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Posts Tagged ‘CPL’

Foreign Pilots Wishing To Obtain US Pilot License

Foreign Pilots Wishing To Obtain US Pilot LicensePeople who are not United States citizens are allowed to make 1 training flight in the US, but they must have completed the appropriate paperwork and received TSA approval prior to any subsequent flights. International Students are required to obtain TSA approval prior to receiving flight training for the Private, Instrument, or Multiengine rating. This process may be completed on the TSA website. A visa will be required for training.

FAA Procedure

International students who hold a current foreign license from another country and want to rent an aircraft may apply for a US FAA “Restricted” certificate based on their foreign license. This takes about 90 days for the FAA Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) to contact the foreign country to request verification of the pilot license. The FAA will only issue a Private Pilot Certificate with single engine privileges.

You must apply for and receive a letter from the FAA authorizing you to begin training if you are receiving flight training. This letter is valid for a period of 6 months and a new letter must be issued if the time period will be exceeded. International Students may opt to train for the US Private Certificate (“clean” certificate) to avoid having to base a US certificate on their foreign license. Their logged time, including time received from a foreign instructor, may count towards this rating.

The current TSA approval and FAA letter must be shown to the FAA Inspector or Designated Pilot Examiner before the Practical Exam.

Use the appropriate list at the end of this article to guide you through the process to obtain a US pilot certificate. The checklist is also for those international clients who hold a foreign license and wish to convert it to a US certificate. In this case you must go to the Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) to have your foreign license converted to a US “Restricted” certificate (meaning that it is based on your foreign license). Starting the process 90 days before you travel to the US is very wise and will save you time.

Please log on to http://www.faa.gov to view regulations and other guidance available to you.

Situation #1: This situation applies to those who do not hold a foreign pilot license and have not flown, or have some flight-time that may be used towards their Private certificate.

Check your logbook (if there is one) to determine how much time may be applied towards the Private rating. See FAR Part 61 for requirements.
If you have flight time, you must be able to show that you received training required by our Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) from a certified instructor even if the instructor is not a FAA certified instructor (see FAR §61.41). The regulations are not specific concerning foreign instructors except that they state in paragraph (b) “A flight instructor described in paragraph (a) of this section is only authorized to give endorsements to show training given.”
Apparently, some countries (such as England) do not require the instructor to sign the students’ log. In this case, you must obtain a written statement from the instructor indicating that they provided the training in the log for that particular rating. Each dual entry may be signed or an overall statement, as described previously, will suffice.
Determine how your name will be used by the FAA. You may not use more than 4 names, which is the maximum allowed to be placed on a US certificate.

Situation #2 : If you hold a foreign pilot license and wish to receive a US Restricted certificate based on your foreign license refer to FAR §61.75

Apply for the “Restricted” certificate by logging on http://www.faa.gov, select “Licenses and Certificates” on the left side under “Certificates”, select “Verify the Authenticity of a Foreign License, Rating, or Medical Certification” and follow the instructions.

The FAA will only convert a foreign license to a “Restricted” Private Pilot Certificate. (Note: the FAA will no longer convert to commercial or higher). “Restricted” means that the US certificate is based on your foreign license, which must be both valid and current.

The foreign certificate must not be under an order of revocation or suspension by the foreign country that issued the foreign pilot license; and does not contain an endorsement stating that the applicant has not met all of the standards of ICAO for that license and does not currently hold a U.S. pilot certificate. (FAR §61.75 (b)).

You must hold a current medical from your country or a current US issued medical.
You must apply for the restricted certificate at least 90 days prior. The FAA will only issue you a Private Pilot Certificate.
A Knowledge test is required to convert a foreign instrument rating. This test focuses on FAR §91 subpart B areas of knowledge that apply to IFR procedures and the National Airspace system.

Note that FAA testing centers, such as CATS, require the name to come from your passport or birth certificate and this may be different than the name the FAA places on your restricted certificate. This causes major problems with the certification process. Do not take the knowledge test without first asking the FSDO to help you determine which name to use.

If you hold a foreign pilot license:

Apply for the FAA Verification of Authenticity Letter. The letter format may be found on http://www.faa.gov.
The FAA verifies your foreign license with the issuing country. This must be done before you begin training and is valid for 6 months.
On line 11 enter the FSDO location such as “Boston” as the Flight Standards District Office (FSDO). The address of your nearest FSDO may also be found on http://www.faa.gov.
Begin training when all the paperwork is complete and authorization from the appropriate agencies (TSA, FAA) has been received.

If you do not hold a foreign license and want to qualify for the Private Pilot you must:
  1. Fill out and submit TSA and VISA applications:
  2. E-mail a scanned copy of the following to TSA:
  3.  * Passport
  4.  * Birth Certificate
  5. Foreign Driver’s License

NOTE: *asterisk items are required in order to establish correct name and which names to use on FAA certificates. You can then train for and, when eligible, take the Private Pilot Practical test. Upon successful completion of this test, you will be issued a “Clean” US certificate and don’t need to do anything else unless you want the US certificate recognized by your country. Then you must contact your country’s civil aeronautics authorities. Source

Foreign Language Requirement:

Regardless of your pilot license and case, all pilots must be able to read, speak understand and write the English language. As mandated by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) in accordance with ICAO English Language Proficiency Requirements, all pilots and air traffic personnel are now required to demonstrate English Proficency according to a minimum of Operational Level 4 (four) standards.

Aviation English & Testing at Aviator Flight Training Academy

The mission of the Aviation English Department is to provide International Aviation students and professionals with quality Aviation English instruction using a highly relevant, experiential curriculum at appropriate levels for both ESL students and instructors-in-training. We are committed to delivering the highest possible standards of instruction through the efforts of experienced and well-skilled instructors and strongly emphasize Aviation-specific real world communication skills.

As part of Aviator College, Expedite Aviation English is uniquely positioned to assist international students in achieving their ICAO English proficiency goals and realizing their career goals. We are dedicated to fostering an international perspective throughout Aviator College as well as a global perspective of professionalism throughout the Aviation industry.

International students that are enrolling in one of our pilot programs and wish to increase their English to a level 4 (four) or higher, may enroll at our Aviation English Course at the same time. Research shows that students can quickly earn their ICAO level 4 (four) certificate in as little as one month, which could also reduce your cost in flight training. The course will consist of one month of training by highly experienced English Instructors and easy-to-follow curriculum. The curriculum consists of small classroom group studies, one-on-one instruction, data base and E-Mailing criteria.

