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Aviation English & Testing at Aviator College

February 28, 2013 Leave a comment

Aviation English & Testing at Aviator CollegeEvery year students from all over the world come to USA for the best flight training experience. In addition to age, medical and other flight training requirements to be a pilot, one important requirement is: knowledge of English language.

How and Why English was Established as the Standard Language of Aviation

In the year 1944 on the 1st of November in response to a British initiative, the government of the United States invited 55 allied and neutral States to meet in Chicago. Out of the allied States invited 52 attended this meeting. The aim of this meeting was to discuss the international problems faced in Civil Aviation.

Outcome of the Meeting

The Chicago Convention saw the implementation of English as the official standardized language to be used in Aviation around the world. English speaking countries dominated the design, manufacture as well as operation of aircrafts 1, it thus made sense to have English as the standard language that would be used by all the countries involved in Aviation around the globe. Having a standardized language aids in avoiding misunderstanding and confusion, aspects which both have an effect on air safety (source).

ICAO Language Proficiency requirements

Appendix A (Annex 1) of ICAO Doc 9835, which sets out the language proficiency requirements, states that pilots, air traffic controllers and aeronautical station operators shall demonstrate the ability to speak and understand the language used for radiotelephony communications to the level specified in the Appendix. The six descriptors:

  1. Pronunciation
  2. Structure
  3. Vocabulary
  4. Fluency
  5. Comprehension
  6. Interaction

All six descriptors must be met at any given level for a candidate to be rated as having attained that level.

Aviation English & Testing at Aviator College

International students that are enrolling in one of our pilot programs and wish to increase their English to a level 4 (four) or higher, may enroll at our Aviation English Course at the same time. Research shows that students can quickly earn their ICAO level 4 (four) certificate in as little as one month, which could also reduce your cost in flight training. The course will consist of one month of training by highly experienced English Instructors and easy-to-follow curriculum. The curriculum consists of small classroom group studies, one-on-one instruction, data base and E-Mailing criteria.

As mandated by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) in accordance with ICAO English Language Proficiency Requirements, all pilots and air traffic personnel are now required to demonstrate English Proficency according to a minimum of Operational Level 4 (four) standards.

Achievements of the Course
  • Improved student speech in an aviation setting through phonetic practice.(Study & Practice of human speech)
  • Improved student aviation radio communication through increased listening skills
  • Preparation to achieve a rating of Level 4 English according to ICAO standards
  • Strengthened grammar to make aviation communication easier
  • Increased student’s aviation vocabulary
  • ICAO Approved Compliant Testing on campus

Why Choose Aviator English
  • In house Testing
  • Pickup to and from Orlando or Palm Beach International Airports.
  • Sunny Florida USA
  • 2 Miles from the ocean
  • Learning in an Aviation Atmosphere
  • Flight Training if needed FAA & JAA
  • Save money and time
  • Personalized Instruction for Each Student

You will
  • Increase your ability to get a great job in Aviation
  • Train with Higly skilled Native American English speaking instructors
  • Learn easily in a small class size
  • Prepare yourself to take the ICAO approved exam
  • Ensure safety through good English communication skills
  • Test on site to receive your ICAO certificate
  • Feel confident in your ability to communicate in Aviation English
  • Earn your ICAO Level 4 Certificate.

The students that achieve level 4 proficiency or higher will recieve and English Proficiency certificate. The certificate showing ICAO level 4 ( four) standards will be valid for 3 (three) years. Students that achieve ICAO level 5 (five) or higher the certificate will be valid for 6 (six) years.

* Program Cost $1,950.00 includes testing.

