Archive

Archive for September, 2013

Pilot Certification Requirements

September 30, 2013 Leave a comment

Pilot Certification RequirementsTo operate an aircraft in the United States, you must be licensed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), which since 9/11 is part of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). There are several levels of pilot’s license; the most basic is the Private Pilot license. This license permits the holder to pilot an aircraft anywhere in the United States, and to carry passengers. A Private Pilot may not be paid to fly an aircraft (to ferry an aircraft from one location to another, for example), nor carry passengers or cargo for hire or compensation. However, you may share certain expenses with your passengers (with some restrictions).

The necessary steps to earn this license are:

  • Be at least 16 years old.
  • Read, speak, and understand English sufficiently to understand the aviation rules and communicate with Air Traffic Control.
  • Pass a basic medical examination.
  • Receive the required amount of instruction from a Certificated Flight Instructor (CFI).
  • Pass a written examination (100 multiple-choice questions).
  • Pass a “checkride” (aircraft equivalent of a driving test) given by an FAA-approved examiner.

Information outlined below lists hours requirements needed for certification of Recreational Pilot, Private Pilot, Commercial Pilot and ATP.

Recreational Pilot Certification

I. For Single Engine Airplane, Helicopter, or Gyroplane Ratings:
Total Time: 30 hours which consists of at least-
A. Dual: 15 hours of flight training with an instructor on the Recreational Pilot areas of operation, that includes:
1. 2 hours of en route flight training to another airport in the class of aircraft; and
2. 3 hours of flight training in the class of aircraft within the preceding 60 days prior to the practical test
B. Solo: 3 hours of solo flying in the class of aircraft on the Recreational Pilot areas of operation.

Private Pilot Certification

NOTE 1: Where § 61.109 requires “. . . 3 hours of flight training by reference to instruments in a single engine airplane” [i.e., II.A.3.] or “. . . in a multiengine airplane” [i.e., III. A.3.] or “. . . in a poweredlift” [i.e., VI. A.3.] it has to be in the aircraft in flight. It cannot be in a FS, FTD, or an PCATC. The “. . . flight training by reference to instruments . . .” must have been in the aircraft in flight.

II. For a Single Engine Airplane Rating:
Total Time: 40 hours which consists of at least-
A. Dual: 20 hours of flight training with an instructor on the Private Pilot areas of operation that includes:
1. 3 hours of cross-country flight training in a single engine airplane;
2. 3 hours of night flight training in a single engine airplane, that includes at least-
a. 1 cross-country flight of over 100 nm. total distance; and
b. 10 takeoffs and 10 landings with each involving a flight in the traffic pattern.
3. 3 hours of flight training by reference to instruments in a single engine airplane; and (See Note 1)
4. 3 hours of flight training in a single engine airplane within the preceding 60 days prior to the practical test.
B. Solo: 10 hours of solo flying in a single engine airplane on the Private Pilot areas of operation, that includes:
1. 5 hours of solo cross-country flying;
2. 1 solo cross-country flight of at least 150 nm. total distance with 3 points and one segment of at least 50 nm. between takeoff and landings; and
3. 3 takeoffs and landings at a controlled airport.

III. For a Multiengine Airplane Rating:
Total Time: 40 hours which consists of at least-
A. Dual: 20 hours of flight training with an instructor on the Private Pilot areas of operation that includes:
1. 3 hours of cross-country flight training in a multiengine airplane;
2. 3 hours of night flight training in a multiengine airplane, that includes at least-
a. 1 cross-country flight of over 100 nm. total distance; and
b. 10 takeoffs and 10 landings with each involving a flight in the traffic pattern.
3. 3 hours of flight training by reference to instruments in a multiengine airplane; and (See Note 1)
4. 3 hours of flight training in a multiengine airplane within the preceding 60 days prior to the practical test.
B. Solo: 10 hours of solo flying in an airplane on the Private Pilot areas of operation, that includes:
1. 5 hours of solo cross-country flying;
2. 1 solo cross-country flight of at least 150 nm. total distance with 3 points and one segment of at least 50 nm. between takeoff and landing; and
3. 3 takeoffs and landings at a controlled airport.

