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Foreign Pilots Wishing To Obtain US Pilot License

Foreign Pilots Wishing To Obtain US Pilot LicensePeople who are not United States citizens are allowed to make 1 training flight in the US, but they must have completed the appropriate paperwork and received TSA approval prior to any subsequent flights. International Students are required to obtain TSA approval prior to receiving flight training for the Private, Instrument, or Multiengine rating. This process may be completed on the TSA website. A visa will be required for training.

FAA Procedure

International students who hold a current foreign license from another country and want to rent an aircraft may apply for a US FAA “Restricted” certificate based on their foreign license. This takes about 90 days for the FAA Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) to contact the foreign country to request verification of the pilot license. The FAA will only issue a Private Pilot Certificate with single engine privileges.

You must apply for and receive a letter from the FAA authorizing you to begin training if you are receiving flight training. This letter is valid for a period of 6 months and a new letter must be issued if the time period will be exceeded. International Students may opt to train for the US Private Certificate (“clean” certificate) to avoid having to base a US certificate on their foreign license. Their logged time, including time received from a foreign instructor, may count towards this rating.

The current TSA approval and FAA letter must be shown to the FAA Inspector or Designated Pilot Examiner before the Practical Exam.

Use the appropriate list at the end of this article to guide you through the process to obtain a US pilot certificate. The checklist is also for those international clients who hold a foreign license and wish to convert it to a US certificate. In this case you must go to the Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) to have your foreign license converted to a US “Restricted” certificate (meaning that it is based on your foreign license). Starting the process 90 days before you travel to the US is very wise and will save you time.

Please log on to http://www.faa.gov to view regulations and other guidance available to you.

Situation #1: This situation applies to those who do not hold a foreign pilot license and have not flown, or have some flight-time that may be used towards their Private certificate.

Check your logbook (if there is one) to determine how much time may be applied towards the Private rating. See FAR Part 61 for requirements.
If you have flight time, you must be able to show that you received training required by our Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) from a certified instructor even if the instructor is not a FAA certified instructor (see FAR §61.41). The regulations are not specific concerning foreign instructors except that they state in paragraph (b) “A flight instructor described in paragraph (a) of this section is only authorized to give endorsements to show training given.”
Apparently, some countries (such as England) do not require the instructor to sign the students’ log. In this case, you must obtain a written statement from the instructor indicating that they provided the training in the log for that particular rating. Each dual entry may be signed or an overall statement, as described previously, will suffice.
Determine how your name will be used by the FAA. You may not use more than 4 names, which is the maximum allowed to be placed on a US certificate.

Situation #2 : If you hold a foreign pilot license and wish to receive a US Restricted certificate based on your foreign license refer to FAR §61.75

Apply for the “Restricted” certificate by logging on http://www.faa.gov, select “Licenses and Certificates” on the left side under “Certificates”, select “Verify the Authenticity of a Foreign License, Rating, or Medical Certification” and follow the instructions.

The FAA will only convert a foreign license to a “Restricted” Private Pilot Certificate. (Note: the FAA will no longer convert to commercial or higher). “Restricted” means that the US certificate is based on your foreign license, which must be both valid and current.

The foreign certificate must not be under an order of revocation or suspension by the foreign country that issued the foreign pilot license; and does not contain an endorsement stating that the applicant has not met all of the standards of ICAO for that license and does not currently hold a U.S. pilot certificate. (FAR §61.75 (b)).

You must hold a current medical from your country or a current US issued medical.
You must apply for the restricted certificate at least 90 days prior. The FAA will only issue you a Private Pilot Certificate.
A Knowledge test is required to convert a foreign instrument rating. This test focuses on FAR §91 subpart B areas of knowledge that apply to IFR procedures and the National Airspace system.

Note that FAA testing centers, such as CATS, require the name to come from your passport or birth certificate and this may be different than the name the FAA places on your restricted certificate. This causes major problems with the certification process. Do not take the knowledge test without first asking the FSDO to help you determine which name to use.

If you hold a foreign pilot license:

Apply for the FAA Verification of Authenticity Letter. The letter format may be found on http://www.faa.gov.
The FAA verifies your foreign license with the issuing country. This must be done before you begin training and is valid for 6 months.
On line 11 enter the FSDO location such as “Boston” as the Flight Standards District Office (FSDO). The address of your nearest FSDO may also be found on http://www.faa.gov.
Begin training when all the paperwork is complete and authorization from the appropriate agencies (TSA, FAA) has been received.

If you do not hold a foreign license and want to qualify for the Private Pilot you must:
  1. Fill out and submit TSA and VISA applications:
  2. E-mail a scanned copy of the following to TSA:
  3.  * Passport
  4.  * Birth Certificate
  5. Foreign Driver’s License

NOTE: *asterisk items are required in order to establish correct name and which names to use on FAA certificates. You can then train for and, when eligible, take the Private Pilot Practical test. Upon successful completion of this test, you will be issued a “Clean” US certificate and don’t need to do anything else unless you want the US certificate recognized by your country. Then you must contact your country’s civil aeronautics authorities. Source

Foreign Language Requirement:

Regardless of your pilot license and case, all pilots must be able to read, speak understand and write the English language. As mandated by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) in accordance with ICAO English Language Proficiency Requirements, all pilots and air traffic personnel are now required to demonstrate English Proficency according to a minimum of Operational Level 4 (four) standards.

Aviation English & Testing at Aviator Flight Training Academy

The mission of the Aviation English Department is to provide International Aviation students and professionals with quality Aviation English instruction using a highly relevant, experiential curriculum at appropriate levels for both ESL students and instructors-in-training. We are committed to delivering the highest possible standards of instruction through the efforts of experienced and well-skilled instructors and strongly emphasize Aviation-specific real world communication skills.

As part of Aviator College, Expedite Aviation English is uniquely positioned to assist international students in achieving their ICAO English proficiency goals and realizing their career goals. We are dedicated to fostering an international perspective throughout Aviator College as well as a global perspective of professionalism throughout the Aviation industry.

International students that are enrolling in one of our pilot programs and wish to increase their English to a level 4 (four) or higher, may enroll at our Aviation English Course at the same time. Research shows that students can quickly earn their ICAO level 4 (four) certificate in as little as one month, which could also reduce your cost in flight training. The course will consist of one month of training by highly experienced English Instructors and easy-to-follow curriculum. The curriculum consists of small classroom group studies, one-on-one instruction, data base and E-Mailing criteria.