International Flight Training Programs At Aviator Flight Training Academy


Commercial Airline Pilot Program
M-1 Visa

The Commercial Airline Pilot Program is for the international student that needs to possess an FAA multi-engine commercial certificate. The program could take as little as 4 months to complete. Shared housing is included for the duration of 4 months. In the program you will earn the private pilot, instrument, single engine commercial and multi-engine commercial. The program is an approved FAA part 141 program which most countries are requiring. Upon your graduation in this program you will receive a Part 141 Commercial Graduation Certificate.
Additional single or multi engine hours can be accumulated at reduced prices. for further information contact our admissions department by email or phone +1-772-466-4822.

Subtract -$6,100.00 if you hold a Private Pilot Certificate

Commercial Pilot Program with Flight Instructor Ratings
F-1 Visa

The Commercial Pilot Program with the addition of 3 flight instructor certificates is a Part 141 and Part 61 Program. The program is designed for the international student coming from countries requiring additional hours for employment in their country. Typically these countries require up to 1500 and to hold an FAA ATP(Airline Transport Pilot) certificate. The program can completed in as little as 6 months. Shared housing is included for the duration of the 6 months. After you have earned all required certificates, you then can be placed in the Part 141 standardization and CPT internship ( 510 hours ).Upon completion of the CPT internship you will then be able to apply for an instructor position for up to 12 months.

To be able to apply for OPT ( Flight instructor Position) you must have completed the program on time with no more than 1 checkride failure. Written exam grades must be at least 85% or higher and you must pass a flight instructor review board.

Subtract -$6,100.00 if you hold a Private Pilot Certificate

Commercial Airline Pilot Program
with FAA and EASA Flight Instructor Ratings
F-1 Visa

The Commercial Program with FAA & EASA Flight Flight Training – Our Instructors – Aviator Flight Training College Certificates ( European Pilots). this program meets all the requirements and licenses for FAA and EASA

The program will take approximately 12 to 15 months, Shared housing is included for 12 months. The ATPL ground school is taught on campus which consists of 650 classroom hours.The 14 written exams are held in Orlando, FL.

After you have earned all required certificates, you then can be placed in the Part 141 standardization and CPT internship ( 510 hours ).Upon completion of the CPT internship you will then be able to apply for an instructor position (OPT) for up to 12 months so that you can build experience.

To be able to apply for OPT ( Flight instructor Position) you must have completed the program on time with no more than 1 checkride failure. Written exam grades must be at least 85% or higher and you must pass a flight instructor review board.

Students interested in enrolling need to speak with an admissions officer prior to enrolling.
You can contact or admissions office at 1-772-466-4822.

Subtract -$6,100.00 if you hold a Private Pilot Certificate

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Educational Guide On Becoming An Airline Pilot

Educational Guide On Becoming An Airline PilotWhen flying is all you want to do, learning to fly is all on your agenda. Although you don’t need a student pilot certificate to take flying lessons, you do need one before you can fly solo. Student pilot certificate’s eligibility requirements are as follows:

  1. You are at least 16 years old. If you plan to pilot a glider or balloon, you must be at least 14 years old.
  2. You can read, speak, and understand English
  3. You hold at least a current third-class medical certificate. If you plan to pilot a glider or balloon, you only have to certify that you have no medical defect that would make you unable to pilot a glider or balloon.

You get a student pilot certificate by submitting a request to FAA inspector or an FAA-designated pilot examiner. an FAA-authorized aviation medical examiner will issue you a combined medical certificate and Student Pilot Certificate after you complete your physical examination. Applicants who fail to meet certain requirements or who have physical disabilities which might limit, but not prevent, their acting as pilots, should contact the nearest FAA office. Locate An Aviation Medical Examiner

Physical and Background Qualifications

Candidates must pass a physical exam demonstrating that they are in good health and without any physical limitations that could impair their performance. While commercial pilots must pass a physical exam every year, airline pilots must pass one every six months. A pilot’s vision does not have to be naturally perfect, but must be correctable to 20/20 with glasses or contacts. Airlines conduct a 10-year FBI background check along with driving record checks, drug tests and credit checks for all pilot applicants. Any felony convictions will disqualify you, as will any evidence of drug or alcohol abuse.

Personal Qualities

Pilots must be capable of quick reaction time and be able to make decisions rapidly under pressure. Many life-threatening emergencies can occur without warning, and pilots must be able to respond immediately and appropriately while remaining calm and in control. In addition, pilots must be detail-oriented, as they are required to simultaneously monitor many controls and systems. As pilots must work closely with their flight crew, air traffic controllers and flight dispatchers, the ability to work within a team is also an important quality.

Education and Training

Once you complete your first flight lesson, you are considered a Student Pilot. A typical pilot looking to get hired by the airlines will usually get the following certificates and ratting in the order listed below.

To begin flying, not even a high school diploma is necessary. The FAA does require people to read, write and speak English, though. Flight school, military training or private lessons give beginners their initial flight education. People wanting to fly recreationally can end their education here, graduating from student to recreational pilot by passing the test for a recreational certificate. Most pilots continue on, since the recreational certificate has many restrictions, including no passengers, no night flights and no ability to earn money for flight services.

Traditionally, the vast majority of pilots received their education and training through military service, because civilian flight schools could not begin to match the level of extensive training and flight hours provided by the military. Today, with decreasing numbers of people joining the armed forces, an increasing number of pilots are coming out of civilian flight schools, including colleges and universities that have been certified by the Federal Aviation Administration. Most airlines now require a bachelor’s degree. Although the degree can be in any subject, airlines generally prefer coursework in aviation, mathematics, physics, aeronautical engineering and English. The cost of civilian training can be prohibitive. The amount of flight school sufficient to obtain a commercial pilot’s license can cost up to $80,000; this is in addition to the cost of earning a bachelor’s degree. In Europe, airlines train and educate candidates who have little or no flying experience to become qualified airline pilots in exchange for a multiple-year employment commitment. This is called “ab initio” training and, while being considered for future implementation in the United States, it is not widely available in North America.