Commercial Pilot Certification

NOTE 2: Except for Commercial Pilot applicants who complete a Part 141 approved Commercial Pilot Certification course of training, the “10 hours of solo flying . . . on the Commercial Pilot areas of operation” for the single engine airplane, multiengine airplane, helicopter, gyroplane, and powered lift ratings would need to reflect at least 20 hours of solo time in the “Solo” box of the aircraft category on the “Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application” (FAA Form 8710-1) to account for the Private Pilot solo aeronautical experience.

NOTE 3: Per § 61.129(b)(4), it permits a Commercial Pilot applicant for the multiengine airplane rating to be either solo flight time or performing the duties of PIC with an instructor onboard. In the case of a Commercial Pilot applicant for the multiengine airplane rating who performed “. . . . 10 hours of flight time performing the duties of pilot in command in a multiengine airplane with an authorized instructor . . .” [i.e., § 61.129(b)(4)], the aeronautical experience shown in the “Solo” box for the “Airplane” category on the “Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application” (FAA Form 8710-1) may only reflect 10 hours of solo flight time, and the “Pilot in Command” box would be required to show at least 100 hours [i.e., § 61.129(b)(2)].
NOTE 4: Applicants for a commercial pilot certificate with the airplane single engine, airplane multiengine, helicopter, gyroplane, or powered-lift ratings and who already holds an instrument rating that is appropriate to the category and class rating sought are not required to accomplish an additional “. . . 10 hours of instrument training . . .” as stated in § 61.129(a)(3)(i); § 61.129(b)(3)(i); § 61.129(c)(3)(i); § 61.129(d)(3)(i); and § 61.129(e)(3)(i). However, the required commercial pilot training hour requirements [i.e., “. . . on the areas of operation listed in § 61.127 . . .”] of 20 hours in § 61.129(a)(3), (b)(3), (c)(3), (d)(3), and (e)(3) cannot be reduced to 10 hours.

NOTE 5: If an applicant already holds a commercial pilot certificate and an instrument rating, and is seeking an additional aircraft class rating within the same category of aircraft rating held by the applicant then that applicant [per § 61.63(c)(4)] “. . . Need not meet the specified training time requirements prescribed by this part that apply to the pilot certificate for the aircraft class rating sought unless the person holds a lighter-than-air category rating with a balloon class rating and is seeking an airship class rating; and . . .”]. Otherwise, that applicant need not accomplish an additional “. . . 10 hours of instrument training . . .”. However, the instructor will be expected to provide the applicant with enough instrument training in order for the applicant to demonstrate satisfactory proficiency and competency on Area of Operation VII Navigation.

NOTE 6: If an applicant is undergoing a combined Part 141 Commercial Pilot Certification and Instrument Rating approved course then that applicant need not accomplish an additional “. . . 10 hours of instrument training . . .”. Because in this situation, the applicant is getting instrument training and there would be no way, or need, to differentiate the instrument training required in the Instrument Rating course with the instrument training required in the Commercial Pilot Certification course.

NOTE 7: The 10 hours performing the duties as PIC with an instructor on board should be listed in the “Pilot in Command” column of the “Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application” (FAA Form 8710-1).

X. For a Single Engine Airplane Rating:

Total Time: 250 hours of flight time as a pilot that consists of at least:
A. 100 hours in powered aircraft, of which 50 hours must be in airplanes.
B. 100 hours of pilot-in-command flight time, that includes at least–
1. 50 hours in airplanes; and
2. 50 hours in cross-country flying of which at least 10 hours must be in airplanes.
C. Dual: 20 hours of flight training on the Commercial Pilot areas of operation that includes at least–
1. 10 hours of instrument training of which at least 5 hours must be in a single engine airplane; (See Note 4)
2. 10 hours of training in a complex airplane or a turbine powered airplane;
3. 1 cross-country of 2 hours in a single engine airplane in day VFR conditions of a total straight line distance of more than 100 nm. from the departure point;
4. 1 cross-country of 2 hours in a single engine airplane in night VFR conditions of a total straight line distance of more than 100 nm. from the departure point;
5. 3 hours of flight training in a single engine airplane within the preceding 60 days prior to the practical test.

D. Solo: 10 hours of solo flight in a single engine airplane on the Commercial Pilot areas of operation, that
includes— (see Note 2)
1. One cross-country flight of not less than 300 nm. with landings with a min of 3 points, one of which is a straight line distance of more than 250 nm.; and
2. 5 hours in night VFR conditions with 10 takeoffs and 10 landings at a controlled airport.