** Students that might need additional classes will be billed at a reduced price.

*** Students that believe their English level meets ICAO level 4(four) standards may test upon arrival. $ 550.00 for testing.
Class dates, first week of every month. Excluding December and January call for special dates

For further information contact Michelle in the Aviation English Department.
(772) 466-4822 x 134 or E-Mail mhaworth@aviator.edu

Distributed by Viestly

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Pre Solo Flight Training FAQ for Pilot Students

February 26, 2013 Leave a comment

Pre Solo Flight Training FAQ for Pilot StudentsAccording to the FAR, in order to solo, there are two basic requirements: The student must first have a Student Pilot Certificate, which is normally issued by an FAA Medical Examiner together with a Third Class Medical Certificate. While a student pilot may begin his training prior to obtaining this certificate, he/she must have it before the first solo flight. The second requirement is that the student’s instructor must authorize solo flight by making an endorsement in the student’s logbook. There are a number of guidelines set forth to help the instructor evaluate a student’s readiness to solo, including knowledge requirements (which may be tested orally or by a written test), and the demonstrated ability to perform certain maneuvers, but in the end the determination rests with the instructor (source).

While undergoing flight training in flight school, every student pilot has questions about their first solo flight. Here are answers to those most frequently asked questions, provided by AOPA. (source).

What does the term solo mean, and what is the significance of soloing?

From a legal standpoint, Federal Aviation Regulation 61.87 says that the term “solo flight as used in this subpart means that flight time during which a student pilot is the sole occupant of the aircraft.” A common industry definition says “solo is any flight time during which the pilot is the only occupant on board;” the difference is that the regulation specifies student but the term really applies to any certificated pilot. Definitions aside, your first solo flight is an important milestone in your training and a moment worthy of celebration. It’s an experience you’ll always remember as among the coolest things you’ve ever done.

Where can I find the requirements that must be met before I can solo?

There are many different flight maneuvers, 15 in all, that you must be able to perform competently before you can solo. Some of these basic maneuvers are stalls, steep turns, and slow flight. Your instructor must maintain a record that documents that these training maneuvers have been accomplished. Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) Part 61.87 includes a list of these maneuvers. You must be at least 16 years of age (you’ll have to be 17 before you can earn a private pilot certificate). You must pass a medical exam and receive a student pilot/third class medical certificate from an aviation medical examiner. And you must pass a pre-solo written test (see below).

Does everyone have to take a pre-solo written test?

Yes. It is a requirement under the Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR 61.87) to take a pre-solo written exam. Before soloing, a student must demonstrate that they understand the regulatory and operational information that is pertinent to the solo phase of their flight training. This test helps assure this by addressing information appropriate to the solo flight, including regulations, local airspace, procedures, and aircraft operations and limitations. The instructor is responsible for administering the test and reviewing incorrect answers with the student.

How will I know when I’m ready to solo?

As the final prerequisite, a student pilot and the certificated flight instructor must come together in a meeting of the minds. When the moment comes, trust your newly acquired skills, your judgment, and the judgment of your instructor. Remember that your instructor will know when you are ready, even if you are not sure. Draw on your training — and welcome to the community of flight!

Are there any tips or suggestions I can use to help me prepare for my first solo?

Yes, there are. There will be some anxiety and nervousness prior to your first solo. Your instructor will let you solo once you consistently demonstrate that you are ready. Just prior to solo, most instructors will silently observe your performance and decision-making during the flight. This “simulated” solo will give you an idea of what it will be like in the cockpit without constant instructor input. Take advantage of these flights to test your own decision-making skills. Here is an article with some points to remember before you take your first solo flight.

Individual Flight Training Courses

The Aviator Flight Training Academy offers a full line of flight training courses to meet the individual needs of each student. Contact Aviator today to get details about pilot training program of your choice.

Schedule a visit.

Distributed by Viestly

Differences Between PPL and CPL Pilot Licenses

February 24, 2013 Leave a comment

Differences Between PPL and CPL Pilot LicensesThere are a lot of students who are attracted towards aviation as career. CPL and PPL are the licenses needed for if wish to become a pilot. Although both coveted and popular, there are differences in what each pilot license can offer. Below, we will cover the basic requirements, training and differences between 2 licenses.

The Private Pilot License (PPL)

PPL Basic Requirements
Here are just a few of the basics requirements for the Private Pilot License.