International Flight Training Programs At Aviator Flight Training Academy


Commercial Airline Pilot Program
M-1 Visa

The Commercial Airline Pilot Program is for the international student that needs to possess an FAA multi-engine commercial certificate. The program could take as little as 4 months to complete. Shared housing is included for the duration of 4 months. In the program you will earn the private pilot, instrument, single engine commercial and multi-engine commercial. The program is an approved FAA part 141 program which most countries are requiring. Upon your graduation in this program you will receive a Part 141 Commercial Graduation Certificate.
Additional single or multi engine hours can be accumulated at reduced prices. for further information contact our admissions department by email or phone +1-772-466-4822.

Subtract -$6,100.00 if you hold a Private Pilot Certificate

Commercial Pilot Program with Flight Instructor Ratings
F-1 Visa

The Commercial Pilot Program with the addition of 3 flight instructor certificates is a Part 141 and Part 61 Program. The program is designed for the international student coming from countries requiring additional hours for employment in their country. Typically these countries require up to 1500 and to hold an FAA ATP(Airline Transport Pilot) certificate. The program can completed in as little as 6 months. Shared housing is included for the duration of the 6 months. After you have earned all required certificates, you then can be placed in the Part 141 standardization and CPT internship ( 510 hours ).Upon completion of the CPT internship you will then be able to apply for an instructor position for up to 12 months.

To be able to apply for OPT ( Flight instructor Position) you must have completed the program on time with no more than 1 checkride failure. Written exam grades must be at least 85% or higher and you must pass a flight instructor review board.

Subtract -$6,100.00 if you hold a Private Pilot Certificate

Commercial Airline Pilot Program
with FAA and EASA Flight Instructor Ratings
F-1 Visa

The Commercial Program with FAA & EASA Flight Flight Training – Our Instructors – Aviator Flight Training College Certificates ( European Pilots). this program meets all the requirements and licenses for FAA and EASA

The program will take approximately 12 to 15 months, Shared housing is included for 12 months. The ATPL ground school is taught on campus which consists of 650 classroom hours.The 14 written exams are held in Orlando, FL.

After you have earned all required certificates, you then can be placed in the Part 141 standardization and CPT internship ( 510 hours ).Upon completion of the CPT internship you will then be able to apply for an instructor position (OPT) for up to 12 months so that you can build experience.

To be able to apply for OPT ( Flight instructor Position) you must have completed the program on time with no more than 1 checkride failure. Written exam grades must be at least 85% or higher and you must pass a flight instructor review board.

Students interested in enrolling need to speak with an admissions officer prior to enrolling.
You can contact or admissions office at 1-772-466-4822.

Subtract -$6,100.00 if you hold a Private Pilot Certificate

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Facilities and Services Offered International Students in US Flight School

Facilities and Services Offered International Students in US Flight SchoolAll non-us citizens interested in flight training in USA must go through an extensive application and registration process to receive approval for training. Transportation Safety Administration (TSA) was established in the United States to provide security in regards to the aviation industry. International students must provide proper documentation and follow a specific registration process in order for proper processing and flight training approval.

Note: No flight training allowed until TSA approval.

For complete information on registration process, visa and TSA application please visit http://www.flightschoolcandidates.gov

Security Awareness Training

The TSA rule requires flight schools and flight instructors to provide security awareness training to employees who have direct contact with a flight school student (regardless of citizenship or nationality) and to issue and maintain records of this training. This rule applies to ground instructors, administrative personnel, and current and active flight instructors. Whether providing flight training to U.S. citizens or aliens, all active flight instructors must complete the TSA initial security awareness training prior to giving flight or ground instruction. Source

Aviator Application for Training with a Training Provider in the US

Log on to the TSA web site and enter your User ID and temporary Password. The system will help you to create your own password (easier to remember for future access). Your personal control panel will then appear. Proceed to the personal information folder on the upper left window and click on it. The system will take you through a 9-step process for your application. Be ready to provide information such as:

  • Personal Information (i.e. First, Middle, Last Name, Date of Birth, Place of Birth, Citizenship)
  • Passport Information (i.e. Passport number, Visa Number, I-20 or SEVIS number if available)
  • Pilot certificate information (if available)
  • Training Provider State: Florida
  • Training Provider: Ari Ben Aviator, Inc

It is not necessary to provide your Student Number, this is an optional field

List the following courses you will taking at the Aviator. You do not need to register for other courses, However you will need to submit 3 seperate training requests for the following Courses.

  1. Course 01 Private Pilot Single Engine / Aircraft Cessna 172 and Piper PA-28 $130.00
  2. Course 02 Multi Engine Rating / Aircraft Beechcraft BE-76 $130.00
  3. Course 03 Instrument Rating /Aircraft Beechcraft BE-76 $130.00

You will use Category 3
Provide copies of your passport and pilot certificate via fax or scan to the TSA (the system will provide contact information)
Residency and employment information for the last five years
Training provider information (Select Ari Ben Aviator, Inc.)
Course information and duration of training

Return to your TSA home page and scroll down to the bottom portion of the page. You will see a table showing the current status of your application.

Finding Flight Training Provider

Where you train geographically matters. As a student you should look for a flight school that is located in a place that has predominately sunny skies and low winds. Adverse weather is a major cause of grounded flights for flight training. Grounded flights will reduce your frequency of flight training and could cause you to re-train on specific maneuvers because lack of consistent practice. Additionally, it will increase the training footprint and prolong getting to a career at the airlines.

The airport on which the flight school or academy trains is also important. If you are looking to fly for a career it is helpful to train at an airport with a Control Tower and published precision approaches. You will encounter each of these on a daily basis in the airlines, so becoming familiar with them starting day one will help you down the road.
Facilities can make your time in training more enjoyable. Does the school have housing available? Do they have study rooms and computer labs? Do they have transportation from housing to the airport?

Safety is a high priority everywhere in aviation. Look for a flight school that has a dedicated team of mechanics and technicians to maintain the aircraft. Academy training fleets are flown hard and need to be properly maintained to ensure safety. Ask if the academy or school has ever won the FAA’s prestigious Diamond Award for excellence in maintenance proficiency.

