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Happy New Year from Aviator Flight Training Academy

December 31, 2012 Leave a comment

Happy New Year from Aviator Flight Training Academy

  • FACT: The current recession has created fierce competition for jobs in all industries. Now is the perfect opportunity for you to start your flight training in an industry that has tremendous potential!
  • FACT: Airline jobs are not going away, the demand is beginning to increase. For many current airline pilots, the mandatory retirement age is approaching!
  • FACT: The FAA is now taking a more serious look at airline pilot flight training. This is forcing the airline industry to take a harder look at candidates for pilot replacements!
  • FACT: Professional Pilots must now have first-rate knowledge and continually upgraded skills if they want to hear the word “Hired!” Pilots who train at quality aviation schools and who possess the technical knowledge, first-rate flying skills and a professional attitude will have the hiring edge!
  • FACT: Professionalism and knowledge are now prerequisites for entrance into the worldwide airline industry. Fast paced, “fast track” programs, or self-study courses will not meet the new airline industry standards.

Aviator Flight Training Academy offers professional pilot training programs with a minimum of 200 hours of multi-engine time. The flight school has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator), large classrooms and individual briefing rooms.

ENROLL NOW FOR WINTER CLASSES

CONTACT AVIATOR COLLEGE

Phone (772) 672-8222
Toll Free 1-800-635-9032

For Pilot Students Who Are Starting Their Flight Training

Before beginning any sort of flight training you really need to do some homework on flight schools you would like to attend. As suggested and recommended by many, the best way to ‘interview’ any potential flight school is to visit the school in person. Talk with the instructors and students, and then most importantly ask to see the maintenance hangar. What you see in the hangar is most likely an accurate clue to how the company is run. Is the hangar clean/ picked up? Do the mechanics take pride in their jobs? If you are comfortable with what you have discovered, then move forward.

The flight schools that operate under FAA Regulations Part 141 should be given high consideration.
Flight schools come in two flavors, Part 61 and Part 141, which refer to the parts of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) under which they operate. The most common and least important distinction between them is the minimum flight time required for the private pilot certificate (sometimes called a pilot license)—40 hours under Part 61, and 35 hours under Part 141.

Considering that the national average for earning a private pilot certificate is 60-75 hours (how long you’ll take will depend on your ability and flying frequency), this difference isn’t important for initial pilot training. It does make a difference to commercial pilot applicants: Part 61 requires 250 hours, and Part 141 requires 190.
What differentiates the two is structure and accountability. Part 141 schools are periodically audited by the FAA and must have detailed, FAA-approved course outlines and meet student pilot performance rates. Part 61 schools don’t have the same paperwork and accountability requirements.

Learning under Part 61 rules can often give students the flexibility to rearrange flying lesson content and sequence to meet their needs, which can be of benefit to part-time students. Many Part 141 schools also train students under Part 61 rules.

For Pilot Students Who Are Graduating from Flight Training School or Flight College

How To Market Yourself as A Pilot
By Karen M. Kahn
Capt. Karen Kahn is the author of Flight Guide for Success: Tips and Tactics for the Aspiring Airline Pilot and a career counselor. A Master CFI and 30-year airline pilot, she flies the Boeing 757/767 for a major U.S. carrier.

Throughout your aviation career, one of your main jobs will be to market your talents and skills to prospective employers. You are unique and you bring special talents to your flying jobs. Your goal, as you progress in aviation, is to cultivate your special qualities and market them to your advantage.

Imagine sitting in front of a prospective employer whose first question is, “Tell us about yourself.” In sales-speak this translates to: “Why should I buy your product? What can you do better than your competition? Convince me that you’re right for this job.”

Long before your interview is scheduled, make a list of your best qualities as well as those that make you unique. Your skills, talents, and extra-curricular activities are pluses that you’ll want to describe briefly. How will you assist their organization? What have you done in the past that qualifies you for the job? What new ideas do you bring to the company? What special achievements or awards in your past should they know about? Remember, it’s up to you to share this information with them. Don’t make them dig for it.

Organize your delivery into a two- to three-minute, well-paced presentation that gives the interviewer a good chronology of how you got into aviation, where and when you accumulated your ratings, how you acquired the necessary flight experience, and, finally, how you happen to be sitting before them today. Be sure to make your progression a logical one that follows your résumé and mentions the various training events and employers you’ve listed. Spice your story with a bit of humor, leaning heavily toward highlighting your best accomplishments. Did you work your way through college, receive a scholarship or special funding for one of your ratings, or score a 99 on your ATP knowledge test?

