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Are You Ready To Begin Flight Training

Are You Ready To Begin Flight TrainingCareer pilot is as challenging as it is rewarding. Like any other field, aviation has many paths to offer and all depends on what long term goals you want to achieve. Your choice of a flight school might depend on whether you are planning to obtain a sport pilot certificate, recreational pilot certificate, private pilot certificate, or whether you intend to pursue a career as a professional pilot.

Another consideration is whether you will train part time or full time. Do not make the mistake of making your determination based on financial concerns alone. The quality of training you receive is very important. Prior to making a final decision, visit the school you are considering, and talk with management, instructors, and students. Evaluate the items on the checklist you developed, and then take time to think things over before making your decision.

Ground and flight training should be obtained as regularly and frequently as possible. This assures maximum retention of instruction and the achievement of requisite proficiency.

The Role of the Instructor

The student pilot’s training program depends upon the quality of the ground and flight training received. A flight instructor should possess an understanding of the learning process, a knowledge of the fundamentals of teaching, and the ability to communicate effectively with the student pilot. During the certification process, a flight instructor applicant is tested on a practical application of these skills in specific teaching situations. The quality of instruction, and the knowledge and skills acquired from your flight instructor will affect your entire flying career whether you plan to pursue it as a vocation or an avocation.

What Flight Training Requires

A course of instruction should include the ground and flight training necessary to acquire the knowledge and skills required to safely and efficiently function as a certificated pilot. Whether you attend a part 141 or part 61 school or obtain the services of an individual flight instructor, the specific knowledge and skill areas for each category and class of aircraft are outlined in Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR). Refer to 14 CFR part 61, subpart J for the requirements of a sport pilot certificate. Refer to 14 CFR part 61, subpart D for the requirements of a recreational pilot certificate. Refer to 14 CFR part 61, subpart E for the requirements of a private pilot certificate.

Medical Requirements for Flight Training

Pilots, except those who fly gliders or free air balloons, must possess a valid medical certificate in order to exercise the privileges of their airman certificates. Sport pilots must possess either a valid third-class medical certificate or a valid driver’s license. The periodic medical examination required for medical certification is conducted by designated aviation medical examiners, who are physicians with a special interest in aviation safety and have training in aviation medicine. The standards for medical certification are contained in 14 CFR part 67. The requirements for obtaining medical certification are contained in 14 CFR part 61.

Prior to beginning flight training, a flight instructor should interview you about any health conditions and determine your goal as a pilot. Good advice would be to obtain the class of medical certificate required, for the certificate level you ultimately want, before beginning flight training. Finding out immediately whether you are medically qualified could save time and money.

Flight Training FAQ for Pilot Students
How and Where Can I Get a Student Pilot Certificate?

An aviation medical examiner (AME) typically gives you a student pilot certificate to fill out as part of the third class medical exam. Your flight instructor will likely refer you to a local AME, or you can find an examiner online using AOPA’s database of AME’s searchable by city and state. A student pilot certificate is valid for 24 calendar months and a third class medical could be valid for up to 36 months, depending on your age at the time of your AME visit. If your student pilot certificate expires first, you can get a new one from a designated pilot examiner (DPE) or your local Flight Standards District Office (FSDO).

What Are Different Pilot Certificates?

Pilot Certificates issued by the FAA have the following characteristics:
Grade – determines the kinds of flying a pilot can do

  1. Student Pilot – local solo training flights without passengers
  2. Recreational Pilot – local uncontrolled day flights 1 passenger
  3. Private Pilot – flights worldwide with passengers, non-profit
  4. Commercial Pilot – paid flying allowed, can be airline copilot
  5. Airline Transport Pilot – paid flights, can be airline captain
How Long Does It Take to Learn to Fly and Get a Pilot Certificate?

