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Pilot Characteristics, Fitness and Performance

Pilot Characteristics, Fitness and Performance

Personal Characteristics

Commercial pilots must pass a rigorous physical and have vision correctable to 20/20. Health issues of any kind can prevent you from becoming a commercial pilot. Pilots must think and act quickly in emergencies, be able to memorize volumes of FAA and airline regulations, have good manual dexterity, understand meteorology and the mechanics of flight, and be capable of high-level attention to detail.

Professionalism and knowledge are now prerequisites for entrance into the worldwide airline industry. Fast paced, “fast track” programs, or self-study courses will not meet the new airline industry standards.

Pilot Training Program With Aviator Flight Training Academy 259 Flight Hours

Aviator Flight Training Academy offers professional pilot training programs with a minimum of 200 hours of multi-engine time. The flight school has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator), large classrooms and individual briefing rooms.

Important Qualities

Communication skills. Pilots must speak clearly when conveying information to air traffic controllers. They must also listen carefully for instructions.
Depth perception. Pilots must be able to see clearly and judge the distance between objects.
Detail oriented. Pilots must watch many systems at the same time. Even small changes can have significant effects, so they must constantly pay close attention to many details.
Monitoring skills. Pilots must regularly watch over gauges and dials to make sure that all systems are in working order.
Problem-solving skills. Pilots must be able to identify complex problems and figure out appropriate solutions. When a plane encounters turbulence, for example, pilots assess the weather conditions, select a calmer airspace, and request a route change from air traffic control.
Quick reaction time. Because warning signals can appear with no notice, pilots must be able to respond quickly to any impending danger.
Teamwork. Pilots work closely with air traffic controllers and flight dispatchers. As a result, they need to be able to coordinate actions on the basis of the feedback they receive.

Pilot Performance

Written by EAI.

Pilot performance is about a couple of factors: airmanship, personality, crew management. They relate to the pilot as a person, his or her ability to make good judgments and decisions and to be able to communicate effectively with others. Remaining cool and rational at all times and instill confidence in the crew and passengers.

Airmanship

The ability to show common sense, have the highest standards and good aviation skills. Meaning to fly the aircraft well, think clearly and make good and sound decisions so that the safe outcome of a flight is never in doubt. Clear communication skills and getting along with other pilots, maybe new to the operation, is very important as is to keep his/her cool in more difficult situations and being very professional as a pilot as to become a good example to others in the profession.

Personality

Defining the persons character properties. It is in part genetic and part learned through experience, education and the way we were brought up by our parents. For a part this can be modified, relearned if you wish. As we get older we (should) become more mature in our ways of thinking and our behavior in human relations and our job. This will not be for everyone though, sadly.

Crew management

A pilot in command needs to get on with other people, crew people for example. He or she is ultimately responsible for the aircraft, its safe operation and all onboard. The crew (the PIC is also a crew member) should co-operate as a well oiled machine, essential for safe flight and they should regularly follow line operations flight and crew resource management training to keep current.

Characteristics of a good pilot in command are amongst others, to be a good and competent pilot with firm technical knowledge about the aircraft and good flying skills, a good leader able to inspire others and getting the best out of his crew and consult them in the decision making process, always thinking ahead of the situation and making sound decisions.

Perfection

Pilots should try to attain perfection in their flying, this applies to private and commercial pilots alike. Just aim to do it right always. Try to perfect your flying skills all the time and learn from your mistakes.
A nearly perfect pilot (is there such a thing as a perfect pilot?) is consistent, flexible, safe, accurate and dependable. He or she is also confident (not too much though) in their decisions. This pilot never stops learning from his own experience and from others too and tries to fly to the highest standards, improving along the way and be and sets examples for others and will always helps others in their career.

Part 1. Fitness to Fly

Pilots who become incapacitated during flight are a real danger to passengers and the aircraft. The risk is much less with a multi-crew flight but if this happens during a bad weather night approach in a busy environment it could develop in an real emergency real fast. And for private pilots flying with passengers during low visibility conditions the danger is the same.

Medical examinations

Before an aspiring pilot may fly solo (and to keep exercising the privileges of the license) he/she must pass the required regular medical examinations for the license. There are several so called classes, with different requirements depending on the license. Commercial pilots usually must be able to pass the highest requirements and standards.

These examinations are designed to exclude those medical conditions not compatible with flying.