Do you have interesting hobbies or unusual talents that don’t appear on your résumé? Organize the highlights of your life into a concise, interesting short story. This should be an upbeat, positive presentation that gives interviewers the feeling of the real you. It should make them want to hear more about your dedication and the sacrifices you have made for your aviation career. In a word, make your summary memorable-concise, complete, interesting, informative, and humorous.

Selling yourself requires some chutzpah, which you may not normally possess. Recognize the image you want to project and work to show that person to prospective employers. Each one will want to get to know you quickly in an interview situation, and you’ll have numerous opportunities to practice your delivery. Plan your delivery carefully, add to it as you acquire additional skills and experience, and remember that your success depends on being your own best salesperson.

Distributed by Viestly

Importance of Pilot Networking and Recommendations In Getting a Pilot Job

December 28, 2012 Leave a comment

Importance of Pilot Networking and Recommendations In Getting a Pilot JobOne of the biggest differentiators in getting a job, pilot job included, is having connections. How well are you connected? Employers will pay a special attention to pilot recommendations in their normal hiring process. Embrace this fact early and begin networking. Go to job fairs, visit the big airline pilot forums, jumpseat on your future airline of choice, and always have business cards handy. These actions could be the single greatest determinant to your success in landing the job you most desire.

Aviator Flight Training Academy Faculty & Instructors

Faculty and Flight Training Instructors are hired directly from the ranks of our graduating student population and have more than 200 hours of multi-engine flight time. The Faculty at Aviator College hold a minimum of a Bachelors Degree and teach all flight training, classroom based courses. The Academy Flight Instructors are hired directly from the ranks of Aviator graduates. The Flight Training Instructors work one-on-one with their students in the air. Students often complete the entire program with the same Flight Training Instructor, which allows them to find a comfortable relationship and learn faster. Flight Training Instructors are available to fly with students 24 hours-a-day, rain or shine. We encourage our Flight Training Instructors to provide actual instrument flight time with their students whenever possible to gain real-world experience. Our Flight Training Instructors continue to grow in their skills while flying in the high density traffic operations of Florida’s airspace.

To speak with an instructor contact the Aviator College at 772-672-8222.

Our instructors have more than 200 hours of multi-engine time before they begin instructing. Our instructors have been hired by the regional airlines starting at 500-1000 hours total time. To-date, none of our instructors hired by the regional airlines have failed to pass indoctrination and initial training.

ENROLL NOW FOR WINTER CLASSES

CONTACT AVIATOR COLLEGE

Phone (772) 672-8222
Toll Free 1-800-635-9032

For our flight students, we have outlined Florida Aviation Calendar, provided by funplacestofly.
For links, website and additional information, visit funplacestofly.

Friday – Sunday, Jan 4-6, 2013 – Pompano Beach, FL – Private Pilot Written Class
Pompano Beach Airpark (PMP)

American Flyers is conducting a weekend Private Pilot written preparation class from January 4-6, 2013. Course fee is 395.00 and includes textbook and test supplement. On-site testing is available by appointment. Exam can be scheduled on Sunday afternoon at additional cost. Contact: Andrew Henley 954-785-1450.

Saturday, Jan 5, 2013 – Pompano Beach, FL – Fly-in/Drive-in for an Open House, Free Lunch and Wings Seminar
Pompano Beach Airpark (PMP)

American Flyers invites you and a friend to join us for our open house. Spend a fun-filled afternoon at the airport and enjoy the camaraderie of others who share your passion for aviation. Enjoy a complimentary lunch and stay for the optional WINGs seminar. All attendees will be given a certificate for a free 2-hour VFR or IFR simulator session. Contact: Andrew Henley 954-785-1450.

Saturday, Jan 5, 2013 – Sebastian, FL – LoPresti First Saturday Charity Breakfast
Sebastian Airport (X26)

The LoPresti First Saturday Charity Breakfast Event January 5th will be ‘rockin’ out’ with live music from the 30’s and 40’s against a nostalgic background of the beautifully restored DC3 American Airlines Flagship Detroit. Speaker, Retired American Airline Pilot Tony DeSantis, will tell the story of this classic airplane’s place in aviation history. Join us as Judy DeSantis sings live 30’s and 40’s songs transporting you to the time when this beautiful 1937 bird first took to the skies. Step aboard the crew’s historical tour or flight on the oldest flying DC-3 in the world. Crew will show off their period dress, offering membership rides on this classic. This event will benefit the Flagship Detroit Foundation, to support the operation and maintenance of this aircraft as a flying tribute to all of American Airlines employees, past and present. Come in early to watch this vintage aircraft land. Flagship Detroit is the oldest flying DC-3 in the world. 9 am Full Hot Breakfast. 10 am – 11:30 Speaker Tony DeSantis, Retired American Airline Pilot. Dancing, Music, and Song throughout the event! This event promotes aviation to the general public, in particular to youth, aspiring to fly. Contact: Mimi Erskine 772-562-4757.

