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Finding Funding For Your Flight Training

November 25, 2013 Leave a comment

Finding Funding For Your Flight TrainingBeing a pilot is a dream for many, only some can make it happen. The major deterrent of not following thru with flight training is the cost. Flight training is an investment, and in addition to money, you need to invest time. If you considering going to college to pursue aviation career, there are plenty of options available.

Aviation Scholarships and Grants

The rising costs of a college education have made some feel that postsecondary degrees are a luxury. There is no need to see things this way as help is there for those who need it. College scholarships and grants are readily available to students willing to do the research and pay attention to the regulations.

Grant and scholarship providers set their own rules about who can and cannot apply and students should not waste their time applying for scholarships and grants for which they are not eligible. Finding college scholarships and grants with eligibility criteria you meet is key to receiving awards. The more applications providers receive, the more likely they are to toss aside those of students who don’t match their target profile, no matter how good the essay or project.

The key to making your application stand out is to show that you have the discipline, attention to detail, and motivation to make good on what the scholarship or loan has to offer. Some tips to follow when applying for aviation scholarship.

Find The Right Source

AOPA’s Aviation Services department has compiled much information on scholarships and loans, including an extensive listing of available scholarships. The subject report, Aviation Scholarships and Loans, is available to members free online.

FAA also compiles a comprehensive list of scholarships in aviation. Some are listed below. For a full list and other information, please visit FAA scholarships page.

  • AeroClub of New England’s Scholarship Program
  • Amelia Earhart Memorial Scholarships & Awards
  • Astronaut Scholarship Foundation
  • AvScholars.com
  • Boeing Scholarships
  • Girls With Wings Scholarship
  • LeRoy W. Homer Jr. Scholarship
  • National Coalition for Aviation Education (NCAE)
  • University Aviation Association (UAA) Aviation Scholarship Guide

Once you’ve determined whether a loan or scholarship is your best bet, you need to turn your attention to the application. Scholarships require the applicant to meet specific criteria during the application process.

Deadlines

Be sure to check the deadlines of college scholarships and grants before beginning the necessary work. Providers know the deadlines well; it’s tough to fool them. It’s best to apply early in the case that materials get lost or misplaced but if you can’t help but ship things priority mail the night before they are due, at least make sure you have the dates straight. Do the applications have to be in by the deadline or must they be postmarked by the deadline? If you don’t know, call and ask. These seemingly small details can make all the difference.

Age

It may not always seem fair but rules are rules. If your scholarship of interest is restricted to high school seniors who turn 18 by December 1st and you’re a high school senior who turns 18 on the 2nd, don’t waste your time. For whatever reason, the provider has set these rules and there’s no use in spending your time on such awards. Myriad college scholarships and grants are out there, ones that you are qualified to receive. To find scholarships that match your qualifications, you may conduct a free college scholarship search at Scholarships.com.

Follow Directions

Your success depends on simply following instructions. For example, if you are told to send five complete sets of paperwork, ensure that you send five copies of each page of the application. If the instructions say to send the materials stapled, don’t send them in a folder. Also, don’t send attachments such as videotapes or CDs containing parts of your portfolio, unless the sponsor specifically requests such material.

Recommendation Letters

Your letters of recommendation should be current. Typically, one letter should be from a person in aviation, one who knows your skills and experience. Another letter should be from someone who has known you for a long time, a friend or neighbor. The third letter can be from someone who knows your work ethic. This might be another person in aviation, or it might be a friend. This person could also address what you have achieved, and how, and where you are expecting to go from here. Be sure your recommendation letters are signed by the person who writes them with their complete contact information.

Appropriateness

Be sure you are eligible for what you are applying for. You must meet the minimum requirements for the scholarship, or you may need to wait another year or two before you apply for that particular scholarship. If you’d like a career in aviation but don’t necessarily need to fly for a living, look into scholarships for aviation management, engineering, dispatch, or aviation maintenance.

Neatness Counts

Most careers in aviation – professional pilot, maintenance technician, engineer – require attention to detail. How you prepare your application speaks loudly about how detail-oriented you are. When copying logbook pages, make a copy of the left and right page as best you can – that counts for one logbook page. Then, cut that copy and paste it onto a single sheet so the whole page can be copied in a readable format onto a single 8 1/2-by-11-inch sheet of paper. You may need to shrink the copy to make it fit onto one page if your logbook is large. Make it easy to access and read your flight times. Be sure that at the end of each page, your total time for the previous page has been included.
Also, make the aircraft types that you fly clear on your logbook pages. If you fly the same aircraft every day, give the entire N-number and type of aircraft in the first entry on each page, as well as the complete date. You also need to sign each logbook page to verify the accuracy of those entries.