Heart diseases

Humans with a possible change on a heart condition as coronary artery disease, which is likely to cause chest pain and a heart attack or infarct, must be detected in a early stage to make sure that this condition does not develop during flight, with possible fatal results.
The risk factors for a coronary artery disease are: family history, smoking, elevated blood pressure or cholesterol level, lack of exercise, high blood sugar level, overweight and stress. All but family history can be dealed with by living a healthy life, diet and exercise.

Blood sugar

The human body needs glucose for energy and this gets into the system through food. The level of glucose is regulated by the pancreas, which secretes insulin into the blood stream to keep the level of glucose at the right level. Problems can arise if the pancreas delivers too much (low blood sugar, hypoglycemia) or not enough insulin (diabetes).
Low blood sugar can also occur by not eating enough (think of missing meals or not drinking enough) and this can cause fainting, shakiness, nervousness and or cold sweating. High blood sugar can cause kidney failure, blindness and heart attacks if not treated properly. Pilots who develop diabetes are likely to loose their license.
For pilots it is important to eat and drink regularly to keep their blood sugar at normal levels. A good breakfast, lunch and dinner and a small sandwich with a mixed filling in between and drinking at enough fluids should prevent low blood sugar levels and the pilot fit to fly.

Illness

On this we can be short: if there is any doubt about the pilots ability to fly the aircraft safely due to any illness – its a clear decision: do not fly! Minor illnesses as: sore throat, hay fever, head ache, diarrhea can be cured by mild medications or even be overcome by drinking clear fluids. Over the counter medicines should be avoided because of possible unknown side effects on the body or brain. Think of anti-histamines which are known to cause sleepiness or inattention.
Mental illness or a psychiatric problem could render a pilot incapable of flying an aircraft safely and a medical examination is required with follow ups to assess if the pilot safe again to fly after treatment or therapy.

Part II. Fitness to Fly

Any nervous system depressant could be fatal when flying as a pilot. We all should be very aware that this is a combination that is bound to cause accidents, it does that in normal road traffic and aviation is no different there.

Alcohol

This substance gets into the brain very easily, mainly because alcohol is fat-soluble and the brain contains a large amount of it. It can be detected even after 14 hours of consuming a normal standard drink (which has about 10 – 15 mg of alcohol).

The effects of alcohol on a human ability to make decisions, good judgments and balance are well known. And these effects have proven disastrous in daily road traffic and aviation. Every year, people die because someone thought that one more drink was not a problem.
Obviously, as with driving: alcohol and flying do not go together.

Time between bottle and throttle

Rule makers have decided that at least 10 hours (some say even 12) should pass after the last drink and starting to fly. Needless to say that if the person is flat out drunk, he or she will not be able to fly safely 10 hours later. Wait at least 24 hours before even thinking of getting back into the cockpit.
There is no place in aviation for the alcoholic pilot. It is as simple as that. If the pilot is diagnosed as such the pilot may not fly again until it is clear that drinking will never be a problem again. Counseling may be part of the process of recovery from a drinking problem.

Drugs

Mood and mind influencing drugs as LSD, speed, marijuana, cocaine, heroine or others have radical effects on the brain possibly damaging it. Its use is therefore prohibited for pilots. No exception there, really, if you are on these drugs: get out of the cockpit a.s.a.p!

Medication

The drugs mentioned above can not be classified as safe. However, mild drugs as pain killers, paracetamol or aspirin can be used as long as there is no side effect for the pilot. Nasal sprays (hay fever) can be used safely as these normally do not enter the blood stream. Take care though with antihistamines which are used orally, these are known to have sleepiness as a side effect.

Some types of sleeping pills can be used by pilots, these are usually the short acting variant and should have little side effects. They are mainly used by pilots crossing multiple time zones. Do consult an AME if you think you might need them.

Drugs not suitable for pilots are stimuli for the nervous system as anti-depressants, anti-anxiety (Valium) and or strong pain killers.
Antibiotics are used to fight a bacterial infection in the body. These could have side effects possibly worse than the illness itself, consult an AME before taking any of these drugs. Which is also advisable to do if you think you have a condition that would need drugs to counter it. It is far better to be safe than sorry.

Smoking

While not directly related to a danger in aviation, smoking can cause problems later on in life by increasing the chance on a possible life threatening disease. Lung cancer, asthma, strokes or heart problems are all related to smoking in one way or another.
Not smoking contributes to a healthy and long life.

Exercise

Regular exercising has proven to increase your health and stamina. Daily walking of at least 30 minutes, using the stairs, weekly running (meaning not training for a marathon) and bicycling will keep you healthy and in good shape as well!