XI. For a Multiengine Airplane Rating:

Total Time: 250 hours of flight time as a pilot that consists of at least:
A. 100 hours in powered aircraft, of which 50 hours must be in airplanes.
B. 100 hours of pilot-in-command flight time, that includes at least–
1. 50 hours in airplanes; and
2. 50 hours in cross-country flying of which at least 10 hours must be in airplanes.
C. Dual: 20 hours of flight training on the Commercial Pilot areas of operation that includes at least–
1. 10 hours of instrument training of which at least 5 hours must be in a multiengine airplane; (See Note 4)
2. 10 hours of training in a complex multiengine airplane or turbine powered multiengine airplane;
3. 1 cross-country of 2 hours in a multiengine airplane in day VFR conditions of a total straight line distance of more than 100 nm. from the departure point;
4. 1 cross-country of 2 hours in a multiengine airplane in night VFR conditions of a total straight line distance of more than 100 nm. from the departure point;
5. 3 hours of flight training in a multiengine airplane within the preceding 60 days prior to the practical test.
D. Solo or Performing PIC: 10 hours of solo flying or performing the duties as PIC with an instructor in a multiengine airplane on the Commercial Pilot areas of operation, that includes at least–(see Notes 3 and 7)
1. One cross-country flight of not less than 300 nm. with landings with a min of 3 points, one of which is a straight line distance of more than 250 nm.; and
2. 5 hours in night VFR conditions with 10 takeoffs and 10 landings at a controlled airport.

Instrument Rating

NOTE 9: Per § 61.65(a)(1), must “Hold at least a current private pilot certificate with an airplane, helicopter, or powered-lift rating appropriate to the instrument rating sought;”
XVIII. For all instrument ratings.
Total Time: Must have logged the following:
A. At least 50 hours of cross-country flying as a PIC, of which at least 10 hours must be in airplanes for an Instrument Airplane rating; and
B. Total of 40 hours of actual or simulated instrument time on the Instrument areas of operation, that includes at least–
1. Dual: 15 hours of instrument training with an instructor in the aircraft category, that includes at
least: (See Note 9)
a. 3 hours of the instrument training were within the preceding 60 days prior to the practical test; and
b. 1 IFR cross-country flight of more than 250 nm. (more than 100 nm. for helicopters) in the instrument-aircraft rating sought.
or, if for an
C. Additional instrument rating, 15 hours of instrument training with an instructor for the rating sought, that includes at least:
1. 1 IFR cross-country flight of more than 250 nm. (more than 100 nm. for helicopters) in the instrument-aircraft rating sought; and
2. 3 hours of the instrument training were within the preceding 60 days prior to the practical test.

Airline Transport Pilot Certification

NOTE 10: Pen and ink modifications can be made to the “Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application” FAA Form 87101 to show the SIC time performing the duties of PIC used in conjunction with the PIC time to meet the PIC aeronautical experience requirements. As for example, a simple pen entry of a slash or a dash (e.g., PIC / SIC. in the “Pilot in Command” box of Section III of FAA Form 87101 can be used to show PIC time vs. SIC time.
XIX. For an Airplane Ratings:
Total Time – 1,500 hours that includes at least–
A. 500 hours of cross-country flying;
B. 100 hours of night time;
C. 75 hours of instrument time; and
D. 250 hours in an airplane as a PIC, or as SIC performing the duties of PIC, or any combination thereof, that includes at least — (See Note 10)
1. 100 hours of cross-country flying; and
2. 25 hours of night time.

Source

If you are looking for a flight school to begin your career as pilot, here are some reasons to consider Aviator Flight Training Academy.

  • Licensed by the State of Florida Commission For Independent Education License #4155
  • Aviator Flight Training Academy is a Division of Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology, which is licensed by the State of Florida Commission for Independent Education and Accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges.
  • 27 Years in the Flight Training Industry
  • To date, Aviator has trained over 5000 pilots for the commercial airline industry
  • Only School Offering 200 Hours of Multi-Engine Time
  • Aviator is the only flight school that has a full 200 hours of multi-engine time included in our program
  • No Flight Training Devices (Simulators)
  • FTDs are not used towards your flight time for any ratings
  • Approved by the Federal Department of Education to offer Title IV Loans
  • Aviator has the ability to offer students federal funding on approved accredited programs
  • Job Placement Assistance with Regional Airlines
  • Aviator offers job placement assistance for our graduates
  • “A” Rating with United States Better Business Bureau
  • Classroom Environment – All classes taught in our educational center, NOT online

Contact Aviator or Schedule a Visit

How To Study And Prepare For Pilot Tests

September 26, 2013 Leave a comment

How To Study And Prepare For Pilot TestsYou should recognize the advantages of planning a definite study program and following it as closely as possible. Haphazard or disorganized study habits usually result in an unsatisfactory score on the knowledge test.

The ideal study program would be to enroll in a formal ground school course. This offers the advantages of a professional instructor as well as facilities and training aids designed for pilot instruction. Many of these schools use audiovisual aids or programmed instruction materials to supplement classroom instruction.

Aviator Flight Training Ground School

Location is very important when you are looking for a flight training school. Florida is a great place to earn your wings. The moderate and mild climate makes flight training a pleasure. The good weather allows you to log more flying hours faster, get your degree quicker and be on the way sooner to your new aviation career.

For more than 31 years Aviator has been the leader in multi-engine flight training. We have successfully trained pilots to earn more than 45,000 pilot airmen certificates. Our FAA-certified Part 141 and Part 61 approved flight programs provide students with the skills and experience demanded by today’s commercial aviation industry. Aviator is accredited by the ACCSC (Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges).

Our flight training programs are set in a structured environment to ensure the student receives the knowledge that is required to be a professional pilot. Our programs all offer a minimum of private through commercial ratings, with options for all three instructor ratings, as well as options to maximize multi-engine flight hours, Cross Country flying is coast-to-coast, if desired.

When you choose Aviator, you have the option to conduct ALL of your flight training in aircraft, or to reduce your cost by conducting a portion of your flight hours in an approved Part 141 FTD simulator.

This “hands-on” approach provides the best flight training environment for pilots of the future. We encourage training in actual instrument conditions. Flying at the Aviator is 24 hours-a-day, rain or shine. Aviator flight training programs offer more actual multi-engine time than any other school in the country. Our fleet of multi-engine aircraft are equipped up to GPS and EFIS Systems (Glass Cockpits).

Come and take a tour and see the Aviator difference.

If you are unable to attend a ground school, the self-study method can be satisfactory, provided you obtain the proper study materials and devote a reasonable amount of time to study. You should establish realistic periodic goals and, equally important, a target date for completion. Self-discipline is important because it is too easy to “put off” the study period for some other activity.

When To Take The Test

Experience has shown that the knowledge test is more meaningful, and is more likely to result in a satisfactory grade, if it is taken after beginning the flight portion of the training. For optimum benefit, it is recommended that the knowledge test be taken after the student has completed a solo cross-country flight. The operational knowledge gained by this experience can be used to advantage in the knowledge test.

Where To Take The Test

Computer testing centers have been certified to administer FAA knowledge tests. You will be charged a reasonable fee for the administration of FAA knowledge tests. You can locate a computer testing center online , or contact the local FSDO http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/field_offices/fsdo/for more information.

What The Test Items Are Like

Knowledge tests have only multiple-choice questions. You can practice for the test by reviewing the question bank of test questions. Source

Private Pilot Airplane (PAR) Sample Exam:

1. PLT025
Which statement relates to Bernoulli’s principle?
A) For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.
B) An additional upward force is generated as the lower surface of the wing deflects air downward.
C) Air traveling faster over the curved upper surface of an airfoil causes lower pressure on the top surface.

2. PLT008(Refer to figure 39.)
Determine the total distance required to land over a 50-foot obstacle.
Pressure altitude5,000 ft
Headwind 8 kts
Temperature 41 °F
Runway Hard surface
A) 837 feet.
B) 956 feet.
C) 1,076 feet.

3. PLT008 (Refer to figure 39.)
Determine the approximate landing ground roll distance.
Pressure altitude 5,000 ft
Headwind Calm
Temperature 101 °F
A) 445 feet.
B) 545 feet.
C) 495 feet.

4. PLT012 (Refer to figure 36.)
Approximately what true airspeed should a pilot expect with 65 percent maximum continuous power at 9,500 feet with a temperature of 36 °F below standard?
A) 178 MPH.
B) 181 MPH.
C) 183 MPH.