  • You must be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English Language
  • You must be able to obtain at least a 3rd class FAA medical certificate
  • You must be 16 years old to get your student pilot license
  • You must to be 17 years old to get your private pilot license
  • You have to acquire 40 hours total flying time
  • 10 hours of the 40 hours must be solo (alone) flight time
  • 5 hours of the 10 solo must be cross- country (flying from one airport to another)
  • You must pass the FAA Private Pilot written exam
  • You must pass the Private Pilot Oral and Practical Exam
PPL Flight Training Course

Private Pilot License is also the license given for the aspirants who are interested in flying aircrafts. But this license is only given for the pilots in non-commercial aircrafts. It is mainly for those who wish to take pilot job as a hobby or for those who own an aircraft. These people are not paid for the work. For getting this license, they must undergo training of minimum 40 flying hours.  The minimum age required is 16 years and they should have medical fitness as per the standard rules.

CPL Course

The commercial pilot license (CPL) is the qualification that allows its holder to play the role of a pilot. Many types of Commercial Pilot Certificates are issued to eligible candidates for major aircraft categories. This includes airships, helicopters and Airplanes. CPL certifications are also given to pilot aircrafts such as balloons and gyro-planes.

Commercial Pilot License 

Basic Requirements

Here are just a few of the basic requirements for the Commercial License.

  • You must be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English Language
  • You must be able to obtain a 2nd class medical certificate
  • You must be 18 years of age
  • You must hold at least a private pilot license
  • You must have received and logged the appropriate ground and flight training for the Commercial License
  • You must have 250 hours total flight time
  • You must have 100 hours flight time as pilot in command
  • You must have 50 hours of cross country flight time as pilot in command
  • You must pass the FAA Commercial Pilot written exam
  • You must pass the Commercial Pilot Oral and Practical Exam
CPL Training Course

Training for the commercial license is not all that different than from your private license. Then difference is in the tolerances that you are going to be held to. In addition you will learn some new manoeuvres along the way and be required to demonstrate them to proficiency on the check ride. The main goal before beginning your training for the commercial license is to build your time towards the 250 total time requirement. Included in that time is 100 hours as pilot in command, and 50 hours of cross-country. Since most folks have about 60hrs after they complete their private license you have some time to build. Even if you choose to obtain an instrument rating to help knock out some of that time you still have a ways to go to reach 250 hours total time. One idea is to do a lot of cross-country flying. You can go see places you’ve always wanted to see, and best of all you’re the pilot. (source)

Key Differentiators between CPL Course and PPL course

CPL is the license given to those who wish to take up career as a pilot with the commercial airlines whereas PPL is for those who wish to be a pilot as a hobby or for those who own an aircraft.
CPL can be acquired by those who have completed senior secondary examinations and who satisfies an age of 17 years. PPL can be obtained after 10th with minimum of 16 years age.
A person who holds CPL must have obtained PPL earlier whereas PPL can be obtained directly.
Although CPL and PPL are the licenses needed for a pilot; their nature and purpose of use are different in many aspects.

Pro Pilot Programs At Aviator Flight Training Academy

The pilot programs at Aviator Academy are designed to provide what the airline industry demands of future commercial pilots. The training you will receive at Aviator is one of the most intensive and challenging programs offered in aviation today.

The school’s new 37,000 sq. ft. training facilities are open from 7 am to 6 pm daily and provisions are made to access the aircraft for flight training 24 hours-a-day, rain or shine.

During your flight training you will fly a total of 259 hours, of which 200 hours will be in a multi-engine aircraft. The ground school portion is a structured classroom environment. You will receive a minimum of 643 instructional hours, including all of the ground and flight training. Student housing is on a contract basis, pricing is selected from the options below, terms included in the students’ enrollment agreement are as follows: Private Pilot program includes 6 months of housing, if you come with a PPL 5 months will be included. Commercial Pilot program includes 4 months of housing, if you come with a PPL 3 months will be included. After your flight training, you will have the opportunity to become an entry level flight instructor.

Contact Aviator to inquire about pilot training program of your choice.

Distributed by Viestly

Flight School Selection Process

February 23, 2013 Leave a comment

Flight School Selection ProcessEnrollment in an FAA-approved school usually ensures a high quality of training. FAA-approved schools meet prescribed standards with respect to equipment, facilities, personnel, and curricula. However, many excellent pilot schools find it impractical to qualify for the FAA certification, and are referred to as non-approved schools.