Are You Current?

Be sure your medical is current and appropriate for that next rating you desire, and that copies of all your certificates are included, not just the last one you received. The airlines require a copy of your driver’s license, along with your driving record, available from your state. Your pass/fail record from the FAA is required for airline type ratings, too. If you plan to apply for an airline scholarship in the next year, get started right away on collecting those two pieces of essential information. It takes several months for some states to get driving records to you.

Fill In The Blanks

On the application, as with all forms, fill out all blanks legibly. Mention only the company’s name at the top of your application, and copy the blank form before you fill it in. Then make the required copies after you have completed each application.

Writing The Essay

The essay is your opportunity to give the sponsors a feel for your personality. Address the guidelines and question given for the essay, but be original. Too many essays start out with: “I always wanted to fly…”
There is no need to reiterate what your resume or recommendation letters have already addressed. But you must address each of the guidelines somewhere within your package. Things like financial need, achievements, or service to the community are weighed differently for each scholarship. Source

Federal Funding

Federal Student Aid, a part of the U.S. Department of Education, is the largest provider of student financial aid in the nation. At the office of Federal Student Aid, our 1,200 employees help make college education possible for every dedicated mind by providing more than $150 billion in federal grants, loans, and work-study funds each year to more than 15 million students paying for college or career school. dreams. To apply for federal funding, please visit FAFSA link.

Financial Assistance for Veterans

The Post-9/11 GI Bill provides financial support for education and housing to individuals with at least 90 days of aggregate service after September 10, 2001, or individuals discharged with a service-connected disability after 30 days. You must have received an honorable discharge to be eligible for the Post-9/11 GI Bill. For complete information and details, please visit Department of Veterans Affairs.

AVIATOR COLLEGE FINANCING OPTIONS

The United States Department of Education (DOE) has deemed Aviator College eligible to participate in Federal Title IV financial aid programs. This requires the College to adhere to Federal Aid program guidelines and is subject to the availability of funds. The amount of aid a student can receive is based on the cost of attendance,Expected Family Contribution (EFC), enrollment status, and length of attendance. Aviator College uses the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to gather the information needed in determining a student’s financial aid eligibility. All information you provide on a FAFSA is confidential.

Aviator’s SCHOOL CODE is: 039863

For complete list of financing options with Aviator College, contact Aviator Financial Aid office or call 1-800-635-9032

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Options Available To Help You Manage Your Flight Training Cost

Options Available To Help You Manage Your Flight Training CostThere are a lot of variables that affect the cost of learning to fly, including the frequency of flight lessons, weather conditions, the kind of aircraft in which you are training and its availability for scheduling, and individual aptitude. A rough estimate would range between $5,000 and $9,000, depending on the certificate being sought.
One of the greatest deterrents to flying is cost. And realistically, learning to fly can be expensive. But there are several ways to reduce that cost. Flying magazine article gives 5 recommendations on how you can save on flight training cost and make your dream of being a pilot a reality.

  1. Get a sport pilot license. The introduction of the Sport Pilot license gives you an opportunity to become a pilot in a total of 20 hours —half that required for the private pilot license. While the Sport Pilot license has limitations, the certificate still allows you to take a friend up for a flight to any airport in the United States, as long as you have a logbook endorsement to operate in Class B, C and D airspace. And when and if you get the desire and funds to continue your training to get your private pilot certificate, you are already well on your way.
  2. Study. This tip may at first glance appear a little bizarre, but it’s amazing how much money you can save by simply being prepared. Study the concepts for your upcoming lesson thoroughly and go over the required maneuvers in your head. Visualizing the maneuvers stimulates the brain in similar ways as the actual performance of the task. Dr. Richard Restak, a neuroscientist and author of 12 books about the human brain said: “Positron emission tomography (PET) scans reveal that the mental rehearsal of an action activates the prefontal areas of the brain responsible for the formulation of the appropriate motor programs.”You can also study for the written test on your own using a book or programs on-line, rather than taking a class or paying an instructor to teach you. Just make sure that you are learning the most up-to-date information.
  3. Fly as often as you can. During flight training, it is best to fly as often as you can. Piloting skills are perishable, especially in the beginning, and long breaks from flying are likely to degrade your knowledge of the concepts and the skills you’ve developed at significant cost. As a result, you end up spending more time and money re-learning concepts, procedures and aircraft handling skills. Make sure that you minimize interruptions to your training schedule and that you have more than enough money available to complete all the required training before you start.
  4. Research your instructor. Before you commit to a flight instructor, ask yourself or your CFI the following questions: Is this a person I want to spend an absolute minimum of 15 hours with, shoulder-to-shoulder, and many additional hours face-to-face in a classroom? Does this person appear knowledgeable? What syllabus is being used? Will the instructor still be working at the flight school in 6 months? Is he or she applying for airline jobs? Is this person committed to my success as an aviator or more concerned with building time? These are questions that can have a major impact on the final price tag of your flight training. Trust and compatibility between the student and the instructor are essential for productivity in the cockpit and in the classroom.
  5. Buy a flight simulator game. For about the same amount of money as a single flight lesson, you can buy the complete setup for a flight simulator game for use on your home based computer system. And you don’t need a sophisticated computer to do this. You can connect the rudder pedals and yoke, and load the flight simulator software into a simple laptop. While you won’t get the physical sensation of flying, you can use this valuable tool to fine-tune your motor skills and to develop your scan of the instruments. Source
Flight Training Possible With Aviator College Financing Options

