEN EFIS is being introduced. Single engine fleet consists of Piper Warrior III with all glass (EFIS systems). Ground school is taught in a classroom environment.

International Department
Aviator College Enrollment Instructions
Contact Aviator

Which Flight Training Program is Right For You

Which Flight Training Program is Right For YouThere are over 300 two- and four-year colleges with aviation programs and aviation schools in the United States and world-wide that offer various aviation programs (including non-engineering programs) to students interested in pursuing a career in aviation.

Florida is a great place to earn your wings. The weather stays warm through out the year, almost all 365 days! The moderate and mild climate makes flight training a pleasure. The good weather allows you to log more flying hours faster, get your degree quicker and be on the way sooner to your new aviation career.

Being a pilot is a well-respected job in the community, and the pay is good in general. The education path you choose depends upon the type of pilot you want to become: a commercial pilot or just want to fly as a hobby with private pilot license in hand. Whereas many pilots formerly came from the military where they gained their flying experience, more and more these days have a college education, an aviation degree even, with flight training from schools that are Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certified. As a result, more employers are reportedly beginning to require college degrees as well.

Some airlines hire high school graduates, but most prefer airline pilots with at least a 2 year degree. As the number of college-educated applicants increases, this is becoming an educational requirement. It takes much more than completing an educational aviation program to become an aircraft pilot, however. Depending on their responsibilities, pilots these days must have hundreds to thousands of hours of flight experience behind them. They might also have to fulfill other requirements.

Types Of Flight Training Programs

There are four items to consider when choosing the best flight training program: hands-on training, equipment, admissions requirements, and faculty. A flight training program can be part of a larger college, but can also be an independent school. The best flight training programs are affiliated with the local airfields or airplane pilot training programs. In the United States, the military is a popular option for flight training.

Selecting the best school should be based on your own goals, achievements, and skill levels. Select a school where you will be both challenged and successful. The best school is often a matter of specialized programs, designed to provide additional skills or support. For example, the best school for someone who does not like crowds would have small class sizes and be on a small campus. Students who prefer a lot of social interaction as part of their learning process might benefit from being in a larger school, with a broader range of programs and students.

The best flight training programs have a wide range of equipment available for student use. This includes full- and half-size airplane models, flight simulation programs, opportunities to practice in specially designed planes, and other simulation programs. Check the average class size to ensure you will have ample opportunity to use this equipment. This is critical, as practical skill as a pilot is required to obtain a flying license. Source

Why Flight Experience is a Must

In addition to solid education, flight experience is also a must for a pilot license. The Armed Forces provide many experienced airline pilots due to extensive flying time. Also appropriate are flight schools or lessons from FAA-certified flight instructors. Training includes a week of company indoctrination, 3 to 6 weeks of simulator training on the ground and 25 hours of initial operating experience. Once or twice a year throughout their career they must attend training or checks.

For a license, applicants must by 18 or older and have 250 hours of experience in the air. They also need to pass an exam and have 20/20 vision with or without corrective lenses, good hearing, no physical handicaps that could impair performance, and be in good health. They also need to be rated by the FAA to fly by instruments in periods of low visibility. And airline pilots working as captains must have an air transport pilot’s license.

Airline pilots may advance into other flying jobs such as flying corporate planes. A small number find jobs at the airlines as flight engineers. Seniority helps determine the most desirable routes. With 1 to 5 years of experience they become first officers and with 5 to 15 years they become captains.

Aviator College Degree Program
Approved by the FAA for a Restricted ATP Certificate at 1250 hours
2 year Associates Degree Program

The Aeronautical Science Program prepares the graduate for a career in the aviation industry by providing a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, aeronautical sciences, aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry. The graduate will receive an Associate of Science Degree from Aviator College with flight ratings from private pilot through commercial, with Flight Instructor ratings. This training is necessary to obtain employment, and by completing the associate’s degree you will set yourself apart from other applicants since a degree is preferred in the airline industry.

The flight portion of the program consists of a minimum of 565 flight hours and more multi-engine time than any other college or flight school today. Our large multi-engine fleet is equipped with Garmin 430s, and ASPEN EFIS is being introduced. Single engine fleet consists of Piper Warrior III with all glass (EFIS systems). Ground school is taught in a classroom environment.

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Researching Aviation Colleges in US

Researching Aviation Colleges in USThe time has come for young people with a dream to fly or fix airplanes. The shortage of pilot and aviation mechanics offers students entering the aviation field a great opportunity and a brighter future. Career opportunities in the aviation industry require varied amounts of education. For example, flight attendants or aircraft maintenance technicians may only need a certificate or associate’s degree, while pilots and air traffic controllers may need a bachelor’s degree. Those interested in working as airport managers or aviation researchers may need a master’s degree. Additionally, aspiring aviation students may need to attend a school with specialized aviation training facilities.

Colleges are all about research, learning and education. To apply for college and begin preparing for a career requires a general understanding of fields available in aviation. Learn about educational programs in the aviation field, including undergraduate and graduate certificate and degree programs. Find out about the courses offered in these programs.
Aviation Science Colleges and Universities in the U.S.

Aviation science is the study of human-crafted, air-borne devices and the regulatory laws that govern the devices and people who are associated with construction and operation of the devices. Many colleges and universities in the U.S. offer various degree programs in aviation science.

How to Select an Aviation Science School

Aviation science schools may allow and promote hands-on experiences to help its students develop practical knowledge about the aviation industry. Schools that possess aviation technology labs and aircraft simulators can provide direct instruction to an aviation science student. Some aviation science universities may offer more technologically advanced facilities than others, and this may be a consideration for the prospective student.
The level of professional experience of an aviation science college’s faculty can influence a prospective aviation student. In aviation science programs, it is important for students to learn about aviation operations, aircraft structure and aircraft performance and design from someone who has formal up-to-date knowledge and experience in the aviation field.

Aviation science programs are offered to suit different career options in the aviation industry and are available at the certificate as well as the associate’s and bachelor’s degree levels, so students may want to select a school accordingly. Many aviation science universities have degree concentrations in aviation maintenance, aviation management, aviation meteorology and air traffic control. For students interested in becoming pilots, some aviation universities offer pilot technology programs that can lead to a Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) certificate; the certificate can lead to possible employment with regional and corporate aviation companies.

Certificate in Aviation Technology

Some technical schools and community colleges offer certificate programs in aviation technology that cover basic concepts in air traffic control, aircraft repair and piloting. These programs prepare graduates for more advanced study in the field or entry-level careers. Some certificate programs instruct on several aspects of the discipline, while other emphasize a specific facet, like aircraft electronics or aircraft frame maintenance.

Program Coursework
The classes offered in aviation technology certificate programs teach the scientific and mathematical fundamentals behind air travel. Students learn the basic theoretical and practical skills of the aviation industry. Courses on the following subjects are often required:

  • Aircraft frame maintenance
  • Aircraft blueprints
  • Aircraft electronics
  • Propeller maintenance
  • Aviation mathematics
  • Popular Career Options

Earning a certificate in aviation technology prepares graduates for entry-level careers in aircraft exterior maintenance, airline customer service and aircraft electronics repair. Some careers to choose:

  • Flight attendant
  • Aircraft maintenance technician
  • Airport customer service representative

To provide a salary perspective for one such option, aircraft mechanics and service technicians brought in median annual pay of $55,210 in 2012 and can expect a 6% increase in jobs from 2010-2020, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), http://www.bls.gov.

Associate of Applied Science in Aviation Management

Associate of Applied Science (AAS) programs in aviation management often focus on a specific area of the field, such as air traffic control, flight training or flight management. Programs cover the business and management aspects of aviation in addition to the technical and mechanical facets. Students gain practical experience through simulations and hands-on work with industry equipment.

Program Coursework

AAS aviation programs teach students to work with several current aircraft makes and models. Classes at this level cover the business, technical and personnel areas of air travel. Topics include:

  • Air travel safety
  • History of aviation
  • Commercial piloting
  • Airport management
  • Air traffic control
Popular Career Options

Those with an associate’s degree in aviation qualify for a number of careers in the air travel and air cargo industries. Graduates can work for airports, commercial airlines or air freighters. The careers noted below are popular options:
Air traffic control assistant
Air cargo transporter
Airport management assistant

Bachelor of Science in Aviation Management

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) programs for aviation management usually offer a more specialized curriculum than certificate or associate’s degree programs. Students take advanced coursework in areas such as aircraft repair, piloting or aviation management. Programs offer a combination of classroom instruction and simulated or hands-on practice.

Educational Prerequisites

Since most fields in aviation technology require employees to have strong mathematics and science skills, bachelor’s degree programs seek applicants who have completed advanced coursework in subjects like calculus, geometry, physics and chemistry. Applicants also need to meet unique program standards for grade point average and college entrance examination scores. Holding a high school diploma or its equivalent is mandatory.