5. PLT124 (Refer to figure 8.)
What is the effect of a temperature increase from 35 to 50 °F on the density altitude if the pressure altitude remains at 3,000 feet MSL?
A) 1,000 -foot increase.
B) 1,100 -foot decrease.
C) 1,300 -foot increase.

If You Want To Be A Flight Instructor After Flight School

September 24, 2013 Leave a comment

If You Want To Be A Flight Instructor After Flight SchoolFlight instructors are responsible for teaching students how to fly in a variety of settings using methods that include textbook education, simulators and live flight training. Flight instructors use ground-school classes both to teach students the basics of flying an aircraft and to help them prepare for the written test they can expect to face when applying for their pilot’s license from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

After students complete textbook education, flight instructors often use simulators or dual-controlled aircraft to acquaint them with the experience of flying an aircraft. Finally, flight instructors accompany their students on live flights to complete their training. Some instructors specialize as examiners or check pilots and fly with applicants or pilots to ensure proficiency.

Job Duties

Flight instructors develop curricula, instruct students in a classroom setting, conduct training flights, determine student proficiency, report on student progress and develop new teaching methods. They are responsible for training students in subjects such as aircraft systems, operating procedures, handling emergencies, problem analysis, aircraft navigation, radio operation and aerodynamics.

Education and Career Requirements

Most flight instructors must have either Commercial Pilot Certification, which requires 250 flight hours, or Airline Transport Pilot Certification, which requires 1,500 hours, before applying to become Certified Flight Instructors. All certifications are overseen by the FAA. In order to gain certification as a flight instructor, it is necessary to be at least 18 years old, to be able to communicate fluently in English and to hold a pilot’s license for the type of aircraft that is appropriate to the flight instructor rating they seek. Other requirements–including passing knowledge and practical tests as well as demonstrating a number of total flight hours–also apply. A flight instructor must have rating for the type of aircraft used in student instruction. For specialty aircraft such as helicopters, the flight instructor must have at least five pilot-in-command hours logged for that particular make and model. Source

CFI Prospective For Pilot Students Who Want To Become CFI
Me? An Instructor?

Many student pilots and private pilots wonder about the feasibility of becoming a CFI one day. Well, that ad up above has your name on it! Let’s consider why becoming a flight instructor is a worthy mission for you to pursue right now.

We’ve already touched upon some reasons for becoming a CFI; your experience and dedication can benefit the industry. But there are other great reasons to become a flight instructor.

First, the old adage, “the best way to master a subject is to teach it,” is most definitely true. As an active CFI your knowledge and flight proficiency will rapidly exceed your greatest expectations as a Private Pilot. By teaching others you will truly learn to fly as a pro.

Next comes the reward of setting goals and achieving them. Many of us find ourselves sitting at home on a given day, thinking, “Gee, I wish there was a reason to go flying today.” Well, there is! Start working toward that CFI and you’ve got a meaningful personal and professional objective to justify the time, effort, and investment in continuing regular flying.

Then there’s the contribution to be made to the aviation community. Not only can you as a CFI personally impact the safety and proficiency of pilots you train, but there’s also the critically important role CFIs serve in recruiting new blood to aviation. The vast majority of new pilots sign up through the direct or indirect efforts of active CFIs, and we need your help carrying the flag.

Best of all, here’s your big chance to become an honest-to-goodness pro. Almost every active pilot harbors the dream of flying professionally. But for many reasons – age, family and lifestyle considerations, success in another occupation – only a certain percentage of pilots are in position to pursue, say, the captain’s seat in a Boeing or a LearJet. Well here’s your opportunity to fly professionally under schedule and conditions more or less of your own choosing, all while having someone pay you to do it.

What Does It Take to Qualify?

“But hold on a minute,” you say, “becoming a CFI takes years of full time study, and many thousands of flight hours, right?”
Not at all! With dedication and concentrated effort one can become a CFI relatively quickly. After earning your Private Pilot certificate, it takes only three more steps to become a primary flight instructor: an Instrument rating, the Commercial Pilot certificate, and then the Flight Instructor certificate itself. That’s certainly not a long path.
Recent regulations allow new Private Pilots to begin training for the instrument rating as soon as they like. (All CFI applicants must be instrument rated, even if they never plan to fly IFR.) The Instrument rating is roughly comparable in flight training hours to earning one’s Private certificate, and is something many of us go on to earn anyway. As with the Private, FAA Knowledge (written) and Practical (oral and flight) Tests are required. But once earning your instrument rating the route to flight instructor status can be a quick one.