Licensure

All pilots whose job requires that they transport people or cargo are required to have a commercial pilot’s license and an instrument rating. To be eligible to take the licensing exam, pilots must be at least 18 years of age and have logged 250 hours of flight time. The licensing exam is a written test on FAA regulations, safety procedures and navigation techniques. After the written exam, pilots must undergo a flight test with an FAA-designated examiner to demonstrate their flying skills. Instrument rating is a test to show that pilots can fly during periods of low visibility using instrument readings alone. Instrument rating consists of accumulating 40 hours of instrument flight experience, a written exam and practical demonstration before an examiner. Source

Airline and Commercial Pilots

Airline and commercial pilots fly and navigate airplanes, helicopters, and other aircraft. Airline pilots fly for airlines that transport people and cargo on a fixed schedule. Commercial pilots fly aircraft for other reasons, such as charter flights, rescue operations, firefighting, aerial photography, and aerial application, also known as crop dusting.

Airline Pilot Pay

Median annual wages, May 2012
Airline pilots, copilots, and flight engineers -$114,200
Airline and commercial pilots -$98,410
Commercial pilots -$73,280

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics

The median annual wage for airline pilots, copilots, and flight engineers was $114,200 in May 2012. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $66,970, and the top 10 percent earned more than $187,200.
According to the Air Line Pilots Association, International, most airline pilots begin their careers earning about $20,000 per year. Wages increase each year until the pilot accumulates the experience and seniority needed to become a captain. The average captain at a regional airline earns about $55,000 per year, while the average captain at a major airline earns about $135,000 per year.

In addition, airline pilots receive an expense allowance, or “per diem,” for every hour they are away from home, and they may earn extra pay for international flights. Airline pilots also are eligible for health insurance and retirement benefits, and their immediate families usually are entitled to free or reduced-fare flights.
The median annual wage for commercial pilots was $73,280 in May 2012.The lowest 10 percent earned less than $38,520, and the top 10 percent earned more than $134,990. source

Why Choose Aviator Flight School For Your Pilot Training
  • Licensed by the State of Florida Commission For Independent Education License #4155
  • Aviator Flight Training Academy is a Division of Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology, which is licensed by the State of Florida Commission for Independent Education and Accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges.
  • 27 Years in the Flight Training Industry
  • To date, Aviator has trained over 5000 pilots for the commercial airline industry
  • Only School Offering 200 Hours of Multi-Engine Time
  • Aviator is the only flight school that has a full 200 hours of multi-engine time included in our program
  • No Flight Training Devices (Simulators)
  • FTDs are not used towards your flight time for any ratings
  • Approved by the Federal Department of Education to offer Title IV Loans
  • Aviator has the ability to offer students federal funding on approved accredited programs
  • Job Placement Assistance with Regional Airlines
  • Aviator offers job placement assistance for our graduates
  • “A” Rating with United States Better Business Bureau
  • Classroom Environment – All classes taught in our educational center, NOT online

Flight Training Programs for International Students With M1 and F1 Visas

Flight Training Programs for International Students With M1 and F1 VisasGenerally, a citizen of a foreign country who wishes to enter the United States must first obtain a visa, either a nonimmigrant visa for temporary stay, or an immigrant visa for permanent residence. You must have a student visa to study in the United States. Your course of study and the type of school you plan to attend determine whether you need an F-1 visa or an M-1 visa.

The “M” visa is for nonacademic or vocational studies. M-1 visa holders for technical and vocational programs are not permitted to work during the course of their studies. The M-1 student visa applicants must have evidence that sufficient funds are immediately available to pay all tuition and living costs for the entire period of intended stay.

M1 Student Visa Requirements

You cannot enter as an M1 to just study “generally”; your program must have a goal and you must be involved in a “full course of study”. A full course of study means study in a community or junior college, with at least 12 semester or quarter hours. It must be in a school where anyone attending for at least 12 semester or quarter hours is charged full tuition, or considered full-time. The only exception is where you need a smaller course-load to complete your course of study. It can also mean study at a post secondary vocational or business school which grants Associate or other degrees. Alternatively, if a school can demonstrate that its credits are, or have been, accepted unconditionally by at least 3 institutions of higher learning it can qualify. If that is not possible, study in a vocational or nonacademic curriculum, certified by a DSO to require at least 18 hours of weekly attendance or at least 22 clock hours a week (if most of your studies are in a shop or lab). If that is not possible, the last option is study in a vocational or nonacademic high school curriculum which is certified by a DSO to require class attendance for not less than the minimum required for normal progress towards graduation.

F1 Student Visa Requirements

An F1 visa is issued to international students who are attending an academic program or English Language Program at a US college or university. F-1 students must maintain the minimum course load for full-time student status. They can remain in the US up to 60 days beyond the length of time it takes to complete their academic program, unless they have applied and been approved to stay and work for a period of time under the OPT program, as described below. F1 students are expected to complete their studies by the expiration date on their I-20 form (Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant Student Status) which is provided by the US college or university that the student has been accepted to and will attend.

In order to qualify, applicants need to satisfy and prove several strict criteria during an F1 visa interview:

  1. Must have a foreign residence and must intend to return there upon completion of studies;
  2. Can only study at the academic institution through which the visa was granted;
  3. Must have sufficient financial support;
  4. Must have strong ties to home country (e.g. job offer letter upon completion of studies, assets, bank accounts, and family).

An F-1 student is generally entitled up to one year of post-completion optional practical training, or OPT. Authorization for this type of practical training may be granted for a maximum of 12 months and only starts once you have graduated or completed your course of study. Students in STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) can extend their OPT authorization for up to 29 months. Please visit our Working in the USA section for complete information regarding OPT and other permitted employment for F1 students. Source

International Flight Training Programs at Aviator Flight Training Academy
Commercial Airline Pilot Program, M-1 Visa

The Commercial Airline Pilot Program is for the international student that needs to possess an FAA multi-engine commercial certificate. The program could take as little as 4 months to complete. Housing is included for the duration of 4 months. In the program you will earn the private pilot, instrument, single engine commercial and multi-engine commercial. The program is an approved FAA part 141 program which most countries are requiring. Upon your graduation in this program you will receive a Part 141 Commercial Graduation Certificate.
Additional single or multi engine hours can be accumulated at reduced prices. for further information contact our admissions department by email or phone +1-772-466-4822.