When you begin your flight school selection process, you must first understand the terms used in describing flight schools and their level of certification. The most basic level of flight training facility operates under Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) Part 61. The regulation identifies the minimum certification requirements for all pilot and flight instructors. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has no direct oversight as to the day-to-day operations of flight schools operating under FAR Part 61.

One of the differences between FAA-approved schools and non-approved schools is that fewer flight hours are required to qualify for a pilot certificate in an FAA-approved school. The requirement for a private pilot certificate is 40 hours in a non-approved school, and 35 hours in an approved school. However, since most people require 60 to 75 hours of training, this difference may be insignificant for a private pilot certificate.

Flight schools come in two flavors, Part 61 and Part 141, which refer to the parts of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) under which they operate. The most common and least important distinction between them is the minimum flight time required for the private certificate — 40 hours under Part 61, and 35 hours under Part 141.

The FAR Part 141 flight training facility differs from their Part 61 counterpart by the level of FAA participation. All FAR Part 141 schools must undergo a lengthy and very thorough evaluation by the FAA prior to conducting training. They must have in place a management structure that meets the minimum experience requirements as outlined in FAR Part 141. The FAR Part 141 course curriculum has a minimum standard outlined in the appendix section of FAR Part 141 and must obtain FAA approval prior to conducting training. Due to this increased FAA participation , FAR Part 141 training facilities are able to offer the same certification courses as FAR Part 61 facilities , but with reduced minimum requirements. The pilot applicants are held to the same standards as outlined in the appropriate PTS.

Flight School Location

Depending on your flight training needs, the location of the flight school may play a large role in the quality of the course. Florida is a great place for flight training as the weather stays warm throughout the year. If you select a training facility in a region that often experiences poor weather conditions such as rain, fog , thunderstorms , and strong winds, your number of flights may be reduced. On of the many factors that contribute to successful completion of flight school is flight time availability so choose wisely.

Flight School Aircraft and Maintenance

When discussing the aircraft utilized for flight training, the areas of interest are availability and maintenance. The training airplane is where you practice in the air what you’ve learned on the ground. High wing or low, it doesn’t make much difference. What’s important is how well the airplane is equipped and maintained. It’s also important that the school’s trainers are dedicated to training and not to rental. How many trainers a school has depends on the number of active students. Generally speaking, one trainer serves four or five full-time students. This ratio may be higher with part-time students. Another consideration is the fleet’s mix of primary, advanced, and multi engine trainers.

Because trainers are flown often and sometimes hard, how a school maintains its training fleet is important for both safety and scheduling. Asking questions about maintenance policies and procedures should be part of every school interview.

The availability of aircraft for you to conduct your training is important. A good number of aircraft as a minimum is three. This will better allow for scheduled and unscheduled maintenance, a more flexible flight schedule , and a better idea of the maintenance practices of the training facility. The number of aircraft that a school operates should be based upon the student load of that facility. So, if the school has only one aircraft or ten , the ability of that facility to offer you a comprehensive schedule to fit your needs as the customer is paramount. At no time should the quality of the training be compromised for the quantity of customers.

Maintenance of an aircraft must be performed. There are maintenance procedures outlined in the FARs that must be performed at given intervals. These maintenance procedures must be logged and endorsed by the appropriate maintenance personnel. You the student , soon to be the Pilot In Command of those same aircraft should become familiar with the aircraft that you fly. You will soon become responsible for determining whether an aircraft is in airworthy condition.

Flight School Flight Instructors

A good flight instructor is important because your life will depend on what he or she teaches you. Don’t hesitate to ask questions about the training and experience of the flight instructors. You might ask what the average flight time is and what the pass/fail rate is among the instructors. (A pass rate of 100 percent doesn’t indicate good instruction.) You might also talk to some of the other students at the school to ask about their flight instructors.

Your primary instructor should be at least a certificated flight instructor (CFI). Ensure that your instrument instructor has an instrument instructor rating (CFII). Instrument training received from a non-rated instructor can cause problems when it comes to meeting FAA requirements.