The I’m safe checklist.

For complete list and details, please visit the source.

Distributed by Viestly

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How To Choose Your Flight School

How To Choose Your Flight SchoolThere are over 300 two- and four-year colleges with aviation programs and aviation schools in the United States and world-wide that offer various aviation programs (including non-engineering programs) to students interested in pursuing a career in aviation.

Without any aviation experience on which to base your decision, selecting a good school can be a formidable task. Checklists are an aviation mainstay that ensure all procedures are accomplished and, therefore, make for safe flights. This same procedure can be applied to selecting a good flight school.

Flight School Checklist
  • Types of Flight Schools. Although all flight schools train pilots how to fly aircraft in a safe manner, key differences exist between the two primary forms of flight schools. Federal Aviation Regulation, or FAR, Part 141 flight schools are highly structured training centers with well-defined and FAA-approved curricula. In contrast, FAR Part 61 schools are less-structured schools without a defined curriculum. Although these schools often are less expensive for students to attend, they require individuals to complete more flight training hours than Part 141 centers.
  • Flight School Cost. When looking for a flight school, do not make the mistake of picking a flight school just because they are cheap. The quality of flight training that you receive is very important. Just because one school offers a much cheaper rate doesn’t mean that you will get the same quality of training as a school that charges a little more. You have to do your own homework and research each school before you start your training.
  • Flight Training Instructors. What students learn in a flight training school highly depends on quality of flight training programs and on how efficient the flight instructors are. That’s why, it is important to check on the capabilities and qualities of the instructors to ensure efficient and effective flight training. Flight Instructors teach students how to fly by demonstrating and explaining, on the ground and in the air, basic principles of flight, aerial navigation, communications procedures, weather factors, and Federal Aviation Regulations all pilots must adhere too. They also prepare their students for various exams to help them earn their pilot certificate(s) and rating(s).
  • Visiting the School/Talk To Pilot Students. Tour the facility you are considering and meet the faculty. Do they treat you in a professional manner? If the flight school doesn’t have a professional feeling and a business-like attitude then maybe the school isn’t right for you. Ask to speak with a flight instructor. Also important is to talk to students attending the flight school you are considering, they will have 1st hand knowledge of what to expect.
  • Flight Training Time Frame. The time it takes to undergo flight lesson has a marked effect on a pilot’s training success in the aircraft. Individuals who fly daily retain a greater degree of flight-related knowledge and muscle memory, allowing them to finish their flight training in fewer flight hours than it would take people who fly once per week or less. Pilots who finish their training in less flight time also save money, allowing them to put their cash to other uses.
  • Flight Training Fleet and Aircraft Maintenance. Make sure the place is well-maintained and everything is in order. Check the condition of the fleet and the surrounding environment. If the facility is cluttered, unattended to or even run down, chances are your training will be the same. How many planes are in the fleet? Are they properly maintained and do you have access to the maintenance logs? A training plane should be serviced after every 100 hours of flight time. A flight training plane doesn’t have to be new but it does need to be well-maintained.
  • Student Housing Availability. Take a look at housing facilities at the flight school – if they offer it. Take a look at the off-campus housing market – if they don’t. Check the local real estate listings, prices and availability.
  • Flight School Financing. Does the flight school give you a choice of payment plans or do they want all their money up front? It is important for your aviation college to have payment plans and options.

The check list above is in no way complete but it does offer some of the most important key factors to consider in choosing your flight school.

Why Choose Aviator Flight School for your Pilot Training
  • Licensed by the State of Florida Commission For Independent Education License #4155
  • Aviator Flight Training Academy is a Division of Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology, which is licensed by the State of Florida Commission for Independent Education and Accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges.
  • 27 Years in the Flight Training Industry
  • To date, Aviator has trained over 5000 pilots for the commercial airline industry
  • Only School Offering 200 Hours of Multi-Engine Time
  • Aviator is the only flight school that has a full 200 hours of multi-engine time included in our program
  • No Flight Training Devices (Simulators)
  • FTDs are not used towards your flight time for any ratings
  • Approved by the Federal Department of Education to offer Title IV Loans
  • Aviator has the ability to offer students federal funding on approved accredited programs
  • Job Placement Assistance with Regional Airlines
  • Aviator offers job placement assistance for our graduates
  • “A” Rating with United States Better Business Bureau
  • Classroom Environment – All classes taught in our educational center, NOT online

CONTACT AVIATOR
SCHEDULE A VISIT
To speak with an instructor contact the college at 772-672-8222

Distributed by Viestly

Pilot Certifications and Pilot Ratings Explained

Pilot Certifications and Pilot Ratings ExplainedBefore you choose your flight school and enjoy your flight training experience you need to research all pilot licenses and their requirements, including age. FAA’s rules for getting a pilot’s license (certificate) differ depending on the type of aircraft you fly. You should also think about what type of flying you want to do. There are several different types of pilot’s licenses, from student pilot all the way up to Airline Transport Pilot (ATP).