Saturday – Sunday, Jan 5-6, 2013 – Pompano Beach, FL – ATP Written Class
Pompano Beach Airpark (PMP)

American Flyers is conducting a weekend ATP written preparation class from January 5-6, 2013. Course fee is 495.00 and includes textbook and test supplement. On-site testing is available by appointment. Exam can be scheduled on Sunday afternoon at additional cost. Contact: Andrew Henley 954-785-1450.

Sunday, Jan 6, 2013 – Ft. Myers, FL – EAA 66 Fly in-Drive in Breakfast and Young Eagle Flights
Page Airport (FMY)

Best breakfast in Florida 0800-1100. Contact: Tom Irlbeck 239-540-5500.

Friday – Sunday, Jan 11-13, 2013 – Pompano Beach, FL – Commercial Pilot Written Class
Pompano Beach Airpark (PMP)

American Flyers is conducting a weekend Commercial Pilot written preparation class from January 11-13, 2013. Course fee is 395.00 and includes textbook and test supplement. On-site testing is available by appointment. Exam can be scheduled on Sunday afternoon at additional cost. Contact: Andrew Henley 954-785-1450. Email Website

Saturday, Jan 12, 2013 – New Smyrna Beach, FL – Timeless Wings Wheels Fly-In Breakfast
New Smyrna Beach Municipal Airport (KEVB)

Fly-in, walk-in or drive-in and join us for breakfast. Meet and chat with some of our Old Soldiers. A 5.00 donation will go to help rebuild the museum and support its Veterans into the Schools Project. Contact: Carole 386-314-4499.

Saturday – Sunday, Jan 12-13, 2013 – Pompano Beach, FL – CFI-Instrument Written Class
Pompano Beach Airpark (PMP)

American Flyers is conducting a weekend CFI-I written preparation class from January 12-13, 2013. Course fee is 295.00 and includes textbook and test supplement. On-site testing is available by appointment. Exam can be scheduled on Sunday afternoon at additional cost. Contact: Andrew Henley 954-785-1450.

Saturday – Sunday, Jan 19-20, 2013 – Pompano Beach, FL – Flight Instructor Refresher Clinic
Pompano Beach Airpark (PMP)

American Flyers is conducting a weekend FIRC seminar from January 19-20, 2013. Course fee is 175.00 and includes textbook. Contact: Andrew Henley 954-785-1450.

Friday – Sunday, Jan 25-27, 2013 – Pompano Beach, FL – Instrument Rating Written Class
Pompano Beach Airpark (PMP)

American Flyers is conducting a weekend Instrument Rating written preparation class from January 25-27, 2013. Course fee is 395.00 and includes textbook and test supplement. On-site testing is available by appointment. Exam can be scheduled on Sunday afternoon at additional cost. Contact: Andrew Henley 954-785-1450.

Friday – Sunday, Jan 25-27, 2013 – Pompano Beach, FL
CFI-Airplane and Fundamentals of Instruction Written Class
Pompano Beach Airpark (PMP)
American Flyers is conducting a weekend CFI-A / FOI written preparation class from January 25-27, 2013. Course fee is 360.00 and includes textbook and test supplement. On-site testing is available by appointment. Exam can be scheduled on Sunday afternoon at additional cost. Contact: Andrew Henley 954-785-1450.

Distributed by Viestly

Step By Step Pilot Guide For Flight Training Students

December 24, 2012 Leave a comment

Step By Step Pilot Guide For Flight Training StudentsAs an airline pilot you would fly passengers and cargo to destinations around the world. This can be an exciting and challenging job, but it involves a lot of responsibility. If you are keen on aircraft and travel this could be ideal for you.
To become an airline pilot, you will need to have good teamwork skills. You’ll need good concentration and hand-to-eye coordination. And you’ll also need to be able to remain calm, and take charge in an emergency.

Requirements to Become an Aircraft Pilot

Individuals interested in becoming an aircraft pilot will first need to determine what type of aircraft they want to fly. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) offers several types of pilot’s licenses, including private pilot, recreational pilot and sports pilot. Pilots who are paid to transport passengers or cargo must obtain a commercial pilot’s license. The types of aircraft that people fly include airplanes, helicopters, balloons, airship and gliders.