To get additional information or details about any of the financing option available contact Aviator College Financial Aid office today.

Title IV Federal Aid

The United States Department of Education (DOE) has deemed Aviator College eligible to participate in Federal Title IV financial aid programs. This requires the College to adhere to Federal Aid program guidelines and is subject to the availability of funds. The amount of aid a student can receive is based on the cost of attendance,Expected Family Contribution (EFC), enrollment status, and length of attendance. Aviator College uses the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to gather the information needed in determining a student’s financial aid eligibility. All information you provide on a FAFSA is confidential.

To receive financial aid from the federal financial aid programs, a student must:
  1. Have a high school diploma or General Education Development (GED) Certificate
  2. Be enrolled or accepted for enrollment as a regular student working toward a degree or certificate in an eligible program. We encourage students to apply at least six to eight weeks in advance of the term you wish to enroll.
  3. Be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen
  4. Have a valid Social Security number
  5. Not be in default on a federal student loan or owe money back on a federal student grant
  6. Register with the Selective Service, if required
  7. Have demonstrated financial need
  8. Make Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)
  9. Not have been convicted for any illegal drug offense while receiving federal financial aid funds
  10. Financial aid must not exceed Cost of Attendance
Private Loans

Aviator College has been approved with PNC Bank and Sallie Mae, to offer Private Educational Loans to our potential and current students.
PNC Bank has been approved to offer the private educational loan for our Associates of Science and Professional Pilot Program. You can apply for the private loan, no more than 90 days before attending Aviator, at http://www.pnconcampus.com. The amount you can request is up to the cost of attendance (COA).
A scholarship is a grant or payment made to support a student’s education, awarded on the basis of academic or other achievement. Aviator has two other scholarship programs available.

The Future Aviator Scholarship is awarded to one Florida high school student per year providing the requirements for the scholarship are met including completing the application and submitting the appropriate paperwork. Click here to apply

The Achievement Scholarship is awarded to current enrolled students providing the requirements for the scholarship are met including completing the application and submitting the appropriate paperwork. Click here to apply

Veterans Benefits

Aviator is approved to offer Chapter 33 (Post 9/11) Benefits Chapter 30 (Montgomery GI Bill) Benefits, and Chapter 31. Aviator College is also approved by the Veteran’s Administration under the GI Bills for both the academic tuition and flight training fees.

To qualify for Chapter 33 (Post 9/11) benefits the following steps are to be completed:

  1. Complete the VonApp at https://www.ebenefits.va.gov.
  2. Complete a change of venue 22-1995 (if you have used benefits in the past)
  3. Send to the Financial Aid Office a copy of your DD214 Member 4.
  4. Send to the Financial Aid Office a copy of your Certificate of Eligibility.

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Veterans Educational and Flight Training Benefits

January 22, 2013 Leave a comment

Veterans Educational and Flight Training Benefits

Post – 9/11 GI Bill

Eligibility: The Post- 9/11 GI Bill is an education benefit program for Servicemembers and Veterans who served on active duty after Sept. 10, 2001. Benefits are payable for training pursued on or after Aug. 1, 2009. No payments can be made under this program for training pursued before that date.

To be eligible, the Servicemember or Veteran must serve at least 90 aggregate days on active duty after Sept. 10, 2001, and remain on active duty or be honorably discharged. Active duty includes active service performed by National Guard members under title 32 U.S.C. for the purposes of organizing, administering, recruiting, instructing, or training the National Guard; or under section 502(f) for the purpose of responding to a national emergency.
Veterans may also be eligible if they were honorably discharged from active duty for a service-connected disability after serving 30 continuous days after Sept. 10, 2001. Generally, Servicemembers or Veterans may receive up to 36 months of entitlement under the Post-9/11 GI Bill.