Medical Certification

All pilots are required to be medically certified. To obtain a medical certificate you must be examined by an FAA-designated Aviation Medical Examiner (AME).

Pilot Certification

The basic document that the FAA issues to a pilot is a certificate. The different levels of certification depend upon the extent of training and testing required.

There are a total of 4 types of pilot licenses (certificates):

  1. Student Pilot License (SPL)
  2. Private Pilot License (PPL)
  3. Commercial Pilot License (CPL), and
  4. Airline Transport Pilot License (ATPL)
Student Pilot Certificate

The first level, which is usually issued in connection with the individual’s first aviation medical certificate.

Private Pilot Certification

A Private Pilot License (PPL) is the minimum required for a pilot to take passengers up with him or her. PPL is the most common first step to learning to fly an airplane. The Private Pilot License will allow you to carry passengers in small private airplanes up to 12,500 pounds without restrictions in most cases.
Private Pilot Certificate doesn’t expire and is yours for the rest of you life. There are currency requirements and a flight review requirements every two years but even if you don’t fly for 10 years the license is still yours.

Commercial Pilot Certification

The Commercial Pilot License will allow you to fly for compensation or hire. This means you can get paid to fly. The requirement is at least 250 hours to get this pilot license. Commercial pilot certificates and the airline transport pilot (ATP) certificates certify that the holder has successfully completed those requirements, and is qualified to exercise the more extensive privileges associated with that certificate level.

Airline Transport Pilot License

An Airline Transport Pilot license, or ATP license, is the pinnacle of pilot licenses, requiring extensive skill and knowledge to obtain it. An airline transport pilot is a person who acts as the pilot in command of a commercial aircraft. The airline transport pilot certification is the highest level of certification a pilot can earn, and once the pilot has earned such certification, he or she can operate as the pilot in command of any aircraft that carries cargo or passengers. The pilot is solely responsible for the safety of the aircraft, cargo, and passengers on board.

Instructor Certification

The certificate issued to a flight instructor is considered to be an instructor certificate, and not a pilot certificate. Possession of a commercial or ATP-level pilot certificate is generally required for issuance of a flight instructor certificate and the holder of a flight instructor certificate may exercise its privileges only when the instructor certificate is used in combination with the appropriate pilot certificate. In contrast, the holder of a ground instructor certificate is not required to hold a pilot certificate.

Pilot Ratings

All pilot and instructor certifications (except for student and sport pilot certificates) have associated ratings. Ratings specify what, and/or how, the pilot is qualified to fly. The most common form is the aircraft category and class rating. A typical rating on a private pilot certificate is “airplane single-engine land.” If you subsequently decide that you want to fly twin-engine airplanes, you need to complete the training and testing requirements for a multi-engine rating. Your private pilot certificate will then have ratings for “airplane single and multiengine land.”

There are many possible combinations of certificates and ratings for aircraft category and class. Ratings are added to a certificate when the pilot qualifies for a certain operating privilege, such as an instrument rating, in a specific aircraft category and class.

Pilot ratings are additional qualifications that you can add to an existing Pilot’s license to enhance your abilities as a pilot.

Instrument Rating (IR)

An Instrument Rating (IR) is what’s required to be able to fly an airplane inside and through the clouds, and at times of low visibility. The training involves the pilot to learn how to fly an airplane simply by looking at flight instruments inside the cockpit. If you are on a career path to be an airline pilot then this is a must. IR is a requirement to get a job with an airline, and also to qualify for an Airline Transport Pilot. This is usually obtained after your get your Private Pilot License, and before you get your Commercial Pilot License.