Aspiring pilots will need to complete a flight training program conducted by an authorized flight instructor from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). They must meet a certain number of flight hours, pass a written exam and perform a practical flight test before they can receive a pilot’s license. Flight training programs are available at colleges, technical schools and flight training centers. The following table outlines the core requirements to become an aircraft pilot.

Common Requirements

FAA Pilot Requirements

Step 1: Complete Flight School Training

Individuals interested in becoming an aircraft pilot need to attend an FAA-certified flight school or take private lessons from an FAA-certified instructor. These programs may be found at flight training schools, community colleges and technical schools. Topics covered include basic aerodynamics, aircraft components and flight controls, FAA regulations, aircraft weight and balance, basic navigation, flight planning and aircraft systems. Every hour of training and flight instruction is logged-in to ensure new pilots have completed the minimum hours needed to learn how to fly an airplane.

Step 2: Earn a Private Pilot License

Along with a minimum amount of flight hours, students need to demonstrate sufficient skills and knowledge to their flight instructor before they may earn an FAA private pilot’s license. This license, also known as a certificate, will allow them to fly an aircraft and carry passengers and baggage without compensation. Individuals will need to earn a commercial pilot’s license to get paid to transport people and property.

To earn a private pilot’s license, individuals must also be at least 17 years old. Private glider pilots or free flight balloon operators must be at least 16. An FAA-medical certificate is required. Aspiring pilots must pass a written exam and complete at least 40 hours of flight training. Half of this training must be with a flight instructor and at least 10 hours must be in solo flight time. A practical flight test is also required.

Step 3: Seek Employment

Individuals with a private pilot’s license may seek employment as a pilot. According to job postings for aircraft pilots from November 2012, employers sought pilots to test new aircraft, develop flight simulation programs and conduct national security missions. Employers preferred pilots with several years of flight experience and various pilot licenses.

Success Tip:

Consider a degree program
According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), most airline companies require pilots to have at least two years of college, although most have a bachelor’s degree.

Aviation College Degree Programs At Aviator College

Aviator College Aeronautical Science Program includes 565 flight hours and more multi-engine time than any other college or flight school. NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time requirements. Our large multi-engine fleet is equipped with Garmin 430s, and ASPEN EFIS is being introduced.

The Aeronautical Science Program prepares the graduate for a career in the aviation industry by providing a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, aeronautical sciences, aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry. The graduate will receive an Associate of Science Degree, ratings through Flight Instructor Multi-Engine, including the ratings necessary to obtain intermediate level employment. The flight training sequence for this program consists of of four flight-training modules plus additional flight training as specified in each option.

ENROLL NOW FOR WINTER CLASSES

CONTACT AVIATOR COLLEGE

Phone (772) 672-8222
Toll Free 1-800-635-9032

Distributed by Viestly

Are Ready To Be A Commercial Pilot

December 19, 2012 Leave a comment

Are Ready To Be A Commercial Pilot

Basic Requirements for a Commercial Pilots

Here are just a few of the basic requirements for the Commercial License.

  • You must be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English Language
  • You must be able to obtain a 2nd class medical certificate
  • You must be 18 years of age
  • You must hold at least a private pilot license
  • You must have received and logged the appropriate ground and flight training for the Commercial License
  • You must have 250 hours total flight time
  • You must have 100 hours flight time as pilot in command
  • You must have 50 hours of cross country flight time as pilot in command
  • You must pass the FAA Commercial Pilot written exam
  • You must pass the Commercial Pilot Oral and Practical Exam
Training For Commercial Pilot License

Training for the commercial license is not all that different than from your private license. Then difference is in the tolerances that you are going to be held to. In addition you will learn some new manoeuvres along the way and be required to demonstrate them to proficiency on the check ride. The main goal before beginning your training for the commercial license is to build your time towards the 250 total time requirement. Included in that time is 100 hours as pilot in command, and 50 hours of cross-country. Since most folks have about 60hrs after they complete their private license you have some time to build. Even if you choose to obtain an instrument rating to help knock out some of that time you still have a ways to go to reach 250 hours total time.

One of the most important parts of you commercial training likes any other license or rating is the required aeronautical knowledge. Once you are a commercial pilot there is a whole new world of flying and regulations you have to know. Specifically the limitations of your commercial license and what you can and cannot do while getting paid to fly and what requires addition training or authorization. After your instructor is confident in you are ready for a check ride.

Testing For Commercial Pilot License
The FAA Written

The written test for the Commercial License like all other licenses and ratings is an 80 question computerized test. The questions cover a variety of subjects including, commercial operations, complex aircraft systems, performance calculations and aerodynamics.