NOTE: Subtract -$6,100.00 if you hold a Private Pilot Certificate

Commercial Pilot Program with Flight Instructor Ratings , F-1 Visa

The Commercial Pilot Program with the addition of 3 flight instructor certificates is a Part 141 and Part 61 Program. The program is designed for the international student coming from countries requiring additional hours for employment in their country. Typically these countries require up to 1500 and to hold an FAA ATP(Airline Transport Pilot) certificate. The program can completed in as little as 6 months. Housing is included for the duration of the 6 months. After you have earned all required certificates, you then can be placed in the Part 141 standardization and CPT internship ( 510 hours ).Upon completion of the CPT internship you will then be able to apply for an instructor position for up to 12 months.

To be able to apply for OPT ( Flight instructor Position) you must have completed the program on time with no more than 1 checkride failure. Written exam grades must be at least 85% or higher and you must pass a flight instructor review board.

NOTE: Subtract -$6,100.00 if you hold a Private Pilot Certificate

Commercial Airline Pilot Program with FAA and EASA Flight Instructor Ratings
F-1 Visa

The Commercial Program with FAA & EASA Flight Instructor Certificates ( European Pilots). this program meets all the requirements and licenses for FAA and EASA

The program will take approximately 12 to 15 months, housing is included for 12 months. The ATPL ground school is taught on campus which consists of 650 classroom hours.The 14 written exams are held in Orlando, FL.

After you have earned all required certificates, you then can be placed in the Part 141 standardization and CPT internship ( 510 hours ).Upon completion of the CPT internship you will then be able to apply for an instructor position (OPT) for up to 12 months so that you can build experience.

To be able to apply for OPT ( Flight instructor Position) you must have completed the program on time with no more than 1 checkride failure. Written exam grades must be at least 85% or higher and you must pass a flight instructor review board.

Students interested in enrolling need to speak with an admissions officer prior to enrolling. You can contact or admissions office at 1-772-466-4822.

NOTE: Subtract -$6,100.00 if you hold a Private Pilot Certificate

Contact Aviator
International Students Department

How Commercial Pilot License Flight Training Hours Are Built

How Commercial Pilot License Flight Training Hours Are BuiltWith Commercial Pilot License (CPL) you are able to fly and make a living, meaning transport customers for a fee. If that is your goal, outlined below are some steps you need in preparation for CPL training.
Before you start training for the CPL you need to hold at least a private pilot license (PPL) and an instrument rating (IR) is advised. In order to get your commercial pilot license, you must first have a private pilot license. You will also need your instrument rating. If you do not have this, your commercial license will be issued with a limitation on it. If you wish to fly multi-engine aircraft, you will also need your multi-engine rating.

CPL Minimum Requirements
  • Be 18 years old
  • Speak English
  • Hold a private pilot certificate
  • Pass the practical test on aeronautical knowledge
  • Log 250 hours of flight time for single or multi-engine airplane rating
  • Log 150 hours of flight time for a helicopter or gyroplane rating
  • Pass a practical test

CPL Privileges

  1. Exercise all the privileges of the holder of a PPL(A) / PPL(H);
  2. Act as co-pilot (First Officer) in commercial air transportation
  3. Act as pilot-in-command or co-pilot of any airplane (CPL(A) / helicopter (CPL(H)) engaged in operations other than commercial air transportation.
  4. Act as pilot-in-command in commercial air transportation of any single-pilot airplane / helicopter
Commercial Pilot License in the United States (FAA)

There are two ways of obtaining the commercial pilot license in the United States; through a certified instructor or through a certified flight school (part 141). If you choose to fly with a freelance instructor in a flight club you need at least 250 hours of total flight time. These are broken down in cross country hours, pilot in command time etc. Most commercial pilots in the United States have close to or over 250 hours when they get the CPL.

Flying with a part 141 flight school the hour requirements are a little less. However you have to do your flight training from scratch (private pilot license) in a part 141 program. This way you can obtain the CPL at a minimum of 190 hours total time. It is also a requirement that you have completed the instrument rating (IR), or currently enrolled in an instrument rating (IR) course.

Commercial Pilot License in Europe (JAA)

The training for the commercial pilot license in Europe is slightly different then in the United States. Many flight schools do your instrument rating (IR) and multi engine class (ME) combined with the commercial training. This way you only do one “check ride” (flight exam) and obtain the multi engine class and instrument rating (IR) on the commercial pilot license right away.

Depending on the flight school’s program you do a total of 130 hours flight time before you get the CPL. As most students aiming for a commercial license in Europe are career oriented they usually follow a scratch to CPL program and can therefore get away with less flight hours.

CPL Flight Training Broken Down
  • 100 hours as pilot-in-command
  • 20 hours of VFR cross-country flight time as pilot-in-command, including a cross-country flight totaling at least 540 km (300 NM) in the course of with full-stop landings at two aerodromes different from the aerodromes of departure
  • 10 hours of instrument training
  • 5 hours of night flying including one cross-country flight and 5 solo take-offs and 5 landings
  • 5 hours on a complex airplane
CPL FAQ

Does having my commercial pilot license mean I am able to fly jets?
Not exactly. A commercial pilot license allows you to fly for hire. There is no way to get a job flying jets or any of the airliners without having obtained a commercial pilot license. Just having the commercial license does not mean you can instantly get in the cockpit of a 737. Additional training and experience is required above just having a commercial license. However, there is no possibility of being hired for a flying job without a commercial pilot license on your resume. It is a legal requirement set forth by the FAA.

Do I have to have my instrument rating to be able to get my commercial pilot license?
No. You can take the test for becoming a commercial pilot without having already obtained your instrument rating. However, the commercial pilot license will have some restrictions on it. Since there is a requirement to log 250 hours of total time before you can test for your commercial license, most people work on their instrument rating while they are accumulating those hours in their logbook. This method makes the most sense financially for most people. However, it is not required to have your instrument rating before testing for your commercial pilot license.

What is the best way to build the 50 hours of required cross-country time that I need for a commercial pilot license?
There are many different ways to go about building your cross country time. If you are on a set budget, I recommend coming up with a plan before you get too far into your cross country time. This plan really should be formed before you start working on your instrument time since you need 50 hours of cross country time for your instrument rating.

Will we do very much instrument work while I work on my commercial license?
For a single-engine commercial pilot license, there is no instrument requirement to meet. If you are planning on adding on a multi-engine commercial license, you can plan on doing some instrument work during the multi-engine training.