Multi-Engine Rating

Most of your training will be done on single engine airplanes (SE), like Cessna and Piper. However, to qualify for an airline pilot position, you will need to be qualified to fly airplanes with multiple engines. Most airline airplanes have more than one engine. And this training is called Multi-Engine Rating (ME). Most people get their Multi-Engine Rating along with or right after their Commercial Pilot License.(Source)

Endorsements

An endorsement signifies the completion of ground and/or flight training required for specific operating privileges or for airman certification testing. Except for certain endorsements made in pen and ink on a student pilot certificate, endorsements are generally made in the pilot’s logbook. The endorsements required by Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 61 fall into several broad categories:

  • Student Pilots
  • Testing for Certificate or Rating
  • Recurrent Training
  • Aircraft Characteristics
Individual Flight Training Courses

The Aviator Flight Training Academy offers a full line of flight training courses to meet the individual needs of each student. Contact Aviator or Schedule a visit.

Need more Multi-Time?

Check out our Multi Engine Time packages.

Distributed by Viestly

Advantage Of Having Aviation College Degree

Advantage Of Having Aviation College DegreeAbout two-thirds of airline pilots will retire in the coming years and other areas of the aviation industry are also under-supplied with qualified applicants. The FAA is now taking a more serious look at airline pilot flight training. This is forcing the airline industry to take a harder look at candidates for pilot replacements! Professional Pilots must now have first-rate knowledge and continually upgraded skills if they want to hear the word “Hired!” Pilots who train at quality aviation schools and who possess the technical knowledge, first-rate flying skills and a professional attitude will have the hiring edge! Professionalism and knowledge are now prerequisites for entrance into the worldwide airline industry. Fast paced, “fast track” programs, or self-study courses will not meet the new airline industry standards.

Many airlines, especially in the United States, prefer applicants with a college degree. So why not let your flight training build up college credit and earn a degree?

From an employer’s point of view, a degree from a certified aviation science program shows a high level of commitment to the field. Most commercial airlines prefer applicants with college degrees. If you are already a licensed pilot, flight time and certificates can be counted towards your degree, saving both time and money. Entering the aviation job market with a degree in aviation will get you the advantage you need to get a job as a pilot.

Aviation Subjects of Interest
  • Air Traffic Control
  • Aircraft Maintenance
  • Airport Management
  • Aviation Business Administration
  • Maintenance Management
  • Professional Pilot
Aviation Degrees
  1. Associates Degree
  2. Bachelors Degree
  3. Master’s Degree
Aviation Degree

If you look for more then just a certificate then doing your flight training with a college is something to consider. Many colleges throughout the world offer degrees such as bachelor of aviation science or associates of aviation science. Stand alone these degrees do not qualify for any profession without your commercial pilot license (CPL) but make a good starting point if you want to do a masters degree in aviation. Also they look very good on your resume and may be a door opener when applying for a job.

Also already trained pilots can do an aviation degree program with a college. Depending on the college they may credit your flight time and certificates towards a degree. Usually you don’t get full credit (as if you had done the flying with the college), but it may still be a money saver as flying with some colleges are more expensive then the average flight school. However some colleges require you to do at least two or more certificates and/or ratings with them to qualify for a degree.

For already trained pilots some of the classes you have to do are pure repetition as they are meant for pilot students enrolled in the degree program. You still have to take them to get the needed credits to graduate.

An aviation degree is a good, and cost efficient, alternative to doing any other college degree first and then start flying like many students do today. You save time by doing the flight training while you work on a degree. At the same time you save money as the flight training build credit.

Why an Aviation School or Aviation College?

Aviation schools and aviation colleges provide the best learning and training environments for students to succeed and prepare for a career in aviation. You may already be aware of the many benefits of going to college such as better paying jobs, access to a wider range of career choices, and exposure to a wide range of people and cultures. Going to an aviation school or aviation college also has many benefits.

An aviation school or aviation college will allow you to:
  • Gain greater knowledge and expand your skills in a specific aviation career field.
  • Earn an aviation degree, an associate’s degree, and/or bachelor’s degree in an aviation program.
  • Access a wide range of aviation resources and tools to help you with your aviation career.
  • Participate in various aviation internship programs.
  • Increase your chances of networking with aviation employers to gain employment.

Aviation College Degree Programs from Aviator College

Our Aeronautical Science Program includes 565 flight hours and more multi-engine time than any other college or flight school. NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time requirements. Our large multi-engine fleet is equipped with Garmin 430s, and ASPEN EFIS is being introduced.

The Aeronautical Science Program prepares the graduate for a career in the aviation industry by providing a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, aeronautical sciences, aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry. The graduate will receive an Associate of Science Degree, ratings through Flight Instructor Multi-Engine, including the ratings necessary to obtain intermediate level employment. The flight training sequence for this program consists of of four flight-training modules plus additional flight training as specified in each option.