Program Coursework

Aviation school programs offer courses in flight theory, aircraft systems, crew resource management (CRM), meteorology, air traffic control and global navigation. Classroom training is substantially supplemented by flight labs, in which students undergo hands-on training via sophisticated flight simulators. Classes on the following topics are usually offered:

  • Flight simulation
  • Aviation operation control
  • Law and regulation in aviation
  • Commercial pilot fundamentals
  • Air traffic control methods

Popular Career Options

B.S. in Aviation Management programs prepare graduates for administrative and technical careers in the air travel and air cargo industries. Some advanced aviation positions may require several years of work experience. Many graduates become:

  • Commercial pilots
  • Air traffic controllers
  • Airline business managers

Narrowing Your Research To A Specific Aviation College

Choose 2 or 3 regionally accredited colleges with aviation programs that include training for the career you want. If air traffic control or flying are among your serious interests, be sure to choose a program that meets Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) guidelines. The FAA may even have certified it as a ‘Collegiate Training Initiative’ program.
See if the school is associated with an airport or large aviation business, since such schools tend to provide more internship opportunities. It is important to schedule a visit prior to selecting your flight school or aviation college.
http://education-portal.com/colleges_with_aviation_programs.html

Aviation Research and Locator

http://www.flyingmag.com/pilots-places/aviation-colleges
http://flighttraining.aopa.org/learntofly/school/aviation_colleges/
https://www.faa.gov/education/student_resources/schools_universities/
http://www.flightschoollist.com/aviation-college.php

Aviator College Degree Program

Approved by the FAA for a Restricted ATP Certificate at 1250 hours

2 year Associates Degree Program

The Aeronautical Science Program prepares the graduate for a career in the aviation industry by providing a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, aeronautical sciences, aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry. The graduate will receive an Associate of Science Degree from Aviator College with flight ratings from private pilot through commercial, with Flight Instructor ratings. This training is necessary to obtain employment, and by completing the associate’s degree you will set yourself apart from other applicants since a degree is preferred in the airline industry.

The flight portion of the program consists of a minimum of 565 flight hours and more multi-engine time than any other college or flight school today. Our large multi-engine fleet is equipped with Garmin 430s, and ASPEN EFIS is being introduced. Single engine fleet consists of Piper Warrior III with all glass (EFIS systems). Ground school is taught in a classroom environment.

The school’s14 acre campus encompasses 37,000 sq. ft. Administration & Academic training facility is open from 7 am to 6 pm daily. The Flight Operations building is open 24/7 daily, rain or shine.

Online Enrollment
Download a Catalog
Schedule a Visit

Why Invest In Aviation Degree

Why Invest In Aviation DegreeAbout two-thirds of airline pilots will retire in the coming years and other areas of the aviation industry are also under-supplied with qualified applicants. What is required to be a qualified applicant?

Few of the major airlines require a college degree for employment, but in the past several years, more than 95 percent of the pilots hired have at least a four-year college degree. If you want an airline job, you stand a better chance if you are among the 95 percent with a degree than the 5 percent without it. Many airlines, especially in the United States, prefer applicants with a college degree. From an employer’s point of view, a degree from a certified aviation science program shows a high level of commitment to the field. Most commercial airlines prefer applicants with college degrees. If you are already a licensed pilot, flight time and certificates can be counted towards your degree, saving both time and money. Entering the aviation job market with a degree in aviation will get you the advantage you need to get a job as a pilot.

Types Of Aviation Degrees

There are several types of aviation degree programs, most of which involve learning how to pilot a plane as well as obtaining knowledge beyond what is required for a basic pilot’s license. While most pilot positions do not actually require a college degree, airlines prefer to see that applicants have the focus to complete college-level work. A degree in aviation can be obtained at the graduate level, which is a good qualification for researchers and teachers in aviation. An aviation maintenance degree is quite different from a degree that includes flight time, but this can be a good program for people interested in the technical aspects of flight.

A degree in Aviation Technology prepares you for a variety of aviation careers, including those in maintenance, engineering, air traffic control and piloting. Degrees are offered at various levels through colleges, universities, vocational schools and online institutions.

Aviation Technology Degrees

On its website, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), http://www.faa.gov, lists over 100 accredited colleges and universities with Aviation programs. These institutions offer a variety of degree options, from a Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical Management Technology to an Associate of Applied Science in Aviation Technology. While the programs may vary in focus and depth of training, most will include basic Aviation Technology concepts, including:

  • Aircraft operations
  • Effects of weather
  • FAA and other regulations
  • Navigation
  • Air traffic control
  • Basic aircraft systems
  • Associate Degrees in Aviation Technology

An associate degree program generally lasts about two years and prepares students for entry-level employment in the Aviation industry or for continued study in Aviation. Concentrations may include Aviation maintenance, air traffic control or airport management.