Can I fly multi-engine airplanes after I get my commercial pilot license?
Having the privilege to fly a multi-engine airplane means that you need to have flight training specific to multi-engine airplanes. If you already have a single-engine commercial pilot license, it is just some additional training to add on a multi-engine license. It may be possible to take your single and multi-engine commercial pilot test in the same day!
Source

Commercial Pilot License Cost

Flight training for CPL is a very serious commitment that requires both time and money. To estimate exactly how much money is needed depends on each student.

Most flight schools will quote you a cost associated with a certain flight package. And that’s great, if you stick to the package. However, many people find themselves slacking off, or not flying as much as they are suppose to each week. In addition, you may need to repeat certain classes in order to feel completely comfortable. In order to get your private pilot license, the FAA only requires 40 hours of flight time, but many people take 60 hours, or even as much as 80 hours. You can see how this easily can double the cost associated with getting just your private pilot license. In fact. the longer you take to get your license, the prices associated with the lessons and flight time needed increase too.

In general, you may say it takes between $6,000 to $12,000 to get your private pilot license. A commercial license requires 250 hours of flight time. So if it took you 50 hours of flight time to get your private pilot licenst, then you will need an additional 200 hours of flight time. Just for the required flight hours, you’d be looking at a minimum of $24,000 and upwards to $50,000, depending on how quickly you learn. You will also need to take your ground schooling classes.

So all in all, you might expect to pay around $30,000 to $50,000 total for your flight training, if you are very motivated and on track with your ground classes and flight time.

One of the ways you can moderate the cost of getting your commercial pilot license is to take an accelerated flight training program. This is essentially going to flight school full time to get in the required number of hours of class and flight time needed to attain your license. Source

Pro Pilot Program At Aviator Flight School

The programs at Aviator Flight School are designed to provide what the airline industry demands of future commercial pilots. The training you will receive at Aviator is one of the most intensive and challenging programs offered in aviation flight training today.

During your flight training you will fly a total of 259 hours, of which up to 200 hours will be in a multi-engine aircraft. The ground school portion is in a structured classroom environment. As the shortage of pilots continues to grow, Aviator College is consistently meeting with major air carriers to determine the flight training and education that they require.

You will receive a minimum of 643 instructional hours for the Professional Pilot Program.The instructional hours includes all ground and flight training. 6 months of housing is included in the price of the program. If you come with a Private Pilot License 5 months will be included in the price of the Program.

Contact Aviator
Schedule a Visit

Applying for US Pilot Certificate On the Basis of a Foreign Pilot License

Applying for US Pilot Certificate On the Basis of a Foreign Pilot LicensePilot licensing or certification refers to permits to fly aircraft that are issued by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) in each country, establishing that the holder has met a specific set of knowledge and experience requirements. The certified pilot has a right to specific pilot privileges in the country where certificate is issued . Despite attempts to harmonize the requirements between nations, the differences in certification practices and standards from place to place serve to limit full international validity of the national qualifications.

In the United States, pilot certification is regulated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), a branch of the Department of Transportation (DOT). A pilot is certified under the authority of Parts 61 and 141 of Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations, also known as the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs). In Canada, licensing is issued by Transport Canada. In the United Kingdom, licensing is issued by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA).

In most European countries, including the United Kingdom, France, Switzerland, and many others, licensing is issued by the National Aviation Authority (NAA) according to a set of common rules established by the Joint Aviation Authorities known as Joint Aviation Rules – Flight Crew Licensing (JAR-FCL). Source-Wikipedia

Determining Validity of Foreign License

FAA’s The Airmen Certification Branch, AFS-760 must have the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) verify the validity and currency of the foreign license and medical certificate or endorsement before you apply for an FAA certificate or authorization. The processing of the Verification of Authenticity of Foreign License, Rating, and Medical Certification form takes approximately 45 to 90 days to complete. NOTE: Do not schedule any travel and/or checkrides, etc until a valid Verification Letter has been obtained from AFS-760.

Foreign applicants who require a visit to a FAA Flight Standards District Office or are applying for the issuance or replacement of an airman certificate in accordance with 14 CFR 61.75 must contact their selected Flight Standards District Office upon receipt of this verification letter to schedule an appointment with a FAA Inspector or authorized certifying official. Do not anticipate an appointment earlier than two weeks after this initial contact, due to enhanced security procedures.

14 CFR Part 61, Section 61.75-Allows a person to be issued a U.S. pilot certificate with private pilot privileges on the basis of a foreign pilot license that is equivalent to or higher than the U.S. private pilot certification level. The foreign pilot license must have been issued by a foreign Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) that is a member state of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), and the foreign pilot license must be valid. The holder of a valid foreign pilot license issued by an ICAO member state may use that foreign pilot license as the basis for issuance of a U.S. pilot certificate even if the issuing country is now defunct (e.g., the Russian Federation).

Procedures for Conversion of Canadian and U.S. Pilot Certificates Only

Under a new Bilateral Agreement between the United States and Canada, effective December 5, 2006, pilots in the United States and Canada may apply for a new unrestricted airman certificate. This procedure only applies to a Canadian or U.S. pilot holding a private, commercial, or ATP SEL or MEL airman certificate. Glider, helicopter, and balloon ratings are excluded and are not applicable for conversion under the agreement. Read the FAA’s Advisory Circular 61.35, Conversion Procedures and Processes for FAA Pilot Certificates and TCCA Pilot Licenses, and Transport Canada’s General Aviation Advisory Circular 401-001 for information and instructions.

TSA Alien Flight Training/Citizenship Validation Rule

On September 21, 2004, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) issued an ” interim final rule” on flight training for aliens and other designated individuals. When the interim rule was first issued, it required every person to prove his or her citizenship status (including U.S. citizens) prior to undertaking flight training in an aircraft weighing 12,500 pounds or less. Additionally, all foreign flight students were required to complete a background check process with TSA. Not only did the rule apply to flight training, but also to recurrent training under 14 CFR Part 61. This meant that pilots would have to prove citizenship, and aliens submit background checks, for flight reviews, instrument proficiency checks, and aircraft checkouts.

Determining Applicability and Eligibility
Applicability.