International Student Services Department at Aviator College

The International Student Services Department at Aviator College provides guidance to international students. Staff members assist students in interpreting U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) regulations. Services include assisting visa holders with travel signatures, new I-20’s, social security and visa extensions, international student orientation, as well as other immigration matters.

The Aviator College of Aeronautical Science accepts aspiring International Students who wish to complete an Associate of Science Degree in Aeronautical Science.

The Aviator Flight Training Academy accepts International Students who wish to complete a certificate program /flight-training-programs/international-flight-training-program.aspx or earn specific licenses. The Degree Program will take up to a 24 months for completion. Students complete five consecutive semesters. The last two semesters contain an internship component. Interns are required to instruct a minimum of 153 hours each of the two semesters along with completing the General Education Requirements. Transfer Credit may be given for the General Education requirements and previous flight training completed. Send transcripts and copies of any current flight licenses to the Registrars Office for determination.

International Student Housing

Students entering Aviator College and European Flight Training, under an M-1 Student Visa must reside in the housing that is provided to them by the school for the duration of their program.

Students entering Aviator College or European Flight Training under an F-1 Student Visa must reside in the housing that is provided to them by the school for the duration of their ratings. Once all instructor ratings are complete, the student may choose to leave the school accommodation while they are in their internship.

Students wishing to bring family over during their program, the family must be on the appropriate M-2 or F-2 Visa if the student wishes to request to move out of school – approved housing. If any students have any special disabilities or medical conditions that require monitoring or special conditions they must have a letter from their doctor in order to request to move out of school approved housing.

Aviator College International Students enrollment Instructions

Student Tips For Choosing Your Flight School

Student Tips For Choosing Your Flight SchoolThere are a lot of factors to consider before you chose a flight school to begin your flight training. Once thing is for certain and no research is needed to confirm it-it is expensive! So as pilot, you need to invest your money wisely. Do not base your decision solely on advertisement flight schools post. Visit the school, talk to attending students, speak with flight instructors, inquire about their flight training program.

Type of Flight School

Flight schools come in two flavors, Part 61 and Part 141, which refer to the parts of the federal aviation regulations (FARs) under which they operate. The most common and least important distinction between them is the minimum flight time required for the private pilot certificate (sometimes called a pilot license)—40 hours under Part 61, and 35 hours under Part 141.

Considering that the national average for earning a private pilot certificate is 60-75 hours (how long you’ll take will depend on your ability and flying frequency), this difference isn’t important for initial pilot training. It does make a difference to commercial pilot applicants: Part 61 requires 250 hours, and Part 141 requires 190.
What differentiates the two is structure and accountability. Part 141 schools are periodically audited by the FAA and must have detailed, FAA-approved course outlines and meet student pilot performance rates. Part 61 schools don’t have the same paperwork and accountability requirements.

Learning under Part 61 rules can often give students the flexibility to rearrange flying lesson content and sequence to meet their needs, which can be of benefit to part-time students. Many Part 141 flight schools also train students under Part 61 rules.

Which type of flight school is best for you depends on your needs, available time, and other factors, such as veteran’s benefit eligibility (only Part 141 schools can qualify for VA-reimbursed training) and location. When it comes to the FAA checkride, which is the same for all, it doesn’t matter where you learned to fly, only how well—including your understanding of aviation academic material.

Accredited Flight School and Colleges

Although flight schools fall into two basic categories, Part 61 or Part 141, there is a third category that bears serious consideration by prospective pilots, particularly those planning a professional piloting career: nationally accredited pilot training institutions. Accredited flight schools must meet rigid standards of accountability for virtually every area of operation and must apply to an accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.
Aviation college degree programs also play a large part in today’s pilot training marketplace. If you are planning a professional flying career, an aviation degree may make you more competitive. A plus in seeking a degree is that in many cases you are eligible for financial aid and scholarships that will assist you, not only in your academic endeavors, but in flight training as well.

Flight School Check List

Pilots have a check list. A manual with instructions they follow all the time. So you should have a list too. Don’t base your decision on the literature you will collect from a flight school you are considering. You’re looking for informative substance, and this can be found as well in photocopied sheets as it can in full-color catalogs. While scrutinizing the material, take notes for use during the flight school visit, when you’ll check the veracity of its claims. Some things to look for:

  1. The school’s philosophy, goals, and objectives, and how they match your needs.
  2. Are there such benefits as housing, financial aid, and additional pilot training, such as aerobatics, that will broaden your experience?
  3. How important is flight training to the organization?
  4. How long has the flight school been in business?
  5. What about the school’s instructional staff, its enrollment numbers, and credentials?
  6. How many and what types of aircraft are used in the school’s flight instruction program?
  7. What are the school’s classrooms like?
  8. What services are available at its airport (instrument approaches and control towers)?
  9. What is the school’s reputation on flight regulations and safety policies?

Type of Flight Training Programs Offered

Have your questions ready when you are visiting flight schools of your choice. Before your meeting with flight instructors go around school and talk to pilot students enrolled in this flight school. Inquire about their experience.

Integrated vs. Modular pilot training

There are mainly two kind of pilot training, the integrated pilot training. It is kind of a full package to become an airline pilot as from little or no experience. Everything will be organized by the flight school. It is a full time pilot training (15 – 18 months) and it can be very intensive for some of the trainees. The main advantage is that you can focus on learning since everything is organized for you. The disadvantages are the price (more expensive) and working on top of that integrated pilot training is impossible. From my personal experience, the airlines prefer integrated trained pilots since I noticed that they found pilot jobs more easily than modular trained pilots.

Next is the modular pilot training, less expensive, longer (18 months +) and more demanding since you have to organize your modules one after each others. On top of that you will be in charge to book your aircraft, the instructors and also to apply for the exams. If you choose the modular training you really need to be organized! You will therefore lose some time to focus on your pilot training. The advantage of that modular pilot training is that you can be working at the same time. You are at the controls, you manage your time based on your professional and private activities.

Integrated Pilot Training:
  • More expensive
  • approx. 15-18 months
  • Full time training
  • Very intensive
  • Everything organized for you
  • Preferred by the airlines
  • Impossible to work at the same time
Modular Pilot Training:
  • Less expensive
  • 18 months +
  • based on your free time
  • You are in charge of the organization
  • Very demanding regarding organization
  • Possible to work at the same time

Note: Flight schools do not always provides modular and integrated pilot training. Some might only be providing modular pilot training. source

Flight School Question List for Interview

Sample of questions you might consider asking are:

How many flight instructors do you have and how many are full time vs. part time?

This is important because it will determine how available the instructors are. If most of the instructors are part-time, it means they have a full time job that will sometimes take precedence over your flight training. If your flight instructor is a part-timer, make sure your schedules mesh.

How many airplanes do you have available for flight training?

This is important because of availability. If there are only 1 or 2 airplanes available, you may not be able to schedule it when it’s most convenient for you. Having 3 or more airplanes available will increase the chances of you scheduling at your convenience.

How are your airplanes maintained?

There’s nothing more frustrating than showing up for a flight and then having to cancel due to a maintenance issue. Flight schools that have their own maintenance facility are good about keeping their airplanes in airworthy condition.

Which syllabus do you use for pilot training? Can I see a copy of it?

Schools that don’t follow a specific syllabus leave the training completely up to the instructor. In this case, find out which instructors are good about requiring their students to buy and follow a syllabus – because not all instructors do this.

Do you offer ground school classes? If not, how is ground school handled?

Most of the learning you will do will be on the ground. The flying is for practicing maneuvers and to develop your muscle memory. Since many instructors are interested in building up flight time, they will leave most of the ground school up to you. The ideal setup is a school that offers their own ground school. If you can’t find one, invest in a good home-study program available online or in pilot stores.

Do you have a chief flight instructor? Can I talk to him/her?

Having a chief flight instructor is a great sign because this means that the school takes flight training very seriously. Schools without a chief flight instructor usually have an ad hoc assortment of flight instructors, each doing their own thing. If you end up in a school without a chief flight instructor, the next step will be crucial.

Choose a Flight Instructor

Choosing a Flight Instructor is key when learning to fly. Try to look for an flight instructor that is not just trying to build up flight time or one who has been instructing for a few years. Make sure you are comfortable with him/her and make sure they follow a syllabus.

Finally, schedule a demostration flight, preferably with the flight instructor that you would be training with. This accomplishes a couple of things. First, it will give you an idea of what flying is like. Second, it will give you a chance to get the feel for your instructor and how comfortable you are with him/her.

Why choosing the right flight school and flight instructor is important

Most will agree that choosing the right flight school is a very important decision, but they won’t tell you why. This leaves people with a lack of understanding as to just how important this decision is. If you make the wrong decision, it could cost you thousands of dollars, waste time, and will possibly end up in you quitting and never achieving your dream of flying.

The reason people get frustrated and quit flying is that when they show up at a flight school, they have no idea what to expect or they have expectations that are completely off the mark with what actually happens.
If you want to fly as a hobby, you have to keep in mind that your certified flight instructor (CFI) is probably there to build up enough flight time to move into his/her next flying job, which is probably a regional airline job or small cargo company flying job.

This poor individual is getting paid a little over minimum wage and because they are interested in flying as a career, they take it very seriously and expect you to take it just as seriously. They will try to teach you to fly like an airline pilot, which is a little bit different than the type of flying you want to do. Flight instructors that have just graduated from a professional pilot program at a university are especially prone to want to teach you to fly like an airline pilot, when in fact, you have no interest in that type of flying.

Airline flying is very standardized since airline pilots need to do things the same way every time. A captain at an airline may fly with a co-pilot that he/she has never met before and will never meet again. Therefore, it’s crucial that all airline pilots are taught the same standardized procedures for operating the airplane.
You need to find a flight school with an instructor that will work with your way of learning and not treat you like an airline pilot wannabe. Try to determine your own learning style and your instructor’s teaching style as well as his/her motivation for flight instructing. Try to choose a CFI that likes to instruct because they enjoy teaching rather than someone who is there trying to build up flight time.

Source

Contact Aviator Flight School
Schedule a Visit

Institutions Authorized to Certify its Graduates for an Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) Certificate with Reduced Aeronautical Experience

Institutions Authorized to Certify its Graduates for an Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) Certificate with Reduced Aeronautical ExperienceThe Airline Transport Pilot License (ATPL), or in the United States of America, an Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) certificate is the highest level of aircraft pilot license. Those certified as Airline Transport Pilots (unconditional) are authorized to act as pilot in command on scheduled air carrier’s aircraft under CFR 14 Part 121.

Basic Requirements for ATP

Here are just a few of the basics requirements for the ATP License.

  • You must be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English Language
  • You must be able to obtain a 1st class medical certificate
  • You must be 23 years of age
  • You must hold at least a commercial pilot license with instrument rating
  • You must have 1500 hours total flying time
  • You must have 500 cross country flight time
  • You must have 75 hour of actual or simulated instrument flight time
  • You must pass the FAA ATP written exam
  • You must pass the ATP Oral and Practical Exam
Flight Training for ATP

The flight training for you ATP will be nothing new in terms of maneuvers or procedures. The check ride will consist of maneuvers and procedures you have already seen on you instrument, commercial and multi-engine check rides. The only difference is the standards you are expected to fly to. The tolerances are much tighter because at this point you are a professional pilot with a considerable amount of flight time and you are expect to be able to fly like it.
Training primarily focuses on polishing up your instrument flying skills it the multi-engine aircraft you will use for the check ride. If you do the training on your own it can be as little as 5-7 hours of prep. If you work for a large 135 outfit or 121 air-carrier its usually part of a FAA approved upgrade or transition training program.

The FAA Written

The written test for the ATP like all other licenses and ratings is an 80 question computerized test. The questions consist primarily of part 135 and 121 regulations, hazardous materials, high altitude and high-speed aerodynamics, and transport category operating and Performance Data.

The FAA Oral Exam

Again like the written the test the oral examination is taken to a highest level in your aviation career. With the examiner focusing on the regulations appropriate to your type operation, ie 121 or 135. Also included is an in-depth discussion of the test aircrafts various systems. This especially holds true if a company check airman is administering your check ride.

The FAA Practical Exam

Hopefully by the time you pass the written and oral for the ATP the flight should be a breeze. The flight depending on your operation will be conducted in a multi-engine aircraft or flight simulator. The flight test is comprised mostly instrument procedures both multi and single engine. Other abnormal procedures may also be thrown in the mix with the simulator allowing fore more flexibility than a check ride in the aircraft. Like every other check ride aside from your instrument you will also have to demonstrate maneuvers such as stalls and steep turns.