Bachelor Degrees in Aviation Technology

A bachelor degree program will include a broad range of educational requirements in addition to Aviation instruction. Most bachelor degree programs last for four years. Programs are available for professional piloting, airport management, airline management and aviation engineering.

If you look for more then just a certificate then doing your flight training with a college is something to consider. Many colleges throughout the world offer degrees such as bachelor of aviation science or associates of aviation science. Stand alone these degrees do not qualify for any profession without your commercial pilot license (CPL) but make a good starting point if you want to do a masters degree in aviation. Also they look very good on your resume and may be a door opener when applying for a job.

Also already trained pilots can do an aviation degree program with a college. Depending on the college they may credit your flight time and certificates towards a degree. Usually you don’t get full credit (as if you had done the flying with the college), but it may still be a money saver as flying with some colleges are more expensive then the average flight school. However some colleges require you to do at least two or more certificates and/or ratings with them to qualify for a degree.

For already trained pilots some of the classes you have to do are pure repetition as they are meant for pilot students enrolled in the degree program. You still have to take them to get the needed credits to graduate.

NOTE: An aviation degree is a good, and cost efficient, alternative to doing any other college degree first and then start flying like many students do today. You save time by doing the flight training while you work on a degree. At the same time you save money as the flight training build credit.

Associate Degree And Aviation Programs

An associate degree is a two-year degree awarded by community colleges, technical schools and universities in the US. Earning an associate degree usually means completing 60 college credits, the equivalent of two years of coursework. In order to earn one, students must typically complete general education courses, core classes required for the college major, and electives. This degree is sufficient for work in some fields, while other positions may require completion of additional education.

Receiving an Associate Degree

Receiving an associate degree usually requires about two years of education, though this can vary depending on the individual program a student completes. Schools often require introductory and core curriculum courses, such as language studies and mathematics. Students also take additional classes that focus on the degree subject, such as computer science or healthcare.

While this study is not usually as specialized or focused as degrees that require many more years of classes, it can give a valuable overview needed for additional schooling or employment in certain fields.

Why Associate Degree?
  1. Length of Time. Students who do not wish to pursue a four-year bachelor’s degree often prefer the shorter length of an associate program.
  2. Financial Reasons. Students can also save money by attending a junior or community college for the first two years of their post-secondary career; an associate degree usually transfers quite easily to a more expensive four-year college.
  3. Adding On. You can continue your studies and pursue Bachelor’s Degree having Associate Degree in hand.

After earning an associate degree from an accredited school, a graduate can often apply these credits toward a bachelor’s degree program. Many universities accept an associate’s degree as a replacement for the first two years of coursework toward a higher degree. Someone with this degree can also enter the workplace in many careers, especially technical fields like computer science and programming. Other fields like nursing have opportunities for people with only one or two years of education, which may result in a specialized certification, rather than a degree.

Aviation College and Aviation Programs

There are over 300 two- and four-year colleges with aviation programs and aviation schools in the United States and world-wide that offer various aviation programs (including non-engineering programs) to students interested in pursuing a career in aviation. Many of the aviation programs will allow you to either earn an aviation diploma, certificate or rating, aviation degree, an Associates and/or Bachelors degree (which is dependent on the type of school and their aviation programs).

Why an Aviation School or Aviation College?

Aviation schools and aviation colleges provide the best learning and training environments for students to succeed and prepare for a career in aviation. You may already be aware of the many benefits of going to college such as better paying jobs, access to a wider range of career choices, and exposure to a wide range of people and cultures. Going to an aviation school or aviation college also has many benefits.

An aviation school or aviation college will allow you to:

  • Gain greater knowledge and expand your skills in a specific aviation career field.
  • Earn an aviation degree, an associate’s degree, and/or bachelor’s degree in an aviation program.
  • Access a wide range of aviation resources and tools to help you with your aviation career.
  • Participate in various aviation internship programs.
  • Increase your chances of networking with aviation employers to gain employment.
Aviator College Degree Program

Approved by the FAA for a Restricted ATP Certificate at 1250 hours

2 year Associates Degree Program

The Aeronautical Science Program prepares the graduate for a career in the aviation industry by providing a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, aeronautical sciences, aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry. The graduate will receive an Associate of Science Degree from Aviator College with flight ratings from private pilot through commercial, with Flight Instructor ratings. This training is necessary to obtain employment, and by completing the associate’s degree you will set yourself apart from other applicants since a degree is preferred in the airline industry.