This requirement applies if the applicant is applying for a certificate issued on the basis of a foreign license under the provisions of:
14 CFR Part 61, § 61.75,

  • Special-purpose pilot authorizations under § 61.77,
  • Using a pilot certificate issued under § 61.75 to apply for a commercial pilot certificate under § 61.123(h),
  • Applying for an airline transport pilot certificate issued under § 61.153(d)(3),
  • Applying for a certificate issued on the basis of a foreign license under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 63, § 63.23 and § 63.42.

The applicant must have the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) that issued those certificates verify the validity and currency of the foreign license and medical certificate or endorsement before applying for an FAA certificate or authorization.
Eligibility; English Language Requirements. Early in the process of issuing a private pilot certificate on the basis of a foreign pilot license, the FAA aviation safety inspector (ASI) (Operations) or an FAA aviation safety technician (AST) must determine whether the applicant can read, speak, write, and understand the English language. Advisory Circular (AC) 60-28, English Language Skill Standards Required by 14 CFR parts 61, 63, and 65, explains how to determine English language abilities required for pilot certification.

Eligibility

Medical Requirements. A person applying for a U.S. pilot certificate must submit evidence that he or she currently meets the medical standards for the foreign pilot license on which the application for the pilot certificate is based (see § 61.75[f]). Some foreign Civil Aviation Authorities (CAA) enter periodic medical endorsements on their foreign pilot licenses, which affect the license’s currency. Therefore, if the foreign pilot license must have a medical endorsement in order to be valid, an FAA medical certificate alone will not satisfy the regulations.

In cases when a medical endorsement is not used, a current medical license from the person’s foreign medical examiner or a current FAA airman medical certificate issued under 14 CFR Part 67 will satisfy the requirement.
If the person’s foreign pilot license shows a medical endorsement, the person should enter the word “endorsement” on FAA Form 8710-1, Section I, block R, or the equivalent class of medical certificate. If using Airman Certification and/or Rating Application (ACRA)/IACRA, enter the date of that endorsement in block S. If the name of the examiner who administered the medical endorsement is unknown to the applicant because the foreign CAA administered the physical, then simply state “CAA” in block T.

Applying For Rating or Medical Certificate

A person who is applying for a U.S. rating or medical certificate on the basis of a foreign license must apply for that certificate at least 90 days before arriving at the designated FAA FSDO where the applicant intends to receive the U.S. certificate. This initial application step is the responsibility of the applicant.

The information you submit to the Airmen Certification Branch must include your:
  1. name and date of birth
  2. address where you wish to have the verification of the authenticity letter mailed
  3. certificate number and ratings on the foreign license
  4. country of issuance of your foreign license
  5. location of the FAA Flight Standards District Office where you intend to apply for your U.S. certificate
  6. statement that your foreign license is not under an order of suspension or revocation

Note: The Airmen Certification Branch would prefer to have a copy of the foreign license and medical certificate or endorsement included with all requests for verification of authenticity of the foreign license.

There are additional requirements for pilots from the following countries. Please visit FAA website for details:

  • Australia
  • Cyprus
  • Malaysia
  • New Zealand
  • Pakistan
  • United Kingdom Applicants

Source
http://www.faa.gov/licenses_certificates/airmen_certification/foreign_license_verification/
http://www.aopa.org/Pilot-Resources/PIC-archive/Flight-Training-Ratings-and-Proficiency/Foreign-Pilot-Certification.aspx

International Flight Training Programs From Aviator Flight Training Academy
Commercial Airline Pilot Program

M-1 Visa
The Commercial Airline Pilot Program is for the international student that needs to possess an FAA multi-engine commercial certificate. The program could take as little as 4 months to complete. Housing is included for the duration of 4 months. In the program you will earn the private pilot, instrument, single engine commercial and multi-engine commercial. The program is an approved FAA part 141 program which most countries are requiring. Upon your graduation in this program you will receive a Part 141 Commercial Graduation Certificate.

Additional single or multi engine hours can be accumulated at reduced prices. for further information contact our admissions department by email or phone +1-772-466-4822.

Commercial Pilot Program with Flight Instructor Ratings

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The Commercial Pilot Program with the addition of 3 flight instructor certificates is a Part 141 and Part 61 Program. The program is designed for the international student coming from countries requiring additional hours for employment in their country. Typically these countries require up to 1500 and to hold an FAA ATP(Airline Transport Pilot) certificate. The program can completed in as little as 6 months. Housing is included for the duration of the 6 months. After you have earned all required certificates, you then can be placed in the Part 141 standardization and CPT internship ( 510 hours ).Upon completion of the CPT internship you will then be able to apply for an instructor position for up to 12 months.

To be able to apply for OPT ( Flight instructor Position) you must have completed the program on time with no more than 1 checkride failure. Written exam grades must be at least 85% or higher and you must pass a flight instructor review board.

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Are You A Helicopter Or Airplane Pilot. Learn About Each Pilot’s Career Path

Are You A Helicopter Or Airplane Pilot. Learn About Each Pilot’s Career PathYou know you have a passion to fly. To begin training to be a pilot, you also need to know what you want to fly and the type of flying you want to do. Federal Aviation Administration’s rules for getting a pilot’s license (certificate) differ depending on the type of aircraft you fly. You can choose among airplanes, gyroplanes, helicopters, gliders, balloons, or airships. You should also think about what type of flying you want to do. In this blog, we will cover flight training and job opportunities for helicopter and airplane pilots.

Flying a helicopter is completely different from flying an airplane, but that doesn’t mean it’s any harder. Airplanes and helicopters have many commonalities and differences.

Key Differences Between Helicopter and Airplane Pilots

The main difference is the obvious one; Airplanes and Helicopters are completely different machines with different flight characteristics, capabilities and missions. Job opportunities and variety of it may be different but flight training to become a helicopter or airplane pilot is the same. It all begins with a flight school where you train for your new career. Both Helicopter and Airplane Pilots undergo similar flight training in order to receive the ratings necessary to launch a career. Upon completion of your flight training, you will be presented with a few options. Airplane Pilots may find themselves doing Arial Towing of Advertising Banners, Crop Dusting or a similar line of work in order to gain the experience necessary to take their career to an Airline. Helicopter Pilots generally follow a career track of first becoming a Certified Flight Instructor teaching students as they continue to hone their skills and build their flight time. Becoming an Instructor is also an option for the Airplane Pilot as well. Either way, you will need to land your first entry level piloting job in order to progress your career.