Pilot Student Center, Housing Availability

A lot of students from different countries wish to do their flight training in USA. It is your duty to research flight schools that have resources available to assist you with your flight-training career. If you are a flight student from another country – a flight school should have a counselor or a department for international students and housing options.

The Final Decision

What flight school you ultimately choose depends on the quality training you desire in a method convenient to your schedule. In earning your private pilot’s certificate, you will have achieved a “license” to learn. Aviation is an ever-changing activity, and good pilots are always learning.

A Checklist for Choosing a Good Flight School
  • Determine your aviation goals. Are you learning to fly for fun or do you plan to pursue a career?
  • Compile a list of schools to examine, and request literature from each. Review material from each school and answer the questions outlined earlier in this brochure.
  • Visit the final two or three schools that pass the test. Ask questions and get a feel for the personalities of the schools. Ask specific questions and insist on specific answers. Talk to other students and flight instructors.
  • Inquire about a written agreement that outlines the payment procedures.
Why Choose Aviator Flight School For Your Pilot Training

  • Licensed by the State of Florida Commission For Independent Education License #4155
  • Aviator Flight Training Academy is a Division of Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology, which is licensed by the State of Florida Commission for Independent Education and Accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges.
  • 27 Years in the Flight Training Industry
  • To date, Aviator has trained over 5000 pilots for the commercial airline industry
  • Only School Offering 200 Hours of Multi-Engine Time
  • Aviator is the only flight school that has a full 200 hours of multi-engine time included in our program
  • No Flight Training Devices (Simulators)
  • FTDs are not used towards your flight time for any ratings
  • Approved by the Federal Department of Education to offer Title IV Loans
  • Aviator has the ability to offer students federal funding on approved accredited programs
  • Job Placement Assistance with Regional Airlines
  • Aviator offers job placement assistance for our graduates
  • “A” Rating with United States Better Business Bureau
  • Classroom Environment – All classes taught in our educational center, NOT online

Contact Aviator

Schedule a Visit

To speak with an instructor contact the college at 772-672-8222.

Distributed by Viestly

All About Private Pilot Knowledge And Written Tests

February 19, 2013 Leave a comment

All About Private Pilot Knowledge And Written TestsThe FAA Written for Pilot Certification is a major hurdle for many student pilots.

FAA WRITTEN REQUIREMENTS FAR PART 61
PART 61–CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS
Sec. 61.35 Knowledge test: Prerequisites and passing grades.

(a) An applicant for a knowledge test must have:
(1) Received an endorsement, if required by this part, from an authorized instructor certifying that the applicant accomplished the appropriate ground-training or a home-study course required by this part for the certificate or rating sought and is prepared for the knowledge test; and
(2) Proper identification at the time of application that contains the applicant’s–
(i) Photograph;
(ii) Signature;
(iii) Date of birth, which shows the applicant meets or will meet the age requirements of this part for the certificate sought before the expiration date of the airman knowledge test report; and
(iv) Actual residential address, if different from the applicant’s mailing address.
(b) The Administrator shall specify the minimum passing grade for the knowledge test.

FAA Written Eligibility Requirements

Sec. 61.103 Eligibility requirements: General.
To be eligible for a private pilot certificate, a person must:
(a) Be at least 17 years of age for a rating in other than a glider or balloon.
(b) Be at least 16 years of age for a rating in a glider or balloon.
(c) Be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English language. If the applicant is unable to meet one of these requirements due to medical reasons, then the Administrator may place such operating limitations on that applicant’s pilot certificate as are necessary for the safe operation of the aircraft.
(d) Receive a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor who:
(1) Conducted the training or reviewed the person’s home study on the aeronautical knowledge areas listed in Sec. 61.105(b) of this part that apply to the aircraft rating sought; and
(2) Certified that the person is prepared for the required knowledge test.
(e) Pass the required knowledge test on the aeronautical knowledge areas listed in Sec. 61.105(b) of this part.
(f) Receive flight training and a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor who:
(1) Conducted the training in the areas of operation listed in Sec. 61.107(b) of this part that apply to the aircraft rating sought; and
(2) Certified that the person is prepared for the required practical test.
(g) Meet the aeronautical experience requirements of this part that apply to the aircraft rating sought before applying for the practical test.
(h) Pass a practical test on the areas of operation listed in Sec. 61.107(b) of this part that apply to the aircraft rating sought.
(i) Comply with the appropriate sections of this part that apply to the aircraft category and class rating sought.

