Home > Uncategorized > Which Flight Training Is Right For You, Modular or Integrated

Which Flight Training Is Right For You, Modular or Integrated

Which Flight Training Is Right For You, Modular or IntegratedAny student wishing to become a pilot is learning one true fact very fast. Flight training to become a pilot is extremely expensive. In addition to money, time and commitment plays an integral part as well. Whether you want to fly for fun on the weekends or want to become a captain of a major airline company do a thorough research so your money is properly invested!

Pilot training is available on-site at most airports, either through an FAA-certificated (approved) pilot school* or through other training providers. An approved school may be able to provide a greater variety of training aids, dedicated facilities, and more flexibility in scheduling. A number of colleges and universities also provide pilot training as a part of their curricula.

Flight school you choose will be the foundation of your training. The type of flight school you choose and the experience of your flight instructor will be crucial in your pilot training. Choose wisely. Create two checklists to bring with you on your flight school research. One list should be a flight school checklist and the other should be a flight instructor checklist. Some sample checklist items are:

  1. How long has the school been in business?
  2. What is the school’s safety record?
  3. What is the availability of aircraft?
  4. How long has the instructor been teaching?
  5. How many students has the instructor taught for the license or rating you seek?
Integrated vs. Modular Flight Training

What are the facts concerning Modular and Integrated training? That is a popular topic among many pilots and has been for many years. There are some who prefer Integrated and others who prefer Modular, but for someone trying to choose a route it can get very confusing very quickly. When people are faced with a decision to choose between two of anything, the best way is to compare each and list both positive and negative. Make a pros and con list.

What Is Modular Flight Training

Modular training (which was known as ‘the self improver’ route) basically involves the trainee getting one license at a time. This route will take them from a PPL (Private Pilots License), through hour building and then onto ATPL theory (which could be done whilst hour building, for example, to save time). Upon successful completion of the 14 exams, you can then begin the CPL, IR and MEP. 150 PPL flying hours are required before starting the CPL. The CPL, IR (instrument rating) and MEP (Multi-engine Piston rating) can be completed in any order. Other modules can then be added on top of this to prepare the student for multi-crew Jet aircraft flying. The MCC (Multi Crew Co-operation course) and JOC (Jet Orientation Course) are both offered by numerous flight schools. The first aims to build up your experience in a multi-crew environment, and the latter provides you with Jet Simulator time, during which students will fly in IFR conditions in a multi-pilot role. Emphasis is placed on developing CRM (Crew Resource Management) skills, which is a vital part of the job. You will end up with an fATPL (frozen Airline Transport Pilots License), which allows you to apply for the airlines.

Modular students are not tied to any particular company, and have the freedom to complete the training at their own speed, perhaps whilst earning. This route is ideal for those who want to stay in work whilst they train and, as you probably know by now, it often works out to be much cheaper than the Integrated route.

What Is Integrated Flight Training

Integrated flight training is mainly a Modular flight training all balled up into one full-time course. Instead you will do single engine flight training (over 100 hours) followed by some Multi Engine time and then the CPL skills test. You will finish this section with an MEP rating and CPL license.

You will train, full-time, at one FTO (Flight Training Operator). Many FTO’s provide Integrated Courses, and most require the applicant to sit an assessment which is a pre-requisite to beginning training. These assessments will test Hand-Eye co-ordination, maths and physics skills, and will include interviews and/or group assessments as well as simulator tests.

If you pass an FTO’s assessment, you will be offered a place on their course. No previous flying time is required but a trial flight or two is, in my view, vital (to see if you actually enjoy it)! In reality, you’ll find that most will have flown previously.

When onto a course, the Integrated route generally starts with ATPL groundschool, where all 14 exams are studied for and sat over a 6 to 8 month period. Following this, trainees will then begin flight training, which is usually done abroad.

Following the CPL Skills test, Integrated students will then start the IR course where suddenly, the weather in Blightly is favorable for your training! This will be completed in multi-engine aircraft, and culminates in the IR rating being issued. From there, students go straight on to complete the MCC/JOC.

Many Integrated courses have added extras that can include CV workshops, extra modules (Often covering other areas of aviation, to give students a more broad knowledge of the industry) and foundation degrees. For example, OAA include ‘First Officer Fundamentals’ with their APPFO Integrated course, as well as a Foundation Degree. However, this is not to say that Modular providers don’t give you some extra goodies! ProPilot, a Coventry based ATPL groundschool provider, offer ‘Pilot Development Days’ which aim to provide students with a broader knowledge of the subjects they are studying (often provided by experts in the relevent field).

At the end of both Modular and Integrated training, students will have all of the licenses that make up what us EU bunch call the fATPL (frozen Airline Transport Pilots License). From here, you will be in a position to apply to the airlines, where the fATPL will become ‘unfrozen’ when 1500hours have been flown. Once un-frozen, you are technically able to advance to captaincy. Other avenues can be taken upon gaining an fATPL of course, such as Flight Instruction or Bush Flying.

Positives and Negatives For Integrated Flight Training

  • More focused, full-time training
  • All training is done at one FTO, meaning a complete training record is available to airlines
  • Lots of “added extras” included in the course (i.e. foundation degree, CV workshops, modules covering other areas of the industry).
  • Some FTO’s will pay you back if your training ceases
  • Graduate services and Cadet holding pools. Airlines will approach their partnered FTO’s and take on a number of Integrated cadets as and when required.
  • A lot of airlines take more Integrated than Modular pilots. Some airlines have exclusive agreements with FTO’s, meaning they will only take low-hour pilots from an Integrated source. This does not mean that modular pilots won’t get hired!
  • More expensive
  • You can’t ‘pay as you go’, license to license. However, you will pay in installments as you train which gives financial security.

Positives and Negatives For Modular Flight Training
  • A possible cheaper option
  • You can fit training around other commitments (work, family etc…)
  • Training can be completed to a more ‘Integrated’ timescale (Integrated Modular)
  • You aren’t tied to any particular company
  • Pay as you go’ payment is an option. This gives you more control over funds.
  • Training can be less focused
  • Takes longer (not necessarily a bad thing, it depends on your situation)The vast majority of modular FTO’s don’t have contracts/agreements with airlines, where they will take cadets from a holding pool. Source
Modular Flight Training With Aviator Flight Training Academy

The Aviator Flight Training Academy offers a full line of flight training courses to meet the individual needs of each student.

Multi, Instrument, & Commercial
  • 150 Hours of Multi-Engine
  • Cross Country flying coast-to-coast
  • Price includes flight instruction and all ground instruction
  • Course time is eight weeks or less
  • Writtens and Checkrides are extra
  • NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time
  • To enroll you must hold your PPL and 100 hours total time
  • Eight weeks of housing included (one person per bedroom)

$ 29,995.00
Financing Available for those who qualify

Multi_Engine Rating
  • 10 Hours Multi-Engine
  • Pre & Post Flight, Ground Instruction
  • NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time

$ 3,100.00

For a full list of flight training option, contact aviator or schedule a visit.
Talk to a flight training instructor 772-672-8222.

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