Which Career Path is For You?
Helicopter Pilot Opinion.

This is where there’s a key difference between Helicopters and Airplanes. As a current Helicopter Instructor Pilot,

I will do my best to not be biased here…difficult as that may be! Once you build your time and get the required 1500 hours as an airplane pilot you will need to get what the FAA calls an Airline Transport Pilot Certificate, known as your ATP. This is a requirement for Airplane Pilots in order to begin working for Air Carrier operators. Once you are there, you can enjoy a lucrative career as an Airline Pilot working for a major Air Carrier hauling passengers or cargo. This can prove to be an excellent career. Now here comes the Helicopter Pilot in me: do you want to fly straight line distances at 30,000 feet on autopilot, or do you want to FLY in a dynamic environment? You have to ask yourself what type of flying you actually want to be doing.

Pilot Training

The first step in Airplane Flight Training is to get a Private Pilot License (PPL), followed by a Commercial Pilot License (CPL). Pilots with PPL in hand can enjoy flying but cannot get paid to transport. CPL license allows you to get paid for transporting passengers.

Learning to fly is a matter of acquiring aeronautical knowledge, flight proficiency, and experience. Think of the process of earning a recreational or private pilot certificate as a series of steps. Some steps, such as aeronautical knowledge, can be integrated throughout your training process. Others, like solo training, come when your instructor has provided the required training and he or she decides that you are ready. The process can be broken down into the following subjects:

Aeronautical Knowledge and FAA Knowledge Test
  • Pre-solo training
  • Solo training
  • Cross-county training (for private pilots)
  • Solo cross-county training (for private pilots)
  • Practical Test preparation
  • Practical Test

Every hour you earn adds to airline flight training. Some aviation careers pay a lot better than others, and each promise different lifestyles. Think about where you would like to be in 20 years. This will help you with your decisions now and in the future.

To land a job as a pilot you need to ake any job you can get in an aviation company, even if it does not involve flying at first. Stay positive, work hard and work on your skills to show it off. In aviation, networking is paramount, and people help people they know, like and trust.

Airline flight training never ends, even once in the airline there will always be another aircraft to convert to, requiring weeks of training.

As a Commercial Pilot you may work for an Airline, or a Charter Company, and the company’s consideration is made based on whether you have an Instrument and Twin Engine rating, preferably turbine or jet time as well. If you want to progress up the ranks, you will have to get your Airline Transport Pilots License. Although “Airline Pilot” is the most thought of job associated with the word “pilot” it is not the only one in aviation field.

Helicopter Job Opportunities

There are some truly exciting jobs open to helicopter pilots. In the civilian area, there are opportunities with law enforcement, TV and radio news, traffic reporting, hospital patient transport, aerial photo, agricultural spraying, offshore oil work, heavy-lift, sightseeing, fire fighting, fish-spotting, pilot flight training, and corporate transportation — just to name a few.

State and Federal governmental agencies also employ helicopter pilots for conservation, forestry, survey, research, search and rescue, etc. U.S. agencies like Customs, the Border Patrol, the DEA (Drug Enforcement Administration), the FBI, and others hire (and sometimes train) professional helicopter pilots.

In the military area, all branches of the Armed Forces train helicopter pilots for a wide variety of jobs. The Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard all use helicopters in their day-to-day missions not only for combat and troop transport, but for search-and-rescue, anti-submarine patrols, and moving troops and material. Source

Possible Career Paths for the Experienced Helicopter Pilot
  • EMS Pilot
  • Pipeline Patrol Pilot
  • Offshore Oil Rig Pilot
  • Air Tour Pilot
  • Charter Pilot
  • Logging Pilot
  • Bush Pilot
  • Border Patrol
  • Local, State or Federal Law Enforcement
  • Professional Instructor Pilot

Source

Airline Pilot Jobs and Opportunities

Pilots who earn a living at the “majors,” such as United, American, Delta, and Federal Express, fly large jet equipment such as Boeing’s 737, 757, and 777. The average salary for a major airline pilot is in the $100,000 range, with senior captains flying mega-size airplanes (i.e., Boeing 747/400) earning up to $200,000 annually. For flying professionals associated with the “regionals,” smaller turboprop airplanes are the norm. Entry-level salary for a commuter pilot is invariably in the $20,000 to $25,000 range; a captain on a new regional jet can earn $70,000 to $110,000 annually with seniority.

Major airlines, the companies that are most highly desired and attract the most competitive candidates, will require in the neighborhood of 1,500 to 3,000 flight time hours and about 300 to 500 hours of multiengine time for application acceptance. Additionally, a four-year college degree is virtually a must because more than 80 percent of pilots interviewed had at least a four-year degree.

Most regional airlines require about 1,500 total hours, including 500 hours in multiengine airplanes. However, a few companies have been known to hire applicants with only 1,000 hours of total flight time and 100 hours of multiengine experience. Although a college degree is helpful, it is not a requirement.

Licenses Needed for Pilot Careers

Airline Pilot (CPL okay, but will need ATLP eventually)
Corporate Pilot (CPL okay, ATLP recommended)
Fire Spotter Pilot (VFR CPL)
Survey Pilot (VFR CPL)
Charter Pilot (CPL to ATPL)
Flight Instructor (CPL, ATPL for DE qualification required)
Medical evacuation Pilot (IF CPL minimum)
Fire Bomber Pilot (VFR CPL)
Crop Sprayer/Agricultural Pilot (VFR CPL)
Crop Sprayer / Agricultural Pilot (VFR CPL)
Contract Pilot (IF CPL minimum)
Aerobatic Display Pilot (VFR PPL / CPL)
Bush Pilot (VFR CPL)
Police Pilot (VFR CPL minimum)
Nature Conservation Pilot (VFR PPL / CPL)
Airforce Pilot.(Military qualification, in-house)

Pilot School Locator
Aviator Flight School Pro Pilot Program

The programs at Aviator Flight School are designed to provide what the airline industry demands of future commercial pilots. The training you will receive at Aviator is one of the most intensive and challenging programs offered in aviation flight training today.