The FAA Oral Exam

The oral exam will consist of various questions related to commercial operations and limitations, weather, cross country planning, and much more. The examiner will most likely have you plan a cross-country and then discuss your flight planning and give you some scenarios to evaluate your thought process as well as level of knowledge. Once the examiner is satisfied then it’s on to the flight portion.

The FAA Practical Exam

The practical exam or flight portion of the check ride will be a demonstration of your ability to fly to the standards of a commercial pilot. The standards are tighter but by the time you reach the required flight time the demands being placed upon you are not excessive. During the flight you will have to demonstrate all the typical flight manoeuvres (stalls, steep turns, slow flight), in addition to chandelles, lazy 8’s, and 8’s on pylon’s as required for the commercial license. As far as emergency procedures go, you can expect a simulated engine failure, in addition to emergency operations of some of the aircrafts systems such as the landing gear. You will also need to demonstrate your proficiency in specialty landings such as short field landings, soft field landings and no flap landings. Once the examiner is satisfied you are issued some fresh ink on a new slip of paper that is your commercial pilot license. You can now get paid to fly instead of having to pay for it all your self.

Job Duties and Tasks for: “Commercial Pilot”

1) Check aircraft prior to flights to ensure that the engines, controls, instruments, and other systems are functioning properly.

2) Check baggage or cargo to ensure that it has been loaded correctly.

3) Choose routes, altitudes, and speeds that will provide the fastest, safest, and smoothest flights.

4) Consider airport altitudes, outside temperatures, plane weights, and wind speeds and directions in order to calculate the speed needed to become airborne.

5) Contact control towers for takeoff clearances, arrival instructions, and other information, using radio equipment.

6) Coordinate flight activities with ground crews and air-traffic control, and inform crew members of flight and test procedures.
7) File instrument flight plans with air traffic control so that flights can be coordinated with other air traffic.

8) Monitor engine operation, fuel consumption, and functioning of aircraft systems during flights.

9) Obtain and review data such as load weights, fuel supplies, weather conditions, and flight schedules in order to determine flight plans, and to see if changes might be necessary.
10) Order changes in fuel supplies, loads, routes, or schedules to ensure safety of flights.

11) Plan and formulate flight activities and test schedules, and prepare flight evaluation reports.

12) Plan flights, following government and company regulations, using aeronautical charts and navigation instruments.

13) Request changes in altitudes or routes as circumstances dictate.

14) Start engines, operate controls, and pilot airplanes to transport passengers, mail, or freight, while adhering to flight plans, regulations, and procedures.

15) Use instrumentation to pilot aircraft when visibility is poor.

16) Check the flight performance of new and experimental planes.

17) Conduct in-flight tests and evaluations at specified altitudes and in all types of weather, in order to determine the receptivity and other characteristics of equipment and systems.

18) Co-pilot aircraft, or perform captain’s duties if required.

19) Fly with other pilots or pilot-license applicants to evaluate their proficiency.

20) Instruct other pilots and student pilots in aircraft operations.

21) Perform minor aircraft maintenance and repair work, or arrange for major maintenance.

22) Supervise other crew members.

23) Teach company regulations and procedures to other pilots.

24) Write specified information in flight records, such as flight times, altitudes flown, and fuel consumption.

25) Pilot airplanes or helicopters over farmlands at low altitudes to dust or spray fields with fertilizers, fungicides, or pesticides.

26) Rescue and evacuate injured persons. –SOURCE

Flight School Pro Pilot Programs

The programs at Aviator Academy are designed to provide what the airline industry demands of future commercial pilots. The training you will receive at Aviator is one of the most intensive and challenging programs offered in aviation today.

During your flight training you will fly a total of 259 hours, of which 200 hours will be in a multi-engine aircraft. The ground school portion is a structured classroom environment. You will receive a minimum of 643 instructional hours, including all of the ground and flight training. Student housing is on a contract basis, pricing is selected from the options below, terms included in the students’ enrollment agreement are as follows: Private Pilot program includes 6 months of housing, if you come with a PPL 5 months will be included. Commercial Pilot program includes 4 months of housing, if you come with a PPL 3 months will be included. After your flight training, you will have the opportunity to become an entry level flight instructor.

Contact Aviator
Enroll Now
Schedule a Visit

Distributed by Viestly

Flight Training Experience For Pilot Students

December 17, 2012 Leave a comment

Flight Training Experience For Pilot StudentsFlorida weather provides optimal flying time and some of the best flight training facilities are located in sunny Florida. Location, quality of flight training programs and its flight instructors are the contributing factors in finding a good flight school for your flight training.