Costs

The costs for the ATP license are quite variable. If you choose to get the ATP on your own you have to budget for about 5-10 hours of flight time in some sort of multi engine aircraft. Some FBO’s and flight school offer a package deal for obtaining your ATP, it usually includes a written test prep and the required flight time to get you up to speed in their aircraft. If you’re lucky to work for a 135 or 121 outfit then the cost to you is nothing financially, the only investment is the time and energy in preparing for your check ride. For those of you looking to do it on your own check out our members only area for links to cheap flight time. Our flight time finder will be coming soon. Source

New ATP Rule

Congress has mandated changes to the requirement to fly as a co-pilot (first officer/second-in-command) in Part 121 airline operations. Currently, a commercially certificated pilot with 250 total hours could serve as a co-pilot. However, in response to the congressional mandate, the FAA has created new certification and qualification requirements for pilots in air carrier operations that took effect in August 2013. As a result of this action, a second in command (first officer) in domestic, flag, and supplemental operations must now hold an airline transport pilot certificate (ATP) and an airplane type rating for the aircraft to be flown.

An ATP certificate requires that a pilot be 23 years of age and have 1,500 hours total time as a pilot. Pilots with fewer than 1,500 flight hours may qualify for a restricted privileges airline transport pilot certificate (R-ATP) beginning at 21 years of age, if they are 1) a military-trained pilot, 2) have a bachelor’s degree with an aviation major, or 3) have an associate’s degree with an aviation major. The alternative total flight hour requirements for an R (restricted) -ATP certificate with airplane category multiengine class rating are:

  • 750 hours for a military pilot who has graduated from a flight training program in the Armed Forces;
  • 1,000 hours for a graduate who holds a bachelor’s degree with an aviation major (60+ aviation semester credits) from an institution of higher education who also receives a commercial certificate and instrument rating from an associated part 141 pilot school;
  • 1,250 hours for a graduate who holds a bachelor’s or an associate’s degree with an aviation major (30+ aviation semester credits) from an institution of higher education who also receives a commercial certificate and instrument rating from an associated part 141 pilot school;

Additionally, to receive an airline transport pilot certificate with a multiengine class rating a pilot must have 50 hours of multiengine flight experience and must have completed a new FAA-approved Airline Transport Pilot Certification Training Program. This new training program will include academic coursework and training in a flight simulation training device. These requirements will ensure that a pilot has the proper qualifications, training, and experience before entering an air carrier environment as a pilot flightcrew member. Source

Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) Certificate with Reduced Aeronautical Experience

Graduates of an institution of higher education that have received Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) authorization to certify graduates may be eligible to apply for a restricted privileges airline transport pilot (ATP) certificate. The total flight time requirements for a restricted privileges ATP Certificate based on a degree with an aviation major are found in § 61.160

  • 1,000 hours for a graduate who holds a bachelor’s degree with an aviation major and meets the remaining requirements of § 61.160(b)
  • 1,250 hours for a graduate who holds an associate’s degree with an aviation major and meets the remaining requirements of § 61.160(c)
  • 1,250 hours for a graduate who holds a bachelor’s degree with an aviation major and meets the remaining requirements of § 61.160(d)

NOTE: To show up in FAA list, an institution of higher education is issued its Letter of Authorization (LOA).
To view the list visit FAA

Aviator College is listed among Institutions Authorized to Certify its Graduates for an Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) Certificate with Reduced Aeronautical Experience
Aviator College Degree Program

Approved by the FAA for a Restricted ATP Certificate at 1250 hours

2 year Associates Degree Program
The Aeronautical Science Program prepares the graduate for a career in the aviation industry by providing a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, aeronautical sciences, aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry. The graduate will receive an Associate of Science Degree from Aviator College with flight ratings from private pilot through commercial, with Flight Instructor ratings. This training is necessary to obtain employment, and by completing the associate’s degree you will set yourself apart from other applicants since a degree is preferred in the airline industry.

The flight portion of the program consists of a minimum of 565 flight hours and more multi-engine time than any other college or flight school today. Our large multi-engine fleet is equipped with Garmin 430s, and ASPEN EFIS is being introduced. Single engine fleet consists of Piper Warrior III with all glass (EFIS systems). Ground school is taught in a classroom environment.

The school’s14 acre campus encompasses 37,000 sq. ft. Administration & Academic training facility is open from 7 am to 6 pm daily. The Flight Operations building is open 24/7 daily, rain or shine.

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Different Types of Flight Schools and Flight Training Offered in US

Different Types of Flight Schools and Flight Training Offered in USWith a shortage of pilots evident in US, now is a good opportunity for students who ever thought of becoming a pilot.
U.S. airlines are facing what threatens to be their most serious pilot shortage since the 1960s, with higher experience requirements for new hires about to take hold just as the industry braces for a wave of retirements.

Federal mandates that took effect in 2013 require all newly hired pilots to have at least 1,500 hours of prior flight experience—six times the current minimum—raising the cost and time to train new fliers in an era when pay cuts and more-demanding schedules already have made the profession less attractive. Meanwhile, thousands of senior pilots at major airlines soon will start hitting the mandatory retirement age of 65.

Another federal safety rule that effect in early 2014, also will squeeze the supply, by giving pilots more daily rest time. This change is expected to force passenger airlines to increase their pilot ranks by at least 5%. Adding to the problem is a small but steady stream of U.S. pilots moving to overseas carriers, many of which already face an acute shortage of aviators and pay handsomely to land well-trained U.S. captains.

“This is going to come to a crisis,” said Bob Reding, recently retired executive vice president of operations at AMR Corp.’s American Airlines and now a consultant to FlightSafety International Inc., an aviation training provider.

With new strict requirements in flight training time, the decision to become a pilot should not be taken lightly. The career path to become a pilot requires commitment and financial resources to achieve your goal. Flight training is a very serious investment and should not be taken lightly. Do you research to find out which flight school to choose that will best suit your needs.

Choosing Flight School

With over 1,900 flight schools to pick from, you’ll have lots of options. But which one is right for you? It helps if you have an idea of what you want from aviation. Do you want to fly for fun, for business, or as a career?

What is common for most flight schools is that all of them have a chief flight instructor. This is the person in charge of all flight training and can be compared to the principle of an ordinary school. Depending on the size of the flight school this usually is a person with a lot of flight time and instruction time. Quite often they are retired airline pilots or ex-military pilots with a genuine interest in flying and flight training.

His or her job is to look after all the flight training with the school and you are likely to fly with him on stage checks or progression tests. Depending on the size of the school he may have own students.

Under the chief flight instructor you find from one to several assistant chief flight instructors. They are senior instructors with the flight school or have a lot of instruction time. Like the chief flight instructor they perform stage checks or progression tests. Often they are responsible for a certain area of the training, ex. private pilot courses or instrument rating courses. The assistant chief flight instructor(s) may have own students, and quite often teaching other instructor students due to their experience level.

Under the chief and his assistant(s) you find all the flight instructors. They do most of the training at the flight school. Depending on the instructor certificates held he or she will do most of the flight training with you. Many instructors are fresh out of flight school and work as instructors to build flight time. Unfortunately some are not very interested in instructing, so always pay attention to your instructor’s behavior in the beginning and go to your assistant chief flight instructor or chief flight instructor if you experience no progression. Sometimes the problem is the instructor, not you.

Dual Certificate school
These are flight schools offering certificates to more then just their national certificates. Good examples are schools in the United States offering training to both FAA (USA) and JAA (Europe) certificates. These are usually large flight schools and they may be offering it through partnering schools in other countries. Some even have courses leading to both FAA and JAA certificates. This is commonly done by making you an FAA pilot first and build up flight time in the United States (as a flight instructor, small cargo or banner pilot), before you go back to Europe for conversion to JAA. Even though this way usually is a little more expensive it is a good way to build flight time and get dual certificates.
Types of Flight Schools—Part 61 and Part 141 Schools, Flight Time, and Earning a Pilot Certificate
Flight schools come in two flavors, Part 61 and Part 141, which refer to the parts of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) under which they operate. The most common and least important distinction between them is the minimum flight time required for the private pilot certificate (sometimes called a pilot license)—40 hours under Part 61, and 35 hours under Part 141.

Considering that the national average for earning a private pilot certificate is 60-75 hours (how long you’ll take will depend on your ability and flying frequency), this difference isn’t important for initial pilot training. It does make a difference to commercial pilot applicants: Part 61 requires 250 hours, and Part 141 requires 190.

What differentiates the two is structure and accountability. Part 141 flight schools are periodically audited by the FAA and must have detailed, FAA-approved course outlines and meet student pilot performance rates. Part 61 schools don’t have the same paperwork and accountability requirements.

Learning under Part 61 rules can often give students the flexibility to rearrange flying lesson content and sequence to meet their needs, which can be of benefit to part-time students. Many Part 141 schools also train students under Part 61 rules. Source

Ground School, Distant Learning and Online School

In addition to all the flight schools you also have schools only offering the theory part. As there is a lot of reading involved to become a pilot some only offer this part. The benefit is you can get rid of all the written pretty fast and then concentrate on the flying. With distant learning and online schools you can also be anywhere in the world and still do their programs.

Especially pilots brushing up on lost knowledge (there is a lot to keep track of), flight instructors renewing their certificate or pilots converting from one nationality to another use ground, distant learning or online schools.

Also as many part 61 schools do not offer ground school classes and paying an instructor by the hour to teach you may be expensive, doing a class this way may be smart when starting your training.

Make A Summary Flight School Checklist

What flight school you ultimately choose depends on the quality flight training you desire in a method convenient to your schedule. In earning your private pilot certificate, you will have achieved a license to learn. Aviation is an ever-changing activity, and good pilots are always learning.

  • Determine your aviation goals. Are you learning to fly for fun or do you plan to pursue a career?
  • Compile a list of schools to examine, and request literature from each. Review material from each school and answer the questions outlined earlier here.
  • Once you’ve done your homework, visit the final two or three schools that pass the test. Ask questions and get a feel for the personalities of the schools. Ask specific questions and insist on specific answers. Talk to other students and flight instructors.
  • Once you’ve decided on a school, be sure a written agreement outlines the payment procedures.
  • Use online flight school directory to find a flight school near you.
Aviator Flight School in Florida

Location is very important when you are looking for a flight training school. Florida is a great place to earn your wings. The moderate and mild climate makes flight training a pleasure. The good weather allows you to log more flying hours faster, get your degree quicker and be on the way sooner to your new aviation career. Ft. Pierce is a small city with friendly people – without congested traffic on the ground or in the air.

Founded in 1982 Aviator Flight School offered opportunities to students looking to receive training to fulfill the specialized demands of the airline industry. The Aviator Flight School moved from Addison, Texas to its current location at the Fort Pierce, Florida, campus in 1999.The school has continued to grow and evolve. In 2009 Aviator became a college and expanded into the current 77,500 sq. ft. campus.

Since 1982, when the first students signed up for flight training, students at the Aviator Flight School have earned more than 20,000 FAA Licenses. From the beginning, Aviator has been committed to excellence in education. The majority of our graduate pilots are flying professionally in the U.S. and around the world.
Today we operate a fleet of more than 30 aircraft that fly over 30,000 hours yearly. As the Flight School advances and the alumni increase, the college remains focused on developing leaders and professionals in the aviation industry.

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Flight Training Programs for International Students With M1 and F1 Visas

Flight Training Programs for International Students With M1 and F1 VisasGenerally, a citizen of a foreign country who wishes to enter the United States must first obtain a visa, either a nonimmigrant visa for temporary stay, or an immigrant visa for permanent residence. You must have a student visa to study in the United States. Your course of study and the type of school you plan to attend determine whether you need an F-1 visa or an M-1 visa.

The “M” visa is for nonacademic or vocational studies. M-1 visa holders for technical and vocational programs are not permitted to work during the course of their studies. The M-1 student visa applicants must have evidence that sufficient funds are immediately available to pay all tuition and living costs for the entire period of intended stay.

M1 Student Visa Requirements

You cannot enter as an M1 to just study “generally”; your program must have a goal and you must be involved in a “full course of study”. A full course of study means study in a community or junior college, with at least 12 semester or quarter hours. It must be in a school where anyone attending for at least 12 semester or quarter hours is charged full tuition, or considered full-time. The only exception is where you need a smaller course-load to complete your course of study. It can also mean study at a post secondary vocational or business school which grants Associate or other degrees. Alternatively, if a school can demonstrate that its credits are, or have been, accepted unconditionally by at least 3 institutions of higher learning it can qualify. If that is not possible, study in a vocational or nonacademic curriculum, certified by a DSO to require at least 18 hours of weekly attendance or at least 22 clock hours a week (if most of your studies are in a shop or lab). If that is not possible, the last option is study in a vocational or nonacademic high school curriculum which is certified by a DSO to require class attendance for not less than the minimum required for normal progress towards graduation.

F1 Student Visa Requirements

An F1 visa is issued to international students who are attending an academic program or English Language Program at a US college or university. F-1 students must maintain the minimum course load for full-time student status. They can remain in the US up to 60 days beyond the length of time it takes to complete their academic program, unless they have applied and been approved to stay and work for a period of time under the OPT program, as described below. F1 students are expected to complete their studies by the expiration date on their I-20 form (Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant Student Status) which is provided by the US college or university that the student has been accepted to and will attend.

In order to qualify, applicants need to satisfy and prove several strict criteria during an F1 visa interview:

  1. Must have a foreign residence and must intend to return there upon completion of studies;
  2. Can only study at the academic institution through which the visa was granted;
  3. Must have sufficient financial support;
  4. Must have strong ties to home country (e.g. job offer letter upon completion of studies, assets, bank accounts, and family).

An F-1 student is generally entitled up to one year of post-completion optional practical training, or OPT. Authorization for this type of practical training may be granted for a maximum of 12 months and only starts once you have graduated or completed your course of study. Students in STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) can extend their OPT authorization for up to 29 months. Please visit our Working in the USA section for complete information regarding OPT and other permitted employment for F1 students. Source

International Flight Training Programs at Aviator Flight Training Academy
Commercial Airline Pilot Program, M-1 Visa

The Commercial Airline Pilot Program is for the international student that needs to possess an FAA multi-engine commercial certificate. The program could take as little as 4 months to complete. Housing is included for the duration of 4 months. In the program you will earn the private pilot, instrument, single engine commercial and multi-engine commercial. The program is an approved FAA part 141 program which most countries are requiring. Upon your graduation in this program you will receive a Part 141 Commercial Graduation Certificate.
Additional single or multi engine hours can be accumulated at reduced prices. for further information contact our admissions department by email or phone +1-772-466-4822.

NOTE: Subtract -$6,100.00 if you hold a Private Pilot Certificate

Commercial Pilot Program with Flight Instructor Ratings , F-1 Visa

The Commercial Pilot Program with the addition of 3 flight instructor certificates is a Part 141 and Part 61 Program. The program is designed for the international student coming from countries requiring additional hours for employment in their country. Typically these countries require up to 1500 and to hold an FAA ATP(Airline Transport Pilot) certificate. The program can completed in as little as 6 months. Housing is included for the duration of the 6 months. After you have earned all required certificates, you then can be placed in the Part 141 standardization and CPT internship ( 510 hours ).Upon completion of the CPT internship you will then be able to apply for an instructor position for up to 12 months.

To be able to apply for OPT ( Flight instructor Position) you must have completed the program on time with no more than 1 checkride failure. Written exam grades must be at least 85% or higher and you must pass a flight instructor review board.

NOTE: Subtract -$6,100.00 if you hold a Private Pilot Certificate

Commercial Airline Pilot Program with FAA and EASA Flight Instructor Ratings
F-1 Visa

The Commercial Program with FAA & EASA Flight Instructor Certificates ( European Pilots). this program meets all the requirements and licenses for FAA and EASA

The program will take approximately 12 to 15 months, housing is included for 12 months. The ATPL ground school is taught on campus which consists of 650 classroom hours.The 14 written exams are held in Orlando, FL.

After you have earned all required certificates, you then can be placed in the Part 141 standardization and CPT internship ( 510 hours ).Upon completion of the CPT internship you will then be able to apply for an instructor position (OPT) for up to 12 months so that you can build experience.

To be able to apply for OPT ( Flight instructor Position) you must have completed the program on time with no more than 1 checkride failure. Written exam grades must be at least 85% or higher and you must pass a flight instructor review board.

Students interested in enrolling need to speak with an admissions officer prior to enrolling. You can contact or admissions office at 1-772-466-4822.

NOTE: Subtract -$6,100.00 if you hold a Private Pilot Certificate

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International Students Department

Student Pilot License Information Guide

Student Pilot License Information GuideIf you are in the process of becoming a student pilot or already enrolled in flight training program, the information below will guide you in your preparation for an important 1st step in becoming a pilot. Before committing to flight training, pilot students should have a general idea of aviation industry, FAA-its governing and regulating authority, safety regulations, pilot certification process and be abreast of all news pertaining to pilots in general.

Role of the FAA

Congress empowered the FAA to foster aviation safety by prescribing safety standards for civil aviation. This is accomplished through the Code of Federal Regulations (CFRs). Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 61 pertains to the certification of pilots, flight instructors, and ground instructors. This prescribes the eligibility, aeronautical knowledge, flight proficiency, and experience required for each type of pilot certificate issued.

Flight Standards District Offices (FSDOs)

Throughout the world, the FAA has approximately 100 Flight Standards District Offices and International Field Offices, commonly referred to as “FSDOs” and “IFOs.” Through these offices, information and services are provided for the aviation community.

The Student Pilot

The first step in becoming a pilot is to select a type of aircraft. FAA rules for getting a pilot’s certificate differ depending on the type of aircraft flown. Individuals can choose among airplanes, gyroplanes, weight-shift, helicopters, powered parachutes, gliders, balloons, or airships. A pilot does not need a certificate to fly ultralight vehicles.