Private Pilot Knowledge Tests FAQ from FAA

How old do I have to be to take the recreational pilot or private pilot written test?
At least 15 years old. If you want to pilot a balloon or glider, you must be at least 14 years old. Before taking the knowledge test, you may have to show proof of age, such as a birth certificate.

How should I prepare for the knowledge test?
You should study the materials identified by your flight instructor or included in a home-study course. For the recreational pilot test, the materials are based on section 61.97 of FAA’s rules. For the private pilot test, the materials are based on section 61.105 of FAA’s rules.

What document or documents must I present before taking a knowledge test?
You have to present identification that includes your photograph, signature, and home address. Any one of the following:

  • A certificate of graduation from a pilot training course conducted by an FAA-approved pilot school, or a statement of accomplishment from the school certifying the satisfactory completion of the ground-school portion of such a course
  • A written statement from an FAA-certified ground or flight instructor, certifying that you have satisfactorily completed the required ground instruction
  • Logbook entries by an FAA-certified ground or flight instructor, certifying satisfactory completion of the required ground instruction
  • A certificate of graduation or statement of accomplishment from a ground school course conducted by an agency such as a high school, college, adult education program, the Civil Air Patrol, or an ROTC Flight Training Program
  • A certificate of graduation from a home-study course developed by the aeronautical enterprise providing the study material

If you can’t provide any of the above items, you can have the home-study course you have completed reviewed by an FAA inspector to assure you are competent to take the desired knowledge test. Contact the local FAA Flight Standards District Office to get an appointment with an FAA inspector. The inspector will review your study material and may question you on some of the material. If you are found qualified to take the test, the inspector will issue FAA Form 8060-7, Airman’s Authorization for Written Test. You must present this form when you take your knowledge examination.

If you have to take the test over again, you must present either the unsatisfactory AC Form 8080-2, Airman Written Test Report, or an airman computer test report (if the test was taken at an FAA-designated computer testing center).

If I fail the knowledge test, is there any way to determine the areas in which I need additional work so I can study for a retest?
Yes. You will receive either AC Form 8080-2, Airman Written Test Report, or an airman computer test report (if the test was taken at an FAA-designated computer testing center). The test report will contain your test score and will also list the subject matter codes for the knowledge areas in which you were found deficient. An outline of the subject matter codes is located in the appendix of each written test book. You may refer to the appropriate written test book to determine the areas in which further study is needed.

If I pass the knowledge test, will I receive the same information concerning weak areas as I would if I failed the test?
Yes. (Refer to the previous answer.)

How long is a satisfactorily completed knowledge test valid?

A satisfactorily completed knowledge test expires two years from the day it was taken. If a practical test is not satisfactorily completed during that period, another knowledge test must be taken.

Will my instructor review the areas in which the test report showed I was deficient?
Yes. Your instructor must review the areas in which you were deficient and must endorse the written test report or provide a written endorsement indicating this review has been completed.

Source-FAA FAQ

Pilot Training Program With Aviator Flight Training Academy 259 Flight Hours

Aviator Flight Training Academy offers professional pilot training programs with a minimum of 200 hours of multi-engine time. The flight school has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator), large classrooms and individual briefing rooms.

Contact Aviator
Schedule a Visit

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Common Requirements, Skills and Knowledge To Be Pilot

February 18, 2013 Leave a comment

Common Requirements, Skills and Knowledge To Be PilotThe aviation industry might have the most stringent selection tests of any industry. Flying multi million dollar airplanes isn’t suited for just anyone. The objective of these pilot selection tests is to assess pilots prior to selection by an airline in order to provide an overall assessment of the general skills of candidates. In general you will be tested on six key flying aptitudes that a good pilot needs for his profession.