You’ll need some flight experience to be eligible for your Commercial Pilot Certificate – 190 to 250 hours total flight time are required by the time you complete your training. But earning the rating itself requires only a fraction of the effort required to earn a Private; it’s entirely feasible to earn your Commercial in fifteen hours or less, if you set your mind to it. Again there are Knowledge and Practical tests to pass, and then you’re ready to pursue your Flight Instructor Certificate.

There is no minimum training requirement for the Flight Instructor certificate itself, but it will probably take you some fifteen to twenty flight hours to earn, plus a good deal of ground instruction. Along with Knowledge and Practical Tests there is an additional FAA written addressing, “Fundamentals of Instruction.”

The oral portion of the CFI Practical Test is notoriously challenging, but what’s covered there is largely material you’ve seen before, so keep sharp on the Private and Commercial Pilot material you’ve learned, and you’ll have little trouble mastering the CFI tests. Of course teaching technique is an important element of the test, too. If there’s one certificate where you should seek out a truly outstanding instructor, the CFI is it.

As for flight physicals, CFIs fall into the most favorable regulatory status of almost any professional pilot. With recent regulation changes, one can instruct with a third-class medical certificate, so if you qualify medically for a student pilot certificate you can instruct. What’s more, some instruction can even be conducted without a medical.
And other than the fact that you must be eighteen to earn your Commercial and therefore CFI Certificates, there are no age limits on instructing. This is one case where the experience and maturity of older pilots is desirable and unrestricted. You’re a sixty-year-old student pilot? Cool! Move right along and earn your CFI.

How Soon Can I Become an Instructor?

Before we get on with more privileges and benefits of instructing, here are a few tips to speed you along the path. First, many people don’t realize that they can become certificated as Ground Instructors – teaching ground school and signing off applicants for their written Knowledge tests – simply by passing several FAA written tests. That means you can start your instructing career almost immediately! Not only will ground instructing help pay for your flight training, but it’s great preparation for flight instructing. And Private Pilots can qualify to become Sport Pilot Instructors.

For those who plan to knock off their Commercial and CFI certificates in short order, here’s a little trick to accelerate your progress. Arrange with your CFI and pilot examiner to train for and take your Commercial Pilot Practical Test from the right seat. That way your right-seat flying skills will already be nailed when you dive into CFI training – doing it this way could save you five or even ten hours of training. Ask here at the flight school about the details for your situation. Source

Become A Flight Instructor with Aviator College

Faculty and Flight Training Instructors are hired directly from the ranks of our graduating student population and have more than 200 hours of multi-engine flight time.

The Faculty at Aviator College hold a minimum of a Bachelors Degree and teach all flight training, classroom based courses.

The Academy Flight Instructors are hired directly from the ranks of Aviator graduates. The Flight Training Instructors work one-on-one with their students in the air.

Students often complete the entire program with the same Flight Training Instructor, which allows them to find a comfortable relationship and learn faster. Flight Training Instructors are available to fly with students 24 hours-a-day, rain or shine.

We encourage our Flight Training Instructors to provide actual instrument flight time with their students whenever possible to gain real-world experience. Our Flight Training Instructors continue to grow in their skills while flying in the high density traffic operations of Florida’s airspace.

To speak with an instructor contact the college at 772-672-8222.

FAA Flight Safety and Pilot Experience

September 20, 2013 Leave a comment

FAA Flight Safety and Pilot ExperienceThe FAASTeam logo connotes safety of flight and conveys the concept that the FAASTeam is part of the FAA, implying we are authoritative, and suggests we are approachable by the aviation community.

FAASTeam Mission

To improve the Nation’s aviation safety record by conveying safety principles and practices through training, outreach, and education. At the same time, FAASTeam Managers and Program Managers will establish meaningful aviation industry alliances and encourage continual growth of a positive safety culture within the aviation community.