ENROLL NOW FOR SUMMER 2013 CLASSES

CONTACT AVIATOR COLLEGE

Distributed by Viestly

Advantage Of Having Aviation College Degree

Advantage Of Having Aviation College DegreeAbout two-thirds of airline pilots will retire in the coming years and other areas of the aviation industry are also under-supplied with qualified applicants. The FAA is now taking a more serious look at airline pilot flight training. This is forcing the airline industry to take a harder look at candidates for pilot replacements! Professional Pilots must now have first-rate knowledge and continually upgraded skills if they want to hear the word “Hired!” Pilots who train at quality aviation schools and who possess the technical knowledge, first-rate flying skills and a professional attitude will have the hiring edge! Professionalism and knowledge are now prerequisites for entrance into the worldwide airline industry. Fast paced, “fast track” programs, or self-study courses will not meet the new airline industry standards.

Many airlines, especially in the United States, prefer applicants with a college degree. So why not let your flight training build up college credit and earn a degree?

From an employer’s point of view, a degree from a certified aviation science program shows a high level of commitment to the field. Most commercial airlines prefer applicants with college degrees. If you are already a licensed pilot, flight time and certificates can be counted towards your degree, saving both time and money. Entering the aviation job market with a degree in aviation will get you the advantage you need to get a job as a pilot.

Aviation Subjects of Interest
  • Air Traffic Control
  • Aircraft Maintenance
  • Airport Management
  • Aviation Business Administration
  • Maintenance Management
  • Professional Pilot
Aviation Degrees
  1. Associates Degree
  2. Bachelors Degree
  3. Master’s Degree
Aviation Degree

If you look for more then just a certificate then doing your flight training with a college is something to consider. Many colleges throughout the world offer degrees such as bachelor of aviation science or associates of aviation science. Stand alone these degrees do not qualify for any profession without your commercial pilot license (CPL) but make a good starting point if you want to do a masters degree in aviation. Also they look very good on your resume and may be a door opener when applying for a job.

Also already trained pilots can do an aviation degree program with a college. Depending on the college they may credit your flight time and certificates towards a degree. Usually you don’t get full credit (as if you had done the flying with the college), but it may still be a money saver as flying with some colleges are more expensive then the average flight school. However some colleges require you to do at least two or more certificates and/or ratings with them to qualify for a degree.

For already trained pilots some of the classes you have to do are pure repetition as they are meant for pilot students enrolled in the degree program. You still have to take them to get the needed credits to graduate.

An aviation degree is a good, and cost efficient, alternative to doing any other college degree first and then start flying like many students do today. You save time by doing the flight training while you work on a degree. At the same time you save money as the flight training build credit.

Why an Aviation School or Aviation College?

Aviation schools and aviation colleges provide the best learning and training environments for students to succeed and prepare for a career in aviation. You may already be aware of the many benefits of going to college such as better paying jobs, access to a wider range of career choices, and exposure to a wide range of people and cultures. Going to an aviation school or aviation college also has many benefits.

An aviation school or aviation college will allow you to:
  • Gain greater knowledge and expand your skills in a specific aviation career field.
  • Earn an aviation degree, an associate’s degree, and/or bachelor’s degree in an aviation program.
  • Access a wide range of aviation resources and tools to help you with your aviation career.
  • Participate in various aviation internship programs.
  • Increase your chances of networking with aviation employers to gain employment.

Aviation College Degree Programs from Aviator College

Our Aeronautical Science Program includes 565 flight hours and more multi-engine time than any other college or flight school. NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time requirements. Our large multi-engine fleet is equipped with Garmin 430s, and ASPEN EFIS is being introduced.

The Aeronautical Science Program prepares the graduate for a career in the aviation industry by providing a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, aeronautical sciences, aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry. The graduate will receive an Associate of Science Degree, ratings through Flight Instructor Multi-Engine, including the ratings necessary to obtain intermediate level employment. The flight training sequence for this program consists of of four flight-training modules plus additional flight training as specified in each option.

ENROLL NOW FOR SUMMER 2013 CLASSES

CONTACT AVIATOR COLLEGE

Distributed by Viestly

Building Your Flight Training Hours

Building Your Flight Training HoursThe FAA minimum flight time is 40 hours, but the average is around 60. Schools with FAA oversight can be more desirable if you want a highly regimented training program.