The flight instructor is the cornerstone of aviation safety. Training under the qualified and competent flight instructors will help you catch the material faster, give you credibility, and you will learn things you might not learn with other instructors. Your primary instructor should be at least a certificated flight instructor (CFI). Ensure that your instrument instructor has an instrument instructor rating (CFII). Instrument training received from a non-rated instructor can cause problems when it comes to meeting FAA requirements.

The FAA has adopted an operational training concept that places the full responsibility for student training on the authorized flight instructor. In this role, the instructor assumes the total responsibility for training the student pilot in all the knowledge areas and skills necessary to operate safely and competently as a certificated pilot in the National Airspace System. This training will include airmanship skills, pilot judgment and decision-making, and accepted good operating practices.

An FAA certificated flight instructor has to meet broad flying experience requirements, pass rigid knowledge and practical tests, and demonstrate the ability to apply recommended teaching techniques before being certificated. In addition, the flight instructor’s certificate must be renewed every 24 months by showing continued success in training pilots, or by satisfactorily completing a flight instructor’s refresher course or a practical test designed to upgrade aeronautical knowledge, pilot proficiency, and teaching techniques.

AOPA Research –The Flight Training Experience

As part of AOPA Flight Training Student Retention Initiative, the research was performed to identify overall flight training experience for pilot students. Outlined below are key findings. (source)

  • Recreational goals are the most common reason for learning to fly and most students learn outside the Part 141 environment
  • Students come to the process through referrals and place a premium on personal interaction with the aviation community
  • The flight instructor’s performance is especially important
  • Flying and the sense of accomplishment it delivers is a powerful influence that mitigates quality issues and results in an overall positive experience
  • The notion of an “aviation community” that shares this experience is a key motivator and emerged as a distinct idea in the model
A Unique Experience

Eleven distinct factors emerged to define the expectations students have for the flight training experience. They are correlated into four broad areas:

  • Educational Quality: Offering effective training from professional instructors who are dedicated to students’ success
  • Customer Focus: Demonstrating professionalism in facilities, equipment
  • Community: Emphasizing social connections and recognizing accomplishments
  • Information Sharing: Equalizing the power relationship between flight training providers and students—educating and empowering the consumer

For complete research findings please visit AOPA.

Flight Training Programs at Aviator College

A pilot training program is dependent on the quality of the ground and flight instruction the student pilot receives. A good flight instructor will have a thorough understanding of the learning process, knowledge of the fundamentals of teaching, and the ability to communicate effectively with the student pilot.

Faculty & Instructors

Aviator Faculty and Flight Training Instructors are hired directly from the ranks of our graduating student population and have more than 200 hours of multi-engine flight time. The Faculty at Aviator College hold a minimum of a Bachelors Degree and teach all flight training, classroom based courses. The Academy Flight Instructors are hired directly from the ranks of Aviator graduates. The Flight Training Instructors work one-on-one with their students in the air. Students often complete the entire program with the same Flight Training Instructor, which allows them to find a comfortable relationship and learn faster. Flight Training Instructors are available to fly with students 24 hours-a-day, rain or shine. We encourage our Flight Training Instructors to provide actual instrument flight time with their students whenever possible to gain real-world experience. Our Flight Training Instructors continue to grow in their skills while flying in the high density traffic operations of Florida’s airspace.

To speak with an instructor contact the college at 772-672-8222.

Our instructors have more than 200 hours of multi-engine time before they begin instructing. Our instructors have been hired by the regional airlines starting at 500-1000 hours total time. To-date, none of our instructors hired by the regional airlines have failed to pass indoctrination and initial training.

Contact Aviator
Enroll Now
Schedule a Visit

Distributed by Viestly

Pilot Career, Pilot Training and Pilot Schools

December 14, 2012 Leave a comment

Pilot Career, Pilot Training and Pilot SchoolsBeing an airline pilot can be one of the world’s best jobs. Pilots who have worked for a company for 10 years could have annual earnings close to $300,000. It is possible for a pilot to have even higher earnings during the course of a career. A pilot might only work 8 days in a month. Pilots have retirement and benefit packages that exceed what most other professionals earn. They get free or reduced rate travel. They get reduced rate hotel and car rentals. Pilots even have the time off to use these fringe benefits.