Eligibility for benefits expires 15 years from the last period of active duty of at least 90 consecutive days. If released for a service-connected disability after at least 30 days of continuous service, eligibility ends 15 years from when the member is released for the service-connected disability.

Flight Training

Flight training is available for such programs as:

  • Rotary wing qualification
  • B747-400 Qualification
  • Dual engine Qualification
  • Flight engineer
Qualification Requirements

In order to qualify, you must have a private pilot’s license and valid medical certification before beginning training. Payments are issued after the training is completed and the school submits your enrollment information to us.
Not available under the Dependents’ Educational Assistance program (Chapter 35).

Payment Amounts

While the participation requirements are the same for all GI Bill programs, the payment amount varies depending on the GI Bill program you are utilizing, and the type of Flight School you are attending. (Payments are issued after the training is completed and the school submits the information to the VA.)

Flight training under Montgomery GI Bill or the Reserve Educational Assistance Program (REAP)
If you are training under the Montgomery GI Bill or REAP we will reimburse you for 60% of the approved charges.

For rates visit Department of Veterans website for more information.

Payments for flight training vary based on which type of flight training course and what kind of school you are enrolled in:

  • If you are enrolled in a degree program that consists of flight training at a public Institution of Higher Learning you can be reimbursed up to the public school in-state cost of the training, and receive a monthly housing allowance and the books and supplies stipend.
  • If you are enrolled in a degree program that consists of flight training at a private Institution of Higher Learning you can be reimbursed up to the full cost of the training or the national maximum (currently $18,077.50) per academic year, whichever is less. You may also receive a monthly housing allowance and the books and supplies stipend. The Yellow Ribbon Program may apply for those enrolled in degree programs. Click here to learn more and see if your school participates.
  • If you are enrolled in a vocational flight training program you can be reimbursed the lesser of (1) the full cost of training or (2) the annual maximum amount (click here to see the annual maximum amount) in effect the day you began training in your flight course. You will not receive a housing allowance or the books and supplies stipend. The maximum amount available for reimbursement depends on the academic year you begin training.

For example, if you enroll in a dual-engine certification course that costs $15,000 on November 1, 2012. You can receive a maximum of $10,330 for that course and any other flight training (programs leading to your dual-engine certification, or other certification) that begin before August 1, 2013. Additional flight training courses that begin on or after August 1, 2013 will be subject to a new annual limit. Remember, these amounts could be further limited by your eligibility percentage.

Types of Training Available:
  • Courses at colleges and universities leading to associate, bachelor or graduate degrees, including accredited independent study offered through distance education.
  • Courses leading to a certificate or diploma from business, technical or vocational schools.
  • Apprenticeship or on-the-job training for those not on active duty, including self-employment training begun on or after June 16, 2004, for ownership or operation of a franchise
  • Correspondence courses, under certain conditions.
  • Flight training, if the Veteran holds a private pilot’s license upon beginning the training and meets the medical requirements.
  • State-approved teacher certification programs.
  • Preparatory courses necessary for admission to a college or graduate school.
  • License and certification tests approved for Veterans.
  • Entrepreneurship training courses to create or expand small businesses.
  • Tuition assistance using MGIB as “Top-Up” (active duty servicemembers).
  • Accelerated payments for certain high-cost programs are authorized.
Aviator College Approved for Chapter 33 and 30 Benefits

Aviator College is approved by the Veteran’s Administration under the GI Bills for both academic tuition and flight training fees. Prospective student who performed active duty after September 10, 2001 have additional eligibility for funding. Read about the new VA benefit in a letter from the Director of VA Education Services http://www.gibill.va.gov/documents/CH33_veteran_outreach_letter.pdf.

Due to complexity and paperwork required please contact Amy Roth, or call at 772-466-4822.

VA Students enrolling will need to register in the VA website http://www.gibill.va.gov. Fill out form VONAPP. If you have used your VA benefits before or prior you will also have to fill out the form 22-1995 Also you will need to bring a copy DD2-14.

All pilots must now present a valid passport or birth certificate upon arrival. For any additional information please contact our Financial Aid Department.