The following table outlines common requirements to become an airline pilot:

  • Degree Level: A degree is not always required, but a bachelor’s degree may improve job prospects and solid career choices
  • Degree Fields: Aircraft operations, aviation, aeronautical engineering or a related field
  • Licensure and Certification: A commercial pilot’s license and instrument rating are required; airline captains also need an airline transport pilot certificate*
  • Experience : 250 hours of flight experience for a commercial pilot’s license, 1,500 hours of flight time for an airline transport pilot certificate*
  • Key Skills: Strong communication skills, depth perception, monitoring skills, quick reaction time, problem-solving skills, attention to detail*
  • Computer Skills: Ability to operate aircraft computer and navigation systems**
  • Technical Skills: Ability to use a radio, run pre-flight checks and monitor engine and hydraulic systems*
  • Additional Requirements: Individuals must be 18 to receive a commercial pilots license and 23 to receive a transport pilot certificate*, pilots are required to retire at 65; applicants are required to pass a physical examination, have vision that can be corrected to 20/20, possess passing scores on psychological and aptitude tests and pass a drug test**
Why Aviation School or College Degree

Many airlines, especially in the United States, prefer applicants with a college degree. Aviation schools and aviation colleges provide the best learning and training environments for students to succeed and prepare for a career in aviation. You may already be aware of the many benefits of going to college such as better paying jobs, access to a wider range of career choices, and exposure to a wide range of people and cultures. Going to an aviation school or aviation college also has many benefits.

An aviation school or aviation college will allow you to:

  • Gain greater knowledge and expand your skills in a specific aviation career field.
  • Earn an aviation degree, an associate’s degree, and/or bachelor’s degree in an aviation program.
  • Access a wide range of aviation resources and tools to help you with your aviation career.
  • Participate in various aviation internship programs.
  • Increase your chances of networking with aviation employers to gain employment.
  • TIP: Your goal is to find an aviation school or aviation college that is right for you and an aviation career that suits your interests.
How to Choose an Aviation College

Choosing an aviation college that meets your educational goals, career goals, and individual needs is not an easy task and is an important decision to make. When choosing a aviation college you must consider the quality of education, reputation, accreditation, admission requirements, college costs, and how you plan to pay for college. The process of choosing an aviation college typically involves: knowing what you are looking in a school, researching those schools, and making a final decision.

  • Determine your Aviation Career goals
  • College Accreditation
  • Select Aviation College Characteristics
  • Research Aviation College Options
  • Request College Applications and literature
  • Develop a Short List of Aviation Colleges.
  • Visit the Aviation College(s).
  • Make a final decision of your Aviation College.
Why Choose Aviator College For Your Pilot Training
  • Licensed by the State of Florida Commission For Independent Education License #4155
  • Aviator Flight Training Academy is a Division of Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology, which is licensed by the State of Florida Commission for Independent Education and Accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges.
  • 27 Years in the Flight Training Industry
  • To date, Aviator has trained over 5000 pilots for the commercial airline industry
  • Only School Offering 200 Hours of Multi-Engine Time
  • Aviator is the only flight school that has a full 200 hours of multi-engine time included in our program
  • No Flight Training Devices (Simulators)
  • FTDs are not used towards your flight time for any ratings
  • Approved by the Federal Department of Education to offer Title IV Loans
  • Aviator has the ability to offer students federal funding on approved accredited programs
  • Job Placement Assistance with Regional Airlines
  • Aviator offers job placement assistance for our graduates
  • “A” Rating with United States Better Business Bureau
  • Classroom Environment – All classes taught in our educational center, NOT online

Schedule a Visit
Contact Us
Online Enrollment
 

Distributed by Viestly

Preparation For Your Solo Flight and Successful Flight Training Tips

February 15, 2013 Leave a comment

Preparation For Your Solo Flight and Successful Flight Training Tips

FAA General Prerequisites to Solo
  • Obtain third class medical certificate/student pilot certificate.
  • Be at least 16 years of age (to solo).
  • Be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English language.
First Solo Requirements

According to the FAR, in order to solo, there are two basic requirements: The student must first have a Student Pilot Certificate, which is normally issued by an FAA Medical Examiner together with a Third Class Medical Certificate. While a student pilot may begin his training prior to obtaining this certificate, he/she must have it before the first solo flight. The second requirement is that the student’s instructor must authorize solo flight by making an endorsement in the student’s logbook.