A pilot must be very knowledgeable on a variety of subjects. To be a professional pilot you must have command of the following: (for a complete list, visit source jetcareers)

  1. Understand theory of flight: This requires a fundamental understanding of physics. While there is no requirement to understand mathematics above algebra (although it helps if you do understand higher math), you do have to be able to understand and apply the concepts of physics. A pilot must understand laws of motion, mass, inertia, pressure, temperature, fluids and gasses. This is the only way to understand aerodynamics (subsonic and supersonic), aircraft performance (including aircraft loading), hydroplaning and system operations and limitations.
  2. Understand meteorology: This, too, is rooted in physics. A pilot must not only be able to interpret the weather that he or she is provided, but must also be able to make judgments as to the validity of the weather forecasts themselves. Often the pilot is the only one that can observe weather phenomena, and must be able to report what he or she is seeing accurately as well as make a quick analysis of the conditions. This includes how the changes may affect the weather forecast itself and how those changes may affect the safety of the flight.
  3. Understand aircraft systems: All machines use the principles of physics to operate, and so a pilot must understand the areas of physics that apply. In addition, a pilot must understand aircraft maintenance, otherwise there is no way to tell if the mechanics did their job right. It is not enough to trust the mechanic; your life, and the lives of your passengers, are at stake.
  4. Understand navigation: Navigation is a broad subject, with many important aspects. There is much more to navigation than simply getting from one point to the next. First, a pilot must understand how maps and charts are constructed in order to properly interpret them. There are many ways of making charts, and each has advantages as well as pitfalls. Charts made for pilots to land in poor weather have their own sets of limitations and problems. A pilot must fully understand the safety margins that are incorporated into charts, and how they affect each phase of flight. There are times that an altitude or course deviation of just 100 feet could be dangerous. A pilot who does not understand charting will be flying inefficiently at best, and could even risk a crash-(SOURCE).
Types of Pilot Schools

Most airports have pilot training available, either by flying schools or individual flight instructors. A school will usually provide a wide variety of training aids, special facilities, and greater flexibility in scheduling. A number of colleges and universities also provide pilot training as a part of their curricula.

There are two types of schools. One is normally referred to as an “FAA-approved school” and the other as a “non-approved school.”

Enrollment in an FAA-approved flight school usually ensures a high quality of training. FAA-approved schools meet prescribed standards with respect to equipment, facilities, personnel, and curricula. However, many excellent pilot schools find it impractical to qualify for the FAA certification, and are referred to as non-approved schools.

One of the differences between FAA-approved schools and non-approved schools is that fewer flight hours are required to qualify for a pilot certificate in an FAA-approved school. The requirement for a private pilot certificate is 40 hours in a non-approved school, and 35 hours in an approved school. However, since most people require 60 to 75 hours of training, this difference may be insignificant for a private pilot certificate.

Check for pilot school locations online or contact your local FSDO for pilot schools in your area.

Flight School and Flight Training Programs

For more than 27 years Aviator has been the leader in multi-engine flight training. We have provided over 5000 professional pilots to the airline industry, both nationally and worldwide, through our Professional Pilot Flight Training Programs. Our FAA-certified Part 141 approved flight programs provide students with the skills and experience demanded by today’s commercial aviation industry. Aviator is accredited by the ACCSC (Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges).

Our Professional Pilot Program is set in a flight training, structured environment to ensure the student receives the knowledge that is required to be a professional pilot. This program is from 0 hours to over 250 hours, of which 200 hours will be multi-engine time. The program includes Private Pilot Single Engine through the Multi-Engine Flight Instructor Certificate. Cross Country flying is coast-to-coast, if desired.

Why Choose Aviator Flight School For Your Pilot Training
  • Licensed by the State of Florida Commission For Independent Education License #4155
  • Aviator Flight Training Academy is a Division of Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology, which is licensed by the State of Florida Commission for Independent Education and Accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges.
  • 27 Years in the Flight Training Industry
  • To date, Aviator has trained over 5000 pilots for the commercial airline industry
  • Only School Offering 200 Hours of Multi-Engine Time
  • Aviator is the only flight school that has a full 200 hours of multi-engine time included in our program
  • No Flight Training Devices (Simulators)
  • FTDs are not used towards your flight time for any ratings
  • Approved by the Federal Department of Education to offer Title IV Loans
  • Aviator has the ability to offer students federal funding on approved accredited programs
  • Job Placement Assistance with Regional Airlines
  • Aviator offers job placement assistance for our graduates
  • “A” Rating with United States Better Business Bureau
  • Classroom Environment – All classes taught in our educational center, NOT online

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Flight Training Requirements For International Students

December 12, 2012 Leave a comment

Flight Training Requirements For International StudentsAll non US citizens planning to begin their flight training in USA should notify the flight school of their choice in advance that they intend to start flight training because the flight school also needs to register online with TSA before you begin flight training. If the flight school is already registered with TSA, it might be useful to bring all required documents and information for the application to the flight school and register there, as you will have to include training details on your application. This will allow the flight school to upload required documents to TSA and also to make copies for the flight school”s record-keeping requirements.