Aviator College is a Participant in the Yellow Ribbon Program

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Aviation Scholarships and Grants for Flight Training College Students

December 3, 2012 Leave a comment

Aviation Scholarships and Grants for Flight Training College StudentsA degree in aviation opens the door to many career opportunities and shows a high level of commitment to the aviation field. There are a variety of jobs for the professionals who hold this degree. Many colleges throughout the world offer degrees such as bachelor of aviation science or associates of aviation science. Stand alone these degrees do not qualify for any profession without your commercial pilot license (CPL) but make a good starting point if you want to do a masters degree in aviation. Also they look very good on your resume and may be a door opener when applying for a job.

Many airlines, especially in the United States, prefer applicants with a college degree.
Flight training can be expensive and the chances are you are going to need financing for your flight training education. There are many ways to get financing: government loans, private institutions like banks and credit unions. In addition, other sources of financial aid can be colleges and many aviation associations. Below we have compiled a guide for the prospective flight training students to make an informed decision.

Government Loans

FAFSA is short for Free Application for Federal Student Aid – it is the first step in the government loan process for your flight career. Use it to apply for federal student financial aid, such as the Pell Grant, student loans, and college work-study. Most states and schools use FAFSA information to award their financial aid. Visit their website for more information. If you are a veteran go directly to the Department of Veteran Affairs website.

A great source for information on aviation scholarships is Federal Aviation Administration. Please visit FAA website for details.

Aviation and Scholarships

Johnny Davis Scholarship

Named in memory of Johnny Davis. Available to high school seniors, and/or college students who plan to or are attending an accredited school in an avionics or aircraft repair program.

Eligibility: High school seniors and/or college students
For further details visit online
More information:

Joshua Esch Mitchell Scholarship Fund

Joshua Esch Mitchell Aviation Scholarship
For students pursuing studies in the field of professional pilot with an emphasis on general aviation, flight engineer, or airway science.

Eligibility: US citizens enrolled in a full or part-time program at a college or university in the US providing an accredited flight science curriculum. All applicants must have a minimum cumulative grade point of 2.75 and be entering the second year (or above) in college.

For further details visit online
Contact: 161 Ottawa Ave NW Suite 209-C, Grand Rapids MI 49503-2757
Phone: 616 454-1751 x 103
Email: rbishop@grfoundtion
Cash award: $500-$2000
More information:

Aircraft Electronics Association

Available to high school seniors, and/or college students who plan to or are attending an accredited school in an avionics or aircraft repair program.

Eligibility: Available to high school seniors, and/or college students who plan to or are attending an accredited school in an avionics or aircraft repair program
More information: http://www.aea.net/educationalfoundation

Air Line Pilots Association

Air Line Pilots Association Scholarship Program
One 4-year undergraduate college scholarship is awarded each year. The total monetary value is $12,000 with $3,000 disbursed annually to the recipient for four consecutive years, provided that adequate academic standing is maintained (3.0 GPA).

Eligible applicants are sons or daughters of medically retired, long-term disabled or deceased pilot members of the Air Line Pilots Association.
Contact: 535 Herndon Parkway, Herndon, VA 20170
Cash award: $12,000 ($3,000 annually)
More information:

University Aviation Association (UAA)

A professional association and unifying voice for promoting and furthering aviation education as a collegiate academic discipline. Their mission

To promote and foster excellence in collegiate aviation education by providing a forum for students, faculty, staff and practitioners to share ideas, to enhance the quality of education, and to develop stronger programs and curricula. To influence aviation education policy at all governmental levels. To provide and nurture the linkage between college aviation education, the aviation industry, and government agencies.

UAA Scholarships

Joseph Frasca Excellence in Aviation Scholarship
Deadline: April 9, 2013

Eugene S. Kropf Scholarship
Deadline: May 31, 2012

Paul A. Whelan Scholarship
Deadline: May 15, 2012

Dr. Paul W. DeVore Freedom of Flight Aviation Scholarship
Deadline: TBA

UAA Author’s Scholarship
Deadline: TBA

For UAA Administered or Affiliated Organizations Scholarships visit their website.

Aviator College Financing

Preparing for college takes planning and organization. Paying for college usually requires some kind of financial aid. Students enrolled with Aviator College may be eligible for Federal Financial Aid, Veterans Benefits, and Private Career Education Loans.

High school seniors in the last semester of school must fill out a FAFSA to determine eligibility for financial aid. For those who qualify, the federal financial aid programs listed on the Financial Aid tab are available to any U.S. citizen or permanent U.S. resident who is admitted to the College and has filed the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). To speak to the Financial Aid Administrator or Veterans Programs Administrator, call Amy Roth at 772-466-4822.

Veterans Benefits

Approved for Post 9/11 Chapter 33 Benefits – Full funding available for tuition and flight training.

Flight Training Academy Financing

Private Educational Loans are available for all of the programs offered at Aviator Academy. The relationships we have established with our lenders offer our students the best suitable financial assistance for their individual needs

Aviator is accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC). We are approved by the Federal Department of Education to offer low interest Federal Student Loans to students who qualify. These loans are available for students enrolled in our Professional Pilot Program, Commercial Pilot Program, and Veterans Professional Pilot Program.

The Federal Family Education Loan Plus (FFELP) is available for dependent students under 24 years of age. Parents can apply for full funding for flight training at low federal interest rates. You must submit an application for enrollment to Aviator before applying for federal financial aid. If you have additional questions contact our Financial Aid Department (772-466-4822) or Email.

To obtain more information about Private Educational Loans and Federal Student Loans, please contact our Financial Aid Administrator. For quick and easy loan approval, please complete the Loan Request Form below. You will be contacted by our Financial Aid Administrator via email or phone.

To apply for this funding:

Scholarship Application

Please click on the Link to the Scholarship application you would like to download.

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Accreditation, FAA Certification and BBB Rating for Flight Schools or Aviation Colleges

Accreditation, FAA Certification and BBB Rating for Flight Schools or Aviation CollegesIn the United States more than 230 two- and four-year colleges offer non-engineering aviation degrees. Many of them offer the same degrees, but no two are alike. Each of them offers a number of similar but variable options to their degree programs, and not all of them offer the same degrees, which makes the selection of the school that’s “just right for you” all the more difficult.

To increase your chances of finding a flight school that meets all of your specific needs and requirements, a thorough research is necessary. Because your education plays such an important part in determining your future, the process of selecting a college or university should be meticulous, thorough, and pragmatic. Before you can find what you want, you must know exactly what you need. In addition to most common factors such as location, degree programs available and quality of instructors, consider the following factors in your search for a good flight school.

Accreditation and Licensing

For 45 years, the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC) has been at the forefront of establishing and advancing quality education at private, postsecondary schools and colleges.
As a recognized accrediting agency, ACCSC is dedicated to ensuring a quality education for 250,000 students who annually pursue career education at 800 accredited institutions.

FAA Certification

There are two types of schools. One is normally referred to as an “FAA-approved school” and the other as a “non-approved school.” Enrollment in an FAA-approved school usually ensures a high quality of training. FAA-approved schools meet prescribed standards with respect to equipment, facilities, personnel, and curricula. However, many excellent pilot schools find it impractical to qualify for the FAA certification, and are referred to as non-approved schools. One of the differences between FAA-approved schools and non-approved schools is that fewer flight hours are required to qualify for a pilot certificate in an FAA-approved school. The requirement for a private pilot certificate is 40 hours in a non-approved school, and 35 hours in an approved school. However, since most people require 60 to 75 hours of training, this difference may be insignificant for a private pilot certificate.

Titles IV Loans Approved Schools

A Title IV loan is a term used to describe several types of student loans. This includes the federal financial aid programs Unsubsidized Federal Stafford loan, Federal Pell Grants, Federal Perkins Loans, Federal Supplement Education Opportunity Grant and Federal PLUS loans. Students who are undergraduates or graduate students enrolled in postsecondary education may qualify to receive these loan programs to pay for their education. Each loan has slightly different qualifications and criteria to meet.

Chapter 33 (Post 9/11) Benefits & Chapter 30 (Montgomery Bill) Approved Colleges

The Department of Veterans Affairs administers a variety of education benefit programs. Many Veterans and active duty personnel can qualify for more than one education benefits program, including the:

  • The Post-9/11 GI Bill
  • Montgomery GI Bill – Active Duty (MGIB-AD)
  • Montgomery GI Bill – Selected Reserve (MGIB-SR)
  • Reserve Educational Assistance Program (REAP)
  • Veterans Educational Assistance Program (VEAP)
  • Educational Assistance Test Program (Section 901)
  • Survivors’ and Dependents’ Educational Assistance Program (DEA)
  • National Call to Service Program

While the participation requirements are the same for all GI Bill programs, the payment amount varies depending on the GI Bill program you are utilizing, and the type of Flight School you are attending. (Payments are issued after the training is completed and the school submits the information to the VA.)

Under the Post-9/11 GI Bill
If you are enrolled in any degree program that consists of flight training at a public Institution of Higher Learning you can be reimbursed up to the resident in-state cost of the training and will be eligible to receive your housing allowance and the books & supplies stipend.
If you are enrolled in any degree program that consists of flight training at a private Institution of Higher Learning you can be reimbursed up to the full cost of the training or the national maximum per academic year, whichever is less. You will also be eligible to receive your housing allowance and the books & supplies stipend.
If you are enrolled in any type of vocational flight training you can be reimbursed up to the full cost of training or $10,000 per academic year, whichever is less, you WILL NOT receive the housing allowance or books & supplies stipend.

The Yellow Ribbon Program may apply for those enrolled in degree programs. An academic year lasts from August 1 to July 31.

BBA Listings and Approval Rating

BBB ensures that high standards for trust are set and maintained. We exist so consumers and businesses alike have an unbiased source to guide them on matters of trust. We provide educational information and expert advice that is free of charge and easily accessible. BBB Accreditation is an honor – and not every company is eligible. Businesses that meet our high standards are invited to join BBB. Businesses meeting BBB standards are presented to local Boards of Directors (or designees) for review and acceptance as a BBB Accredited Business. All BBB accredited businesses have agreed to live up to our Standards for Trust. Our Standards for Trust are a comprehensive set of policies, procedures and best practices focused on how businesses should treat the public – fairly and honestly in all circumstances. Search for a flight school that has a good BBB Rating.

Accreditation and Licensing For Aviator College

Licensed by the State of Florida Commission For Independent Education License #4155. Aviator Flight Training Academy is a Division of Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology, which is licensed by the State of Florida Commission for Independent Education and Accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges.

FAA Certified

All flight training courses at Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology are certified by the FAA Certificate # BEJS028K.

State of Florida Licensed

Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology is licensed by the State of Florida to offer a degree program, license #4155.

Accreditation

Aviator College is accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools, and Colleges (ACCSC).

Title IV Approved

The Federal Department of Education has approved Aviator College to administer Title IV funds in the form of FFEL Loans, Direct Loans, PELL Grants and more.

BBB A Rating

Aviator College has earned an “A” rating” with the United States Better Business Bureau

Contact Aviator College

Online
PHONE: 1-800-635-9032 (Toll free number)
Schedule a visit
Associate Degree in Aviation Online Enrollment

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Career Education Loan to Cover Flight Training Tuition and Fees

Career Education Loan to Cover Flight Training Tuition and FeesThere are a number of ways to get financing for your aviation school training. Most students apply for government loans whether they are veterans or not. There are many banking institutions that will provide assistance so you can make your dream of becoming a pilot a reality.

What’s the difference between a federal student loan and a private student loan?

Federal student loans have fixed interest rates and may include federally subsidized interest. Additionally, they have many flexible repayment and deferment options. Federal Stafford, PLUS and consolidation loans are now available solely from the Direct Loan program.

Private student loans, like the Chase Select loan, are designed to supplement federal loans when federal loans and other aid aren’t enough to cover the entire cost of your education. You should always consider exhausting your federal aid, grants or student loan options before applying for a private student loan.

Federal student loans are available to students and parents to help pay for college. They have fixed interest rates and may include federally subsidized interest. Additionally, they have many flexible repayment and deferment options. Federal Stafford, PLUS and consolidation loans are now available solely from the U.S. Department of Education’s Direct Loan program.

In order to apply for federal student aid, you must first fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). After your FAFSA is processed, your school will review the results and tell you the amount and types of financial aid you are eligible to receive.

Types of federal student loans include:

  • Federal Direct Subsidized Stafford Loans
  • Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans
  • Federal Direct PLUS loans (for parents and graduate or professional students)
  • Federal Direct Consolidation Loans
  • Federal Perkins Loans

For more information about federal student loans:

Contact your school’s financial aid office or visit http://www.studentaid.ed.gov, the U.S. Department of Education’s website about funding education beyond high school.

Visit  FAFSA for full information.

As one of the largest banks in the country, PNC is dedicated to helping you advance your education.

The PNC Solution Loan

  • Choose your interest rate option: variable or fixed rate
  • No application or origination fees
  • Get 0.50% off your rate with automated payments from your checking or savings
  • account1
  • A co-signer release option is available after the initial 48 consecutive on-time
  • monthly payments2
  • Receive a preliminary decision within minutes of applying online
  • Payments can be deferred while enrolled at least half time, or you may choose to
  • begin paying immediately to save on interest expense3
  • Take up to 15 years to repay3

Before you apply for loans, you should have:

  • completed and sent in your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) as soon as possible after January 1st
  • received an award letter from the school you plan to attend
  • researched grants, scholarships, federal loans, and work-study programs
Undergraduate Private Loan

Who It’s For: Undergraduate students who are enrolled at least half time in a degree program

Graduate/Professional Private Loan

Who It’s For: Graduate or professional students who are enrolled at least half time in a degree program

Career Education Loans

Aviator College’s Degree Program & Airline Professional Pilot Program are approved for a Private Loan that will cover tuition and flight fees.

Contact our Financial Aid Department for more information and processing for your loans.

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Aviation College Grants For Your Flight Training Education

Aviation College Grants For Your Flight Training EducationDemand for professional pilots is expected to grow at an average of 1% per year through the year 2020, with regional airlines predicted to have the best career opportunities.

Aviation schools offer training for a variety of exciting careers in the aviation industry. Whether you want to pursue a career as an aircraft pilot, an aircraft electronics specialist, an air traffic controller, or some other specialty, there are a range of flight schools to choose from, both on college campuses, and online. When you’ve completed your training, you’ll be ready to enter a growing job market in a thriving industry – and you’ll also be in line for a career that promises to be financially rewarding.

Aviation is a very achievable goal. One of the biggest factors that prevent the dream from happening is the expense of aviation education. Although flight training cost can be expensive and time consuming, the choices flight training students make can reduce the flight training costs and will not deter them from making their dream of becoming a pilot a reality.

Applying for grants can help to defray these costs, and, unlike loans, you do not need to repay a grant.

Federal Grants

Students enrolled in accredited programs can apply for two grants offered by the U.S. government. Depending on how much a student’s family can contribute financially, the government can award a Pell Grant that provides between $400 to $4,050. Future pilots can also apply for Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants, which the government can award in amounts ranging from $100 to $4,000 per year. Both grants require that students enroll on a minimum half-time basis and that evaluators award both grants based on a student’s financial need. To receive consideration for either of these grants, you must first file a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

Pell Grants

For those interested in learning how to fly through an accredited college or university, there are federal Pell Grants available. The application process is done either through the government website, or through the university or college’s bursar’s office. Pell Grants can be used to further your aviation career and gain a pilot’s license. The Pell Grants are awarded through the U.S. Department of Education (see Resources).

U.S. Department of Education
Federal Student Aid

8930 Ward Parkway
Kansas City, MO 64114
319-337-5665
fafsa.ed.gov

Individual Flight Schools

When you begin looking to start flying, you will be shopping for flight schools. Ask them if they offer any sort of in-house grants or scholarships. Aviator is accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC). We are approved by the Federal Department of Education to offer low interest Federal Student Loans to students who qualify. These loans are available for students enrolled in our Professional Pilot Program, Commercial Pilot Program, and Veterans Professional Pilot Program.

Women in Aviation

Because women make up only 6 percent of the 600,000 active pilots in the U.S., Women in Aviation seeks to encourage women aviators by awarding yearly grants to future female pilots. The application procedure includes an essay, enrollment in a school and membership in this organization.

Women in Aviation, International
Morningstar Airport
3647 State Route 503 South
West Alexandria, OH 45381-9354
937-839-4647
wai.org

Organization of Black Aerospace Professionals

The Organization of Black Aerospace Professionals offers scholarships to minority students seeking to obtain a commercial pilot license. Award amounts vary, with the average grantee receiving $1,000.

Organization of Black Aerospace Professionals
1 Westbrook Corporate Center
Suite 300
Westchester, IL 60154
800-JET-OBAP
obap.org

National Gay Pilot Association Grant

The National Gay Pilot Association Grant provides funding for future pilots enrolled in professional flight or aviation training programs at colleges, technical schools and government-approved commercial and private flight schools. While you do not need to identify yourself as gay or lesbian to apply, the grant evaluators give special consideration to people who are gay or lesbian.

National Gay Pilot Association
PO Box 7271
Dallas, TX 75209-0271
214-336-0873
ngpa.org

National Air Transport Association

Students pursuing a career as a general aviator (rather than a commercial airline pilot) can apply for one of the two yearly grants offered by the National Air Transport Association. Each grant is $2,500, and students who achieve academic excellence can renew that grant for a second year.

National Air Transport Association Foundation
4226 King St.
Alexandria, VA 22302
703-845-9000
nata.aero

International Organization of Women Pilots

The International Organization of Women Pilots (also known as the “ninety-nines”) provides grants to current and future female pilots. Current pilots seeking additional certification (in other aircraft or aircraft types) can apply for the Amelia Earhart Memorial Scholarship. Students enrolled in flight school who are not licensed pilots can apply for the New Pilot Award, which provides up to $1,500. To apply for either grant, you must join this organization.

The International Organization of Women Pilots
4300 Amelia Earhart Road
Oklahoma City, OK 73159
800-994-1929
ninety-nines.org

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