Even though there is no ‘one true path’, many pilots will start off in a similar matter. The most common two methods are civilian flight training and the military. Civilian flight training can begin as young as 16 years of age, while military flight training requires a 4-year degree because pilots are required to be commissioned officers. Military pilots will normally gain the hours necessary to fly for an airline or corporation during their time in the service, which makes for a much easier transition into civilian aviation.

People who do civilian flight training, however, can build their hours any number of ways. One of the most common ways is to become an instructor. A certified flight instructor (CFI) can log the hours they spend training prospective pilots, just as the trainees can log the same hours. Once a pilot’s license is earned, pilots will most likely then continue training to earn their instrument rating. Instrument ratings are a requirement to fly as a commercial pilot.
Another way pilots build hours is to tag along with other pilots or to fly cargo, but in my experience and from I’ve learned the best way to build time is to instruct. My best advice is to get your private pilot’s license, then get instrument rated. After you become instrument rated become a certified flight instructor. As a CFI, you will not only accrue much needed hours, but you will be earning money that can be put towards your next goal. I would suggest earning a multi-engine or commercial pilot rating as your next step. After each rating you earn, continue to teach until you have the necessary ratings for your desired career path.

By the time you reach this point you will have the next step of the specific goal that you are aiming for in your sights, as well as a lot of accumulated hours to put on your resume. You will know exactly which path to take next to help you reach your goal.

Planning Your PIC Cross Country Time

By Joe Echo-Hawk. One of the major requirements to complete while you are working on your either your instrument rating or your commercial pilot license is fulfilling your 50 hours of required PIC cross country time. If you are fresh out of your private pilot checkride and are planning on continuing through with your instrument and ultimately commercial license, it could be very well worth your time to plan ahead on how you will complete the required flight time. Let’s take a look at what the requirements are for both the instrument rating and commercial license.

50 hours PIC cross country time required for either the instrument rating or commercial pilot license:

Instrument Rating
  • 1 IFR cross country flight including a distance of atleast 250 nm and 3 different instrument approaches at three different airports.
Commercial Pilot License
  • 1 cross country not less than 300NM total distance with 3 landings at three points, 1 of which is a straight line distance of 250 NM. (solo)
  • Complete a 2 hour, 100 nm straight line distance, dual day cross country. (dual)
  • Complete a 2 hour, 100 nm straight line distance, dual night cross country. (dual)

To meet the above requirements, usually about 13-17 hours of cross country flight time is necessary. I would recommend taking that into consideration early. If you are on a budget and set timeline, meeting those requirements while you are working on accumulating your 50 hours of PIC cross country time will help you out. Most people progress from private into instrument and on to commercial. If you have met your cross country requirements for commercial by the time you finish your instrument rating, (there is nothing say that you can’t) you will be well on your way for your commercial training.

There are many ways to meet your requirements and this may not suit your particular situation, but for many it is an efficient method. Source

Pilot Training Program With Aviator Flight Training Academy 259 Flight Hours

Aviator Flight Training Academy offers professional pilot training programs with a minimum of 200 hours of multi-engine time. The flight school has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator), large classrooms and individual briefing rooms.

Our Professional Pilot Program is set in a flight training, structured environment to ensure the student receives the knowledge that is required to be a professional pilot. This program is from 0 hours to over 250 hours, of which 200 hours will be multi-engine time. The program includes Private Pilot Single Engine through the Multi-Engine Flight Instructor Certificate. Cross Country flying is coast-to-coast, if desired.

When you choose Aviator, all flight training is logged in aircraft. Our Flight Training Devices (FTDs) are used for ground training purposes only. NO FTDs (SIMULATORS) ARE USED FOR FLIGHT TIME TOWARDS YOUR RATINGS!

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Commercial Special

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Achieving Your ATP Pilot License

Achieving Your ATP Pilot LicenseAn Airline Transport Pilot license, or ATP license, is the pinnacle of pilot licenses, requiring extensive skill and knowledge to obtain it.