FAASTeam Organizational Structure

Each of the eight FAA Flight Standards regions now has a Regional FAASTeam Office dedicated to this unique safety program and managed by the Regional FAASTeam Manager (RFM). Based on the makeup of the aviation community in each region, the RFM has selected a group of FAASTeam Program Managers (FPM) with specific aviation specialties and assigned them to geographic areas of responsibility within the region. FPMs do not report to work where the RFM resides. They are “hosted” at FAA facilities within their assigned geographic area but they still report directly to the RFM.

This structure allows each regional FAASTeam to station employees throughout the region and still remain focused on its plan to reduce accidents.

FAASTeam Process for Planning to Reduce Accidents

The FAASTeam uses more data to decide what should be done to reduce accidents. Each Regional FAASTeam Office develops a business plan based on information compiled by FPMs from each of the region’s geographic areas. The data includes:

  • Accident/incident reports involving airmen from the area
  • Hazards identified by FAA Inspectors at local Flight Standards District Offices
  • Information from the local aviation community

Once the data is collected and analyzed, the FPMs develop tasks that they plan to accomplish, with the help of all their FAASTeam Members, in an effort to mitigate future accidents.

Relationships with the Aviation Community

The FAASTeam is “teaming” up with individuals and the aviation industry to create a unified effort against accidents and “tip” the safety culture in the right direction.

FAASTeam Members

A FAASTeam Member is anyone who makes a conscious effort to promote aviation safety and become part of the shift in safety culture. To become a member:

  • Sign-up at FAASafety.gov and take part in all it has to offer.
  • Pilots – participate in our new WINGS – Pilot Proficiency Program
  • Mechanics – participate in the new automated AMT Awards Program
  • Attend live FAASTeam seminars in your area
Pilot Experience Equals Airplane Safety

Why the experience level of pilots directly impacts the safety of your flight.

The A380 is arguably the world’s most sophisticated commercial aircraft—and it has to be, in order for just two pilots to operate it safely. It is truly a digital marvel, as are most of the new aircraft rolling off modern assembly lines. Today’s pilots gather loads of information at a glance from digital avionics and sophisticated systems-monitoring displays. But what happens if these systems fail? Does the newer generation of pilots have the air sense to handle an aircraft with multiple systems failures? The answer is uncertain and can only be answered with time. That said: In my opinion, an experienced pilot is the most important safety factor when problems arise.

As a pilot becomes more experienced, he thinks less about the “stick and throttle” part of the job and becomes more of a tactical or critical problem solver. The ability to handle both the technical and strategic aspects of the job comes from years and years of experience. The technical term for this type of thinking is “metacognition,” which can be defined as the process of knowing about knowing. Recent studies have revealed that it takes 20 to 25 years of experience to develop this type of mental processing. Aviators are continually challenged to make strategic decisions during our annual check flights.

The majority of pilots at the major airlines are in their 40s or older, with the average age around 48. Most of them earned their licenses flying aircraft with steam gauge technology, also known as round dial instrumentation (analog). As with any advance in technology, aircraft instrumentation has become simpler (digital) and can provide a pilot with an incredible amount of easily interpreted data. Even so, experience with flying older aircraft is invaluable because a pilot develops an air sense—flying by the seat of the pants—that comes only through repetitive flying. In essence, an analog pilot has the experience to fly a digital aircraft because the airplanes he used to fly were degraded in comparison with modern planes. If an airplane loses most of its digital displays, it is still an airplane and must be hand-flown to a safe landing.

A recent incident shows why experience and air sense are so important. On November 4, 2010, Qantas Flight 32 departed Singapore’s Changi Airport, bound for Sydney. As it was climbing through 7,000 feet, its number two engine suffered a catastrophic explosion commonly known as an uncontained engine failure. As the engine disintegrated, the second-stage turbine rotor threw blades and other metallic components against its protective cowling, rupturing part of it and puncturing portions of the wing and the fuselage. Engine shrapnel severed many of the delicate system components lying beneath the surface of the wing, crippling the superjumbo A380.
The aircraft’s cockpit displays showed no fewer than 43 error messages less than 60 seconds after the initial engine failure warning. The captain focused on prioritizing the error messages and assigning duties to the four other pilots as they wrestled the million-pound beast.

“Serendipitous” is an insufficient word to describe the fact that there were five highly experienced pilots in the cockpit on that memorable day: In addition to the captain, the copilot and the second officer, two additional pilots were onboard in a checking capacity. Together, they had over 140 years of flying experience (71,000 combined flying hours). They saved hundreