Home > Uncategorized > For Professional Pilots Flight Training Does Not Stop

For Professional Pilots Flight Training Does Not Stop

For Professional Pilots Flight Training Does Not StopTo be a successful professional pilot, you need to have had a good general secondary education, ideally with an emphasis on mathematics and physics. If the latter subjects were not your specialization, you must have an aptitude for them or you will struggle with the academic subjects you need to study to earn a commercial pilot’s license.
A degree is not essential, but it helps, especially if it was in engineering, mathematics or science.

To be a pilot at the professional level, you will need better-than-average hand-eye co-ordination, and a naturally good sense of spatial orientation in three dimensions.

Your health, hearing and eyesight must be first class, and color-blindness would disqualify you. It is advisable to have a full aviation medical health check before doing anything else.

Pilots are generally confident individuals. The profession demands it. Self-assurance is gained through successfully performing at very high levels of competence. When pilots fly a lot, the confidence builds because the skills improve. Pilot profession demands you to stay sharp. When pilots take a lot of time away from flying they lose that sharp edge that took so long to hone.

Flying is a perishable skill that requires constant practice to maintain. Most of today’s airline flying is done connected to an autopilot, so hand-flying skills evaporate quickly.

You might wonder why we don’t hand-fly the plane more to keep our skills sharp. The short answer is that it’s safer to keep autopilot on: Autopilot prevents human error and fatigue. Source

During takeoffs and landings in particular, pilots are engaged in many tasks that must be done simultaneously. Autopilot can manage some tasks and free up the pilots for others. For example, after takeoff, autopilot can assure we’ll level off at each altitude we’re cleared for, allowing us to attend to traffic, an unexpected event or radio chatter.
In good weather, most pilots like to hand-fly the airplane to 18,000 feet. Bad weather is a different story: Hand-flying the airplane can be very fatiguing, and I always feel better when pilots I’m flying with keep fresh through autopilot assistance. However, all this use of autopilot means that we run the risk of getting rusty.

The WINGS – Pilot Proficiency Program

Pilot Proficiency Program is based on the premise that when you maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight you will enjoy a safe and stress-free flying experience. Requirements, which include specific subjects and flight maneuvers from the appropriate Practical Test Standards, are established for airplanes, seaplanes and amphibians, rotorcraft, gliders, lighter-than-air, powered parachutes, weight-shift control, and light sport aircraft. You may select the category and class of aircraft in which you wish to receive training and in which you wish to demonstrate your flight proficiency. All training must place special emphasis on safety of flight operations. Proficiency must be demonstrated to the applicable standard, i.e., Practical Test Standards or Industry Course Completion Standards, etc.

The WINGS – Pilot Proficiency Program The WINGS Program is designed to encourage you to participate in an on-going training program that will provide an opportunity to fly on a regular basis with an authorized flight instructor. With this in mind, three levels have been designed to allow for flexibility in obtaining the level of currency and proficiency you desire. The program is most effective when your training is accomplished regularly throughout the year, thus affording you the opportunity to fly in different seasons and in the different flight conditions you may encounter. You may earn as many phases in a level as you wish.

So here is all the technical information, but remember, this is all tracked here on “My WINGS” for you, so don’t get too worried about which phase or what requirements you must meet just yet.

Basic Level.

This level is designed for those pilots who want to establish a recurrent training program that will provide them a higher level of proficiency than merely preparing for a normal Flight Review as required by 14 CFR 61.56. In addition, because the Basic Level addresses primary accident causal factors, every pilot is required to complete a phase at the Basic Level at least once every 12 calendar months. This ensures pilots are aware of accident causal factors and possible mitigation strategies.

Note that when you earn a phase of WINGS at any Level, you meet the requirements for a Flight Review (reference 61.56(e)).
To earn a phase at the Basic level, you must complete three knowledge credits of instruction and demonstrate proficiency when required as shown in the respective PTS. These knowledge areas are designed to cover current subject matter that the FAASTeam has determined to be critical areas of operation, which in the preceding months have been found to be major causal factors in aircraft accidents.

A pilot must also complete three credits of flight activities. Completion of a credit of flight for this level of flight requires demonstration of proficiency in the Area of Operation(s) required for the credit sought, as stated in the appropriate Practical Test Standards.

This level requires the use of the Practical Test Standard (PTS) for the pilot certificate held or the Private Pilot PTS, whichever is lower, for the category and class of aircraft used.

A current listing of course material, subject matter, FAASTeam seminars, activities, flight requirements, and credit values can be found by going to your “My WINGS” page when you are registered on FAASafety.gov. This list may change periodically, reflecting the dynamic nature of aircraft accident causal factors and FAASTeam emphasis areas.

Advanced Level.

This level is designed for those pilots who want a training program that will take them a step above Basic. It affords you the opportunity, in concert with your instructor, to tailor the training to fit more specific needs.
To complete a phase of WINGS at the Advanced level, you must simultaneously complete or already hold the Basic level as outlined previously.

The Advanced level requires an additional three flight credits and three knowledge credits using the Commercial PTS for the category and class of aircraft used, or the Private PTS when there is not a Commercial PTS, or if completion of the Basic level used the Sport or Recreational PTS, the Private PTS will be used for this level.
A current listing of course material, subject matter, FAASTeam seminars, flight requirements, activities, and credit values can be found by going to your “My WINGS” page when you are registered on FAASafety.gov. This list will change periodically, reflecting the dynamic nature of aircraft accident causal factors and FAASTeam emphasis areas.

Master Level.

This level is designed to give even more flexibility to your needs for specialized training. While most often this level will require the use of higher PTS standards, it will also allow for the addition of specialized equipment and flight environment training scenarios.

To obtain the Master level, you must simultaneously complete or already hold a phase at the Advanced level as outlined previously.

The Master level requires an additional three flight credits and three knowledge credits using the Commercial or ATP PTS for the category and class of aircraft used and the Instrument Rating PTS, if one is available for the category and class of aircraft used. A Light Sport Aircraft (LSA) may not be used at this level. source

Flight School Pro Pilot Program

The programs at Aviator Flight School are designed to provide what the airline industry demands of future commercial pilots. The training you will receive at Aviator is one of the most intensive and challenging programs offered in aviation flight training today.

Schedule a visit
Contact Aviator

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: