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Posts Tagged ‘glass cockpit’

Glass Cockpit Flight Training

Glass Cockpit Flight TrainingA glass cockpit is an aircraft cockpit that features electronic (digital) instrument displays, typically large LCD screens, rather than the traditional style of analog dials and gauges. While a traditional cockpit relies on numerous mechanical gauges to display information, a glass cockpit uses several displays driven by flight management systems, that can be adjusted to display flight information as needed. This simplifies aircraft operation and navigation and allows pilots to focus only on the most pertinent information. They are also popular with airline companies as they usually eliminate the need for a flight engineer. In recent years the technology has become widely available in small aircraft.

Improving Safety In Glass Cockpits

By Tim Decker

During the last eight years, the majority of GA aircraft, including Cessna, Cirrus, Diamond, Mooney and Piper, have switched from traditional analog cockpit instrumentation to glass cockpits. Many older aircraft are being retrofit with modern avionics that include IFR-approved GPS units, autopilots, primary flight displays (PFDs) and multifunction displays (MFDs), which give many of the same safety advantages that glass cockpits offer. However, a recent NTSB study concluded that glass-cockpit aircraft were no safer than conventional instrumented aircraft.

Disadvantages of traditional analog instrumentation are the multitudes of mechanical components: gyroscopes, delicate flywheels, gimbals, seals and motors. Diaphragms, tubes, gears, springs, pins, needles, pointers and housings make up other mechanical instruments. Gyroscopes lose accuracy during flight, and mechanical components wear out. Frequently repairing or replacing analog instruments is expensive.

One principal advantage of glass cockpits is the elimination of these delicate mechanical components. Instead, solid-state electronics found in glass cockpits are more reliable and less prone to wear and degradation because of normal aircraft operations.

The close grouping of the traditional “six pack” (airspeed, attitude, altimeter, turn & bank, heading, vertical speed) into a single display in a glass cockpit makes for a faster and more efficient cross-check. The addition of GPS, weather, airspace and traffic information adds to the pilot’s situational awareness and increases safety. All this is terrific, but a phenomenal improvement to safety that comes with glass is the solid-state Attitude Heading Reference System (AHRS), which is exponentially more reliable and accurate than vacuum-pump-driven attitude and heading systems.

The many advantages of glass come at a cost other than money: time. Time is required for training in order to develop proficiency. The NTSB recommendation for training on specific equipment is critical to realize the safety potential of glass cockpits.

A VFR pilot transitioning from steam gauges to glass needs to be comfortable with quickly finding and processing the traditional six-pack instrument indications, as well as engine, communication and navigation information on the PFD and MFD. An IFR pilot requires the same, plus an excellent understanding of how to use navigation and autopilot functions.

Without familiarization training, a simple change of a radio or navigation frequency can cause confusion, distract the pilot and take longer than using a stand-alone radio in a traditional cockpit. Entering a flight plan in the GPS and knowing how to quickly add or delete points in-flight require more training, and is essential for safe flight, especially in busy airspace or deteriorating weather conditions.

For the instrument pilot, an ATC clearance to intercept a Victor airway from an assigned heading is fairly simple using conventional instruments—tune the VOR frequency, dial the airway course, stay on heading until the VOR needle centers and then turn to keep the needle centered. Doing this same task using an IFR-approved GPS can be just as simple, but requires a completely different set of steps to accomplish—highlight the second waypoint of the intercept airway on the GPS flight-plan page, press the Direct button twice and press Enter to accept the “Fly leg X to Y?” message (Garmin 430/530/1000). Additional training is required in order to make the autopilot fly this autonomously, even though it’s very similar to autopilot intercept of VOR course (instead of GPS course).

Is the glass-cockpit training worth it? Definitely! Flying a conventionally equipped aircraft with a vacuum-driven attitude indicator and only dual VORs and possibly DME in hard instrument conditions is difficult and limits useful information available. A PFD and MFD combination displaying a moving map, terrain, weather and traffic information increases situational awareness tremendously. The added benefits of more reliable equipment is icing on the cake.

For pilots considering an upgrade to a glass cockpit who want to reap the numerous advantages of modern avionics, there are numerous training options. Many suppliers provide Internet-downloaded trainers free of charge, and there are free online interactive courses. Commercial DVDs and simulator training are extremely useful, too. Most importantly—realistic flight training using the specific system in busy airspace during less-than-ideal weather with an experienced glass-cockpit flight instructor is a must.

Aviator Best Fleet Available For Your Flight Training

The Aviator fleet is made up of multi-engine and single-engine aircraft. The primary aircraft used in our training programs are the Beechcraft BE-76 Duchess, Piper Warrior III PA-128, and the Cessna 172 Skyhawk, all are well known as training aircraft the world over. Our fleet also includes a Piper Arrow and a J-3 Cub. All aircraft are maintained in our maintenance facilities located here at the St. Lucie County International Airport. We average more than 35,000 hours of flight time per year. They are all equipped for VFR and IFR flight per FAR 91.205 (except the J-3 Cub which is VFR Day only).

Beechcraft BE-76 Duchess

The Beechcraft Duchess, also known at the BE-76, was designed as a general aviation, light twin training aircraft. A little sister to the Beechcraft Baron, the Duchess was chosen by Aviator as our multi-engine training aircraft because of the durability built into the product by Beechcraft. All of the Duchess aircraft at Aviator are equipped for instrument operations with an HSI and a VOR; many of the aircraft also have an ADF. Because the future is area navigation (RNAV), we have multiple aircraft equipped with Garmin 430 GPS systems. Having a broad range of learning options is the best way to help ensure future employment. The Duchess fleet is currently being upgraded to ASPEN glass cockpits. Several aircraft are equipped with weather radar and/or lightning strike detectors.
Cessna 172 Skyhawk

The Cessna 172 is the most widely used primary training aircraft in the world. Aviator uses the Cessna for private pilot and single engine training with Garmin EFIS Systems.

Piper Warrior III PA – 128

Aviator College welcomes it’s new fleet of Piper Warrior III airplanes equipped with Avadyne EFIS Systems.

Maintenance

Aviator has its own in-house maintenance facility, a 13,000 square foot environmentally approved hangar. Maintenance is under the supervision of the FAA. All technicians hold Airplane & Powerplant Certificates or better. Maintenance is open six days a week.

Contact Aviator
Schedule a Visit

Distributed by Viestly

New Piper Aircraft Added to Aviator Fleet

January 11, 2013 Leave a comment

New Piper Aircraft Added to Aviator FleetFor student pilots, you never forget the first airplane you fly. No matter how many other aircraft you may pilot, that first trainer will always have a special place in your heart and your logbook. When you choose your flight school, it is important to review the flight training equipment and the way maintenance is handled at the flight school of your choice.

Piper Aircraft

Piper Aircraft, Inc. is headquartered in Vero Beach, Florida. A global force in aviation, Piper is an investment of the Ministry of Finance of the Government of Brunei. The company offers efficient single-engine and twin-engine trainer, personal and business aircraft. With economical acquisition and operating costs, Piper airplanes deliver the best value available today and into the future. Piper is a member of the General Aviation Manufacturers Association.
In October 2012 Piper unveiled the improved Premier Elegance interior collection for its top-of-the-line aircraft at the National Business Aviation Association’s 65th Annual Meeting and Convention.

The Premier Elegance package features decorative soft goods with four new interior décor color options including the dramatic new Glacier, which features porcelain leather seating, IZIT leather ermine pearl side panels and a beautiful black textured loop pile Cotswald Exeter carpet. Additionally, the Premier Elegance interior cockpit décor now incorporates a matte black finish on the cockpit avionics panel that is much easier on the pilot’s eyes.
The Premier Elegance package is standard on the single-engine Piper Meridian turboprop and will be offered as an option for the single-engine piston powered Matrix and Mirage aircraft beginning in January 2013. Piper will display the Dune color palette in a mockup of the Meridian on exhibit just outside the main entrance to the Orlando Convention Center, site of the NBAA meeting.

“We are excited about these improvements to our signature M-Class lineup of efficient and economical single-engine aircraft,” said Piper Head of Global Sales and Business Development Drew McEwen. “Following the significant cabin improvements announced last year at NBAA the M-Class series now boasts tremendous comfort and luxury.”

The M-Class improvements announced last year included enhancements for both pilot and passenger comfort, including ease of cockpit access, brighter external LED lighting, better cabin and cockpit sound, improved electrical service and greater air distribution.

SOURCE

Aviator Flight Training Academy Aircraft & Maintenance

Our fleet consists of 14 multi-engine and 12 single engine aircraft
The Aviator fleet is made up of multi-engine and single-engine aircraft. The primary aircraft used in our training programs are the Beechcraft BE-76 Duchess and the Cessna 172 Skyhawk, both well known as training aircraft the world over. Our fleet also includes a Piper Arrow and a J-3 Cub. All aircraft are maintained in our maintenance facilities located here at the St. Lucie County International Airport. We average more than 35,000 hours of flight time per year. They are all equipped for VFR and IFR flight per FAR 91.205 (except the J-3 Cub which is VFR Day only).

Beechcraft BE-76 Duchess

The Beechcraft Duchess, also known at the BE-76, was designed as a general aviation, light twin training aircraft. A little sister to the Beechcraft Baron, the Duchess was chosen by Aviator as our multi-engine training aircraft because of the durability built into the product by Beechcraft. All of the Duchess aircraft at Aviator are equipped for instrument operations with an HSI and a VOR; many of the aircraft also have an ADF. Because the future is area navigation (RNAV), we have multiple aircraft equipped with Garmin 430 GPS systems. Having a broad range of learning options is the best way to help ensure future employment. The Duchess fleet is currently being upgraded to ASPEN glass cockpits. Several aircraft are equipped with weather radar and/or lightning strike detectors.

Cessna 172 Skyhawk

The Cessna 172 is the most widely used primary training aircraft in the world. Aviator uses the Cessna for private pilot and single engine training.

Maintenance

Aviator has its own in-house maintenance facility, a 13,000 square foot environmentally approved hangar. Maintenance is under the supervision of the FAA. All technicians hold Airplane & Powerplant Certificates or better. Maintenance is open six days a week.
* Aircraft are used for flight training only
NO AIRCRAFT RENTALS ARE OFFERED

New Piper Aircraft Added to Aviator Fleet

Our second set of Piper aircraft equipped with Avidyne Entegra Electronic Flight Instrument Systems has arrived! Aviator College is expecting one last delivery of these planes before June. Once we receive our last set, our fleet will have gained a total of 10 new Piper aircraft equipped with Avidyne Entegra Electronic Flight Instrument Systems. The purpose of expanding our fleet is to prepare our pilots in training with the equipment which will most resemble what they will experience during their career.

Aviator Flight Training Academy offers professional pilot training programs with a minimum of 200 hours of multi-engine time. The flight school has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator), large classrooms and individual briefing rooms.

ENROLL NOW FOR WINTER CLASSES

CONTACT AVIATOR COLLEGE

Phone (772) 672-8222
Toll Free 1-800-635-9032

Distributed by Viestly

Glass Cockpit Planes For Pilot Training

December 7, 2012 Leave a comment

Glass Cockpit Planes For Pilot TrainingA glass cockpit is an aircraft cockpit that features electronic (digital) instrument displays, typically large LCD screens, rather than the traditional style of analog dials and gauges. While a traditional cockpit relies on numerous mechanical gauges to display information, a glass cockpit uses several displays driven by flight management systems, that can be adjusted to display flight information as needed. This simplifies aircraft operation and navigation and allows pilots to focus only on the most pertinent information. They are also popular with airline companies as they usually eliminate the need for a flight engineer. In recent years the technology has become widely available in small aircraft.

As aircraft displays have modernized, the sensors that feed them have modernized as well. Traditional gyroscopic flight instruments have been replaced by electronic Altitude and Heading Reference Systems (AHRSes) and Air Data Computers (ADCs), improving reliability and reducing cost and maintenance. GPS receivers are usually integrated into glass cockpits.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) initiated this study to determine if the transition to glass cockpits in light aircraft has improved the safety record of those aircraft.

Introduction of Glass Cockpit Avionics into Light Aircraft

NTSB Number SS-10/01
NTIS Number PB2010-917001
source link

Three different approaches were used in this study. First, a retrospective statistical analysis of manufacturer records, aircraft investigation information, and activity survey data was conducted to compare the accident experience of recently manufactured light single-engine airplanes equipped and not equipped with glass cockpit displays. Second, an evaluation of glass cockpit training requirements and resources was conducted to characterize the training and to identify areas for potential safety improvement. Finally, accident cases were reviewed to identify emerging safety issues associated with the introduction of glass cockpit displays into this class of aircraft.

The statistical analysis found that for 2002–2008, light single-engine aircraft equipped with glass cockpit displays experienced lower total accident rates—but higher fatal accident rates—than the same type of aircraft equipped with conventional analog instrumentation. Accidents involving glass cockpit aircraft were more likely to be associated with personal/business flights, longer flights, instrument flight plans, and single-pilot operations, while accidents involving conventional analog cockpit aircraft were more likely to be associated with instructional flights, shorter flights, and two-pilot operations. Accident pilots flying glass cockpit equipped aircraft were found to have higher levels of pilot certification and more total flight experience than those flying conventional aircraft.

The evaluation of light aircraft glass cockpit training requirements found that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been updating training handbooks and test standards to incorporate generic information about electronic flight instrument displays. However, current airman knowledge written tests (such as private pilot, instrument rating, commercial pilot, and flight instructor certificates) do not assess pilots’ knowledge of the functionality of glass cockpit displays. In addition, the FAA has no specific training requirements for pilots operating glass cockpit-equipped light aircraft. The lack of equipment-specific training requirements from the FAA results in a wide range of initial and recurrent training experiences among pilots of glass cockpit aircraft. With the exception of training provided by airframe manufacturers with the purchase of a new aircraft, pilots must currently seek out and obtain equipment-specific glass cockpit training on their own.

The review of accidents involving light aircraft equipped with glass cockpits found that pilots’ experiences and training in conventional cockpits do not prepare them to safely operate the complex and varied glass cockpit systems being installed in light aircraft today. Further, the lack of information provided to pilots about glass cockpit systems may lead them to misunderstand or misinterpret system failures. As a result, there is a need for new training procedures and tools to ensure that pilots are adequately prepared to safely operate aircraft equipped with glass cockpit avionics.

The results of this study suggest that the introduction of glass cockpits has not resulted in a measurable improvement in safety when compared to similar aircraft with conventional instruments. The analyses conducted during the study identified safety issues in two areas:

The need for pilots to have sufficient equipment-specific knowledge and proficiency to safely operate aircraft equipped with glass cockpit avionics.
The need to capture maintenance and operational information in order to assess the reliability of glass cockpit avionics in light aircraft.

As a result of this safety study, the NTSB made six recommendations to the FAA: five address training requirements and one addresses reporting requirements.

Glass Cockpit Planes From Aviator College

To meet the new demands of airlines and enhance pilot training, Aviator College has begun an expansion of its all “glass” cockpit planes. The college has just received its first delivery of Piper aircraft equipped with Avidyne Entegra Electronic Flight Instrument Systems, with a second delivery expected in late December. Our ultimate goal is to have our entire fleet equipped with all “glass” instrument systems.

Flight Training Aircraft & Maintenance

Our fleet consists of 14 multi-engine and 12 single engine aircraft
The Aviator fleet is made up of multi-engine and single-engine aircraft. The primary aircraft used in our training programs are the Beechcraft BE-76 Duchess and the Cessna 172 Skyhawk, both well known as training aircraft the world over. Our fleet also includes a Piper Arrow and a J-3 Cub. All aircraft are maintained in our maintenance facilities located here at the St. Lucie County International Airport. We average more than 35,000 hours of flight time per year. They are all equipped for VFR and IFR flight per FAR 91.205 (except the J-3 Cub which is VFR Day only).

Beechcraft BE-76 Duchess

The Beechcraft Duchess, also known at the BE-76, was designed as a general aviation, light twin training aircraft. A little sister to the Beechcraft Baron, the Duchess was chosen by Aviator as our multi-engine training aircraft because of the durability built into the product by Beechcraft. All of the Duchess aircraft at Aviator are equipped for instrument operations with an HSI and a VOR; many of the aircraft also have an ADF. Because the future is area navigation (RNAV), we have multiple aircraft equipped with Garmin 430 GPS systems. Having a broad range of learning options is the best way to help ensure future employment. The Duchess fleet is currently being upgraded to ASPEN glass cockpits. Several aircraft are equipped with weather radar and/or lightning strike detectors.

Cessna 172 Skyhawk

The Cessna 172 is the most widely used primary training aircraft in the world. Aviator uses the Cessna for private pilot and single engine training.

Maintenance

Aviator has its own in-house maintenance facility, a 13,000 square foot environmentally approved hangar. Maintenance is under the supervision of the FAA. All technicians hold Airplane & Powerplant Certificates or better. Maintenance is open six days a week.

* Aircraft are used for flight training only
NO AIRCRAFT RENTALS ARE OFFERED

Contact Aviator
Enroll Now
Schedule a Visit

Distributed by Viestly