ATP Eligibility
  • To be eligible for an Airline Transport Pilot certificate, you must know English and:
  • Be at least 23 years of age; AND
  • Be of good moral character.
  • You must already hold one of the following pilot certificates:
  • If US certified: at least a commercial pilot with an instrument rating; OR
  • ICAO country: ATP or commercial pilot with an instrument rating, without limitations, subject to background check.
  • The experience required for an airplane ATP certificate is outlined below.
  • at least 1,500 hours of total time as a pilot
  • 500 hours of CROSS-COUNTRY flight time
  • 100 hours of NIGHT time or 75 hours + 45 full stop landings at night
  • 75 hours of instrument flight time, or 50 flight + 25 simulator

flight time – logged time between engine start and engine shutdown after a flight in an actual airplane
simulator time – logged DUAL instruction in a certified flight simulator or flight training device representing an airplane
cross country – trips of 50 NM and more can be logged and used for ATP experience purposes even without a landing (private pilot and commercial pilot cross-country requires a landing)

An airline transport pilot is a person who acts as the pilot in command of a commercial aircraft. The airline transport pilot certification is the highest level of certification a pilot can earn, and once the pilot has earned such certification, he or she can operate as the pilot in command of any aircraft that carries cargo or passengers. The pilot is solely responsible for the safety of the aircraft, cargo, and passengers on board.

Once fully certified and licensed, the airline transport pilot will be responsible for all operations of the airplane before, during, and immediately after the flight. This means inspecting the plane before the flight, preparing the plane for departure from a gate, preparing the plane for takeoff, operating the plane during flight and addressing any issues that may arise during flight, landing the plane, taxiing the plane to a gate, and shutting down the plane after the flight. The safety of the plane, passengers, and cargo is the primary responsibility of the airline transport pilot.

Flight planning, navigation, communication, and weight balancing may be other responsibilities of the airline transport pilot. If the pilot operates in a specific industry, he or she may also need to meet additional qualifications and take on additional responsibilities as outlined by the airline. If the pilot is a member of the military, he or she will need to complete other training as it pertains to military operations. The costs for obtaining the proper certifications can vary; flight time is perhaps the most expensive cost, since a pilot will need to spend a significant amount of time flying an aircraft before he or she can be considered for the airline transport license.

ATP Privileges
  • With a 1st or 2nd Class Medical, ATPs can exercise all of the privileges of a commercial pilot with an instrument rating.
  • FAA Airline regulations require ATP for captains of IFR passenger flights in turbine and multi-engine airplanes
  • ATPs may instruct pilots in air transportation service in aircraft they are rated and simulators
  • ATPs may endorse pilot logbooks for the training given
Flight Training For ATP

The usual questions of how much it costs and how long it will take are, of course, important considerations for any school on your list. It’s also important to interview past students to learn their thoughts about the training they received, probing for both positive and negative comments. Ask them if they had the chance to do it over again, would they change anything?

Big schools frequently have much broader educational opportunities, an important plus if you plan to acquire an academic degree while completing your flight training. Recognize that attendance at a big school can make you a small fish in a big pond. You’re competing for available job opportunities with many more pilots than at a smaller school. But the larger school may be able to inform you of more job opportunities.

Small schools, on the other hand, often expose students to more types of flying and more diverse job possibilities because they deal with both locally based and transient aircraft in addition to their own training fleet. You will also save money on living expenses if the school is local, and perhaps be able to continue your current employment to keep your income stream alive during your training cycle outflows.

Details of your primary flight training (private through CFI) are of minor interest to major airlines. Instead, they focus on your overall education, total flight time, and the kind of job you currently hold.

Professional Pilot Training

Training for your professional flying career will be an ongoing effort, even after you’re hired. While your primary flight training may not—and need not—differ from any other student’s initial flight training, professional pilots must learn subjects far beyond the initial sport pilot, recreational pilot, or private pilot certificate. It’s not just the difference between visual flight rules (VFR) and instrument flight rules (IFR) operations, either.

Many of these subjects relate to flying as part of a multi-person crew. Coordination of multiple crew members, especially in an emergency situation, can be more challenging than some aspiring professionals expect. At some point in your education, you will receive formal training on the concept and practices of crew resource management. Learning how to work effectively with others is a requirement for your career.

Aviator Flight School Pro Pilot Programs

The programs at Aviator Flight School Academy are designed to provide what the airline industry demands of future commercial pilots. The training you will receive at Aviator is one of the most intensive and challenging programs offered in aviation flight training today.

During your flight training you will fly a total of 259 hours, of which 200 hours will be in a multi-engine aircraft. No flight simulators are used for total flight time. The ground school portion is in a structured classroom environment.

You will receive a minimum of 643 instructional hours for the Professional Pilot Program. 484 instructional hours for the Commercial Pilot Program. The instructional hours includes all ground and flight training. 6 months of housing is included in the program. If you come with a PPL 5 months will be included. Commercial Pilot program includes 4 months of housing, if you come with a PPL 3 months will be included.

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Commercial Pilot Special

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