The same variables that affect the cost of learning to fly will affect the time it takes to earn your certificate. The FAA has established the minimum number of flight hours needed to obtain a certificate. Under Part 61 of the federal aviation regulations, the minimums are 20 hours for a sport pilot certificate, 30 hours for a recreational certificate, and 40 hours for a private pilot certificate. Some schools operate under an alternate regulation, Part 141, which provides more FAA oversight, more rigid schedules, and more paperwork. The added requirements allow them to reduce the minimum hours of private pilot training to 35 hours. However, many schools believe that a true average flight training time for a private pilot is between 50 hours and 60 hours, whether the school operates under Part 61 or Part 141 schools. Others believe that 68 to 70 hours is the more likely average. These flight hours can be spread over a time span of several months to a year or more.

What Are the Differences Between a Part 61 and a Part 141 Flight School?

Part 141 flight schools have more FAA oversight, more rigid schedules, and more paperwork. For the added requirements, they are allowed to reduce the minimum required hours of private pilot training to 35 hours, rather than the 40-hour minimum required when training at a Part 61 flight school. The Part 61 school, on the other hand, is able to be more flexible with training schedules, and has the ability to tailor the curriculum to meet individual students’ training needs. Either school must train you to pass the very same practical test.

When Can I Fly Solo?

A: Your certified flight instructor (CFI) will carefully monitor your progress and, once you are both comfortable with your performance, the CFI will clear you to begin “solo” flights under his/her supervision. During solo flights you will fly the aircraft without anyone else on board – not even the instructor. Your first solo typically includes three take-offs and landings, and generally occurs within the first 25 hours of training.

When F1 Visa Is Required

An F1 visa is issued to international students who are attending an academic program or English Language Program at a US collge or university. F-1 students must maintain the minimum course load for full-time student status. They can remain in the US up to 60 days beyond the length of time it takes to complete their academic program. In addition, an F1 student can remain for 12 months after securing a degree to work under the OPT (Optional Practical Training) program. F1 students are expected to complete their studies by the expiration date on their I-20 form (Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant Student Status) which is provided by the US college or university that the student has been accepted to and will attend.

Five Facts About Flight Training

  • FACT: The current recession has created fierce competition for jobs in all industries. Now is the perfect opportunity for you to start your flight training in an industry that has tremendous potential!
  • FACT: Airline jobs are not going away, the demand is beginning to increase. For many current airline pilots, the mandatory retirement age is approaching!
  • FACT: The FAA is now taking a more serious look at airline pilot flight training. This is forcing the airline industry to take a harder look at candidates for pilot replacements!
  • FACT: Professional Pilots must now have first-rate knowledge and continually upgraded skills if they want to hear the word “Hired!” Pilots who train at quality aviation schools and who possess the technical knowledge, first-rate flying skills and a professional attitude will have the hiring edge!
  • FACT: Professionalism and knowledge are now prerequisites for entrance into the worldwide airline industry. Fast paced, “fast track” programs, or self-study courses will not meet the new airline industry standards.

Why Choose Aviator Flight School For Your Pilot Training
  • Licensed by the State of Florida Commission For Independent Education License #4155
    Aviator Flight Training Academy is a Division of Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology, which is licensed by the State of Florida Commission for Independent Education and Accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges.
  • 27 Years in the Flight Training Industry
    To date, Aviator has trained over 5000 pilots for the commercial airline industry
  • Only School Offering 200 Hours of Multi-Engine Time
    Aviator is the only flight school that has a full 200 hours of multi-engine time included in our program
  • No Flight Training Devices (Simulators)
    FTDs are not used towards your flight time for any ratings
  • Approved by the Federal Department of Education to offer Title IV Loans
    Aviator has the ability to offer students federal funding on approved accredited programs
  • Job Placement Assistance with Regional Airlines
    Aviator offers job placement assistance for our graduates
  • “A” Rating with United States Better Business Bureau
  • Classroom Environment – All classes taught in our educational center, NOT online

Contact Aviator
Schedule a Visit

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