There are a number of guidelines set forth to help the instructor evaluate a student’s readiness to solo, including knowledge requirements (which may be tested orally or by a written test), and the demonstrated ability to perform certain maneuvers, but in the end the determination rests with the instructor.

Factors That Contribute To Successful Flight Training and Learning Experience

Time of year

Summer flying gives longer days but does not provide the most desirable range of experience. Aircraft are more available in the late autumn and winter. Darkness in early morning and early evening is a problem. Learning to fly during the worst weather periods is the best way to maintain your attention to the vagaries that affect flying. Learn in the fall or winter; enjoy in the summer.

Finances

It is a good idea not to begin flying until money is set aside just for flying. The first twenty hours of learning to fly will be the most concentrated cash-outflow you will face unless you buy an airplane.

Weight

If our weight requires the use of a larger aircraft such as a Piper Pa28 or Cessna C172 the cost per flight hour will be more. The increased cost is somewhat offset by the time saved meeting cross-country requirements and en-route time to local airports.

Ground School

There is no reason that a person should not be able to self-study ground school with about 3-5 hours of tutoring.

Preparation

Don’t fly if you are not prepared for a lesson. You will get the most bang for your bucks by being prepared. Even the best instruction cannot fully compensate for lack of preparation.

Commitment to Flying

You must be able to give priority to the time and energy required for learning to fly. If you can’t or won’t establish the priority, don’t start. You must keep ahead of the flight program with your reading and preparation. You must not allow money to become a detriment to your commitment. Flying is not cheap and will not become any less expensive as you continue.

  • Your life ambition must be to become an old pilot.
  • Being a pilot is a state of mind; a personality. A pilot’s attitude, not just experience makes for excellence. Excellence is a quality standard in flying sought but not often achieved. Desire must be there but unless it is accompanied by application there will be no progress.
  • The good pilot is able resist the temptation to do something unsafe, illegal, or stupid. The temptations will always exist.
  • A good pilot will not fly in aircraft or conditions beyond his capability or certification.
  • A good pilot is always a student, striving to make every manoeuvre a bit more precise than the one before.
  • A good pilot knows his equipment, its limitations and how to handle its malfunctions.
  • ATC can determine much about a pilot by how well he utilizes the system and the required communications. Always admit when you have a problem.
  • A requirement of being a pilot is in knowing the rules that apply to your rating, your responsibilities, and the flight involved.
  • An instructor can only show you the way to the required learning. It is your responsibility to know what you need to know and to confirm that you get it. This is the most difficult area of student responsibility. Flying the plane is a relatively minor part of what you need to know.
  • The best time to get involved in an activity is before interest in it peaks.
  • Being a pilot is a state of mind; a personality. A pilot’s attitude, makes for excellence. Excellence is a quality standard in flying sought but not often achieved. Desire must be there but unless it is accompanied by application there will be no progress.(Source). 
Flight School and Flight Training Programs

For more than 27 years Aviator has been the leader in multi-engine flight training. We have provided over 5000 professional pilots to the airline industry, both nationally and worldwide, through our Professional Pilot Flight Training Programs. Our FAA-certified Part 141 approved flight programs provide students with the skills and experience demanded by today’s commercial aviation industry. Aviator is accredited by the ACCSC (Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges).

Our Professional Pilot Program is set in a flight training, structured environment to ensure the student receives the knowledge that is required to be a professional pilot. This program is from 0 hours to over 250 hours, of which 200 hours will be multi-engine time. The program includes Private Pilot Single Engine through the Multi-Engine Flight Instructor Certificate. Cross Country flying is coast-to-coast, if desired.

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