I-20 Student Visa

The first or initial step in preparation for attending a flight school in USA is making sure you have the right visa.

Understanding Your I-20

The I-20 is a multi-purpose document issued by a government approved, U.S. educational institution certifying that you have been admitted to a full-time study program and that you have demonstrated sufficient financial resources to stay in the U.S. The I-20 is officially titled the “Certificate of Eligibility” because with it, you are “eligible” to apply for an F-1 student visa at a U.S. embassy or consulate abroad. Your spouse or children will also each need their own I-20 to obtain F-2 dependent status, if desired.

Getting the I-20 from a U.S. school is not enough to become a legal F-1 student; you must also be allowed entry to the U.S. as an F-1, or be approved for a change of status from another type of non-immigrant visa.

How the I-20 is used by the student outside the U.S.

After receiving an I-20 from their school, an international student must make an appointment to apply for the F-1 visa at the local U.S. embassy or consulate in their country (the visa is needed to be allowed entry into the U.S.). The student must present both the F-1 visa and the I-20 to a U.S. Immigration inspector upon arrival at the port-of-entry.

How the I-20 is used by a student inside the U.S.

Once you have arrived in the U.S. and passed through the border inspections process, the I-20 is used as identification purposes and proof of your legal and academic status. If you get a job on or off-campus, you will be required to show the I-20 to your employer during the hiring process. Off-campus employment information will be printed on page 3 of your I-20.

Traveling with the I-20

If you will be traveling abroad, take your I-20 with you. The I-20 is required to reapply for a visa if you need one and for re-entering the U.S.

Does Everyone Need an I-20?

Some international students do not need I-20s. If you are maintaining another nonimmigrant status in the U.S., you do not need an 1-20 and may be able to attend school full- or part-time. Dependent children in E, H, I, J, L, M, N, 0, P, R, or S status need to change status after their 21st birthday.

The I-20 Information Data Source

The Aviator College of Aeronautical Science accepts aspiring International Students who wish to complete an Associate of Science Degree in Aeronautical Science. The Aviator Flight Training Academy accepts International Students who wish to complete a certificate program or earn specific licenses. The Degree Program will take up to a 24 months for completion. Students complete five consecutive semesters. The last two semesters contain an internship component. Interns are required to instruct a minimum of 153 hours each of the two semesters along with completing the General Education Requirements. Transfer Credit may be given for the General Education requirements and previous flight training completed. Send transcripts and copies of any current flight licenses to the Registrars Office for determination.

Aviator’s International Student Services Department provides guidance to international students. Staff members assist students in interpreting U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) regulations. Services include assisting visa holders with travel signatures, new I-20’s, social security and visa extensions, international student orientation, as well as other immigration matters.

Visa Information For Flight Training Degree Program At Aviator College

If you are planning to come to the U.S. for the Aeronautical Science Degree Program (including flight training), you must enter on a Student Visa. The College is approved by the INS to issue paperwork for visas under the Foreign Student Exchange Visitor Programs.

Aviator College provides a certificate of eligibility (I-20) to all admitted international students. The form is used to apply for the F-1 or M-1 Visa. The form verifies to U.S. immigration officials the student is academically qualified to attend the College, and has sufficient funds to cover the required period of study, and that subsequent funds will be available for the future. Students must demonstrate proof of financial support at the time of application.

Aviator policy states that students are required to attend for one full semester when entering the United States on a College provided I-20 form. Aviator College will not release a student to another educational institution until the student completes one semester.

  1. Upon receipt of your deposit and the Application for Enrollment, you will receive the original I-20 or IAP-66 student visa form via overnight mail at the address provided. Remember you must provide a complete physical address in order for delivery to occur.
  2. You must take the original visa form to the U.S. Embassy in your country for approval. Please inform admissions of your tentative arrival date and your flight information so a representative may meet you at the airport to welcome you to the USA and Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology. If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact us.
  3. If you have applied for a visa you will also need to register with S.E.V.I.S . at http://www.fmjfee.com – see their website for details.
  4. Contact your local US embassy to make an appointment, and ensure you have the required documentation and follow the correct procedure for the visa interview. READ Your local US embassy website extremely carefully!

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