During your flight training you will fly a total of 259 hours, of which up to 200 hours will be in a multi-engine aircraft. The ground school portion is in a structured classroom environment. As the shortage of pilots continues to grow, Aviator College is consistently meeting with major air carriers to determine the flight training and education that they require.
You will receive a minimum of 643 instructional hours for the Professional Pilot Program.The instructional hours includes all ground and flight training. 6 months of housing is included in the price of the program. If you come with a Private Pilot License 5 months will be included in the price of the Program.

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Pilot Training Guide List for Future Pilots

Pilot Training Guide List for Future PilotsTo operate an aircraft in the United States you must be licensed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), which since 9/11 is part of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). There are several levels of pilot’s license; the most basic is the Private Pilot license. This license permits the holder to pilot an aircraft anywhere in the United States, and to carry passengers. A Private Pilot may not be paid to fly an aircraft (to ferry an aircraft from one location to another, for example), nor carry passengers or cargo for hire or compensation.

Private Pilot License Requirements
  • Be at least 16 years old.
  • Read, speak, and understand English sufficiently to understand the aviation rules and communicate with Air Traffic Control.
  • Pass a basic medical examination.
  • Receive the required amount of instruction from a Certificated Flight Instructor (CFI).
  • Pass a written examination (100 multiple-choice questions).
  • Pass a “checkride” (aircraft equivalent of a driving test) given by an FAA-approved examiner.
Flight Training Cost

The one thing to remember about flight training is it must be cost-effective. Flight training is expensive so your investment must be smart. Do not base your decision on the cost the flight school offers or advertises. Visit the flight school, speak with flight instructors and pilot students. Inquire about FAA flight training programs offered. In addition to cost, the key factors to consider when choosing a flight school are:

1. Weather. How often you will be able to fly.
2. FAA approved flight training programs
3. Quality of CFIs.

Flight Training Hours Needed To Receive Pilot License

To receive a Private Pilot license, the FAA requires student pilots have a minimum of 40 hours of flight time, of which 20 must be dual (flying with an instructor). You have seen these hours before and they are minimum. Flight training needed can be different for anyone. It is very rare that students actually are able to get their flight training completed within 40 hours. National standard is usually between 60-70 hours.

About half of your flight time will be with an instructor, and the rest “solo.” For every flight hour, expect an additional 2-3 hours of reading, flight planning, and ground review with your instructor.

To maintain a good rate of progress, plan for two to three sessions per week, of two to three hours per session. Plan to schedule a few more sessions than you need, since some
will be cancelled because of weather, aircraft maintenance, illness, etc. At this rate, you should be able to earn your license in six to eight months.

Pilot License Academics and Topics Studied
  • Aircraft systems: the basic components of an airplane, engine, flight controls, instruments, and how they operate.
  • Aerodynamics: basic priciples of how an airplane is able to leave the ground, and how to control it once airborne.
  • Navigation: how to use aviation maps and radio navigation aids to get you and your aircraft to your destination.
  • Weather: basic concepts of weather formation, and how to obtain and interpret weather information that may affect your flight.
  • Aircraft operations: just as there are rules for operating automobiles on roads and highways, there are rules governing the operation of aircraft in the National Airspace System (NAS).
  • Regulations: the applicable portions of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) which govern licensing of pilots and the licensing and operation of aircraft in the USA.
Flight Training Facilities

The list below describes the types of facilities that offer flight training. Research your area for the type of business that suits your needs best.

Fixed Base Operator (FBO): This type of business offers a full range of aviation services: aircraft sales and maintenance, fuel sales, aircraft charter, flight instruction, or any other services that transient or based aircraft and pilots might need. Aircraft rental and flight instruction may be only a small part of this business.

Flight school: a business whose primary business is flight training and aircraft rental. It may offer other related services such as aircraft maintenance and pilot supplies.

Flying club: a non-profit group of pilots and aircraft owners who join together to help reduce expenses and share resources. Some larger clubs may look just like FBOs or flight schools. Since clubs are non-profit, rental rates are usually lower than at FBOs or flight schools.

Colleges and Universities: many colleges and universities offer flight training as part of an aviation curriculum. If you intend to pursue a career in aviation, a college degree in aviation is a definite advantage.
Note that some FBOs and flight schools may call themselves flying clubs to imply non-profit status, give them a more “friendly” atmosphere, or provide an excuse to charge monthly dues.

Careers in Aviation

The airline industry has been going through a rough transition for years now. From buttoned-down security to sky-high gas prices, it’s been a bumpy ride. Still, the fact remains that people want to travel and there are plenty of jobs available at airlines, airports, airplane companies and security organizations around the globe.

Many people wish for the glamorous lifestyle and income of a pilot. According to Al Lee, director of quantitative analysis at online salary database PayScale.com. He says, “There’s a huge variation in pay depending on whether you’re flying a float plane for a regional commuter company or flying 747s for United. Regional airlines sometimes pay $20 per hour and only when the engine is on.” Lee says that with only 1000 hours of engine time a year, that hourly rate can come close to minimum wage.

Aircraft pilot is of course the most glamorous and sought after job, but there are lots of other career paths in aviation. Others include but not limited to:

  • Aircraft Mechanic
  • Air Traffic Control
  • Aircraft Manufacturing
  • Flight Instructor
  • Airport Management

Aircraft avionics in particular is an area of rapid growth, offering jobs in manufacturing, installation, maintenance, and training.

Where can I find more information on becoming a pilot and pilot training?

The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) has a large section of their web site devoted to information on learning to fly:

Other source used

Why Choose Aviator Flight School For Your Pilot Training
  • Licensed by the State of Florida Commission For Independent Education License #4155
  • Aviator Flight Training Academy is a Division of Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology, which is licensed by the State of Florida Commission for Independent Education and Accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges.
  • 27 Years in the Flight Training Industry
  • To date, Aviator has trained over 5000 pilots for the commercial airline industry
  • Only School Offering 200 Hours of Multi-Engine Time
  • Aviator is the only flight school that has a full 200 hours of multi-engine time included in our program
  • No Flight Training Devices (Simulators)
  • FTDs are not used towards your flight time for any ratings
  • Approved by the Federal Department of Education to offer Title IV Loans
  • Aviator has the ability to offer students federal funding on approved accredited programs
  • Job Placement Assistance with Regional Airlines
  • Aviator offers job placement assistance for our graduates
  • “A” Rating with United States Better Business Bureau
  • Classroom Environment – All classes taught in our educational center, NOT online 

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