Basic Requirements

A student pilot is one who is being trained by an instructor pilot for his or her first full certificate, and is permitted to fly alone (solo) under specific, limited circumstances. Upon request, an FAA-authorized aviation medical examiner (AME) will issue a combined medical certificate and Student Pilot Certificate after completion of a physical examination.
Student Pilot Certificates may be issued by an FAA inspector or an FAA-designated pilot examiner. To be eligible for a Student Pilot’s Certificate, an individual must be:

  • Be 16 years old (14 years old to pilot a glider or balloon).
  • Be able to read, write, speak, and understand English.
  • Hold a current Third-Class Medical Certificate (or for glider or balloon, certify no medical defect exists that would prevent piloting a balloon or glider)
Choosing a Flight School

Most airports have facilities for flight training conducted by flight schools or individual flight instructors. A school will usually provide a wide variety of training material, special facilities, and greater flexibility in scheduling.
Many colleges and universities also provide flight training as a part of their curricula. There are two types of flight schools catering to primary general aviation needs. One is normally referred to as a certificated “part 141 school” and the other as a “part 61 school.” A part 141 flight school has been granted an Air Agency Certificate by the FAA. The certificated schools may qualify for a ground school rating and a flight school rating. In addition, the school may be authorized to give their graduates practical (flight) tests and knowledge (computer administered written) tests.

The most common and least important distinction between them is the minimum flight time required for the private pilot certificate (sometimes called a pilot license)—40 hours under Part 61, and 35 hours under Part 141. What differentiates the two is structure and accountability. Part 141 schools are periodically audited by the FAA and must have detailed, FAA-approved course outlines and meet student pilot performance rates. Part 61 schools don’t have the same paperwork and accountability requirements.

Enrollment in a certificated school usually ensures quality and continuity of training. These schools meet prescribed standards with respect to equipment, facilities, personnel, and curricula.
Once the flight school is chosen Ground and flight training should be obtained as regularly and frequently as possible. This assures maximum retention of instruction and the achievement of requisite proficiency.

The Role of the Flight Instructor

The student pilot’s training program depends upon the quality of the ground and flight training received. An instructor should possess an understanding of the learning process, a knowledge of the fundamentals of teaching, and the ability to communicate effectively with the student pilot. During the certification process, a flight instructor applicant is tested on a practical application of these skills in specific teaching situations. The quality of instruction, and the knowledge and skills acquired from your flight instructor will affect your entire flying career whether you plan to pursue it as a vocation or an avocation.

The FAA has adopted an operational training concept that places the full responsibility for student training on the flight instructor. In this role, the flight instructor assumes total responsibility for training you to meet the standards required for certification within an ever-changing operating environment. The flight instructor will provide you guidance, and arrange for your academic and flight training lessons.

It is therefore extremely important to do your research. Get impartial opinions of the flight school and/or flight instructor you intend to employ.

What Flight Training Requires

A course of instruction should include the ground and flight training necessary to acquire the knowledge and skills required to safely and efficiently function as a certificated pilot. Whether you attend a part 141 or part 61 school or obtain the services of an individual flight instructor, the specific knowledge and skill areas for each category and class of aircraft are outlined in Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) mentioned above.

Medical Requirements

Pilots, except those who fly gliders or free air balloons, must possess a valid medical certificate in order to exercise the privileges of their airman certificates. Sport pilots must possess either a valid third-class medical certificate or a valid driver’s license.

The periodic medical examination required for medical certification is conducted by designated aviation medical examiners, who are physicians with a special interest in aviation safety and have training in aviation medicine.
The standards for medical certification are contained in 14 CFR part 67. The requirements for obtaining medical certification are contained in 14 CFR part 61.

Prior to beginning flight training, a flight instructor should interview you about any health conditions and determine your goal as a pilot. Good advice would be to obtain the class of medical certificate required, for the certificate level you ultimately want, before beginning flight training. Finding out immediately whether you are medically qualified could save time and money.

Study Materials For Pilot

The FAA develops and makes available to the public various sources of aeronautical information. Some of this information is free; other information is available at a nominal cost. Of particular interest and value to those persons getting started in flying are: FAA-H-8083-27A, Student Pilot Guide; FAA-H-8083-3, Airplane Flying Handbook; FAA-H-8083-25, Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge; Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM); and Practical Test Standards (PTSs). In addition, many aviation publications are available from commercial sources.

Suggested Study Materials
  • 14 CFR parts 1, 61, 67, and 91
  • Aeronautical Information Manual
  • AC 00-6, Aviation Weather
  • AC 00-45, Aviation Weather Services
  • FAA-H-8083-1, Pilot’s Weight and Balance
  • FAA-H-8083-3, Airplane Flying Handbook
  • FAA-H-8083-11, Balloon Flying Handbook
  • FAA-H-8083-13, Glider Flying Handbook
  • FAA-H-8083-21, Rotorcraft Flying Handbook
  • FAA-H-8083-25, Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge
  • FAA-S-8081-3, Recreational Pilot Practical Test Standards
  • FAA-S-8081-14, Private Pilot Practical Test Standards (Airplane)
  • FAA-S-8081-29, Sport Pilot Practical Test Standards (Airplane,
  • Gyroplane, Glider and Flight Instructor)
  • FAA-S-8081-30, Sport Pilot Practical Test Standards (Airship,
  • Balloon, and Flight Instructor)
  • FAA-S-8081-31, Sport Pilot Practical Test Standards (Weight Shift
  • Control, Powered Parachute, and Flight Instructor)
  • FAA-S-8081-32, Private Pilot Practical Test Standards (Powered
  • Parachute and Weight Shift Control)
  • http://www.faasafety.gov
How to Obtain Study Materials

The current Flight Standards Service airman training and testing material and questions banks for all airman certificates and ratings can be obtained from the Regulatory Support Division’s web site.

When to Take the Knowledge Test

Like any other test, FAA knowledge tests are intended to inspect or access students aeronautical knowledge and skills achieved during training. Experience has shown that the knowledge test is more meaningful to the applicant, and is more likely to result in a satisfactory grade, if it is taken after beginning the flight portion of the training. For optimum benefit, it is recommended that the knowledge test be taken after the student has completed a solo cross-country flight. The operational knowledge gained by this experience can be used to the student’s advantage in the knowledge test. Your instructor will be the best indicator of your preparedness for the test.

Where to Take the Knowledge Test

FAA-Designated Computer Testing Centers have been certificated to administer FAA knowledge tests. Applicants will be charged a fee for the administration of FAA knowledge tests. Test registration numbers and a complete list of test centers can be downloaded from the Regulatory Support Division’s web site. SOURCE -FAA.gov regulations

Pilot Training Program With Aviator Flight Training Academy 259 Flight Hours

Aviator Flight Training Academy offers professional pilot training programs with a minimum of 200 hours of multi-engine time. The flight school has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator), large classrooms and individual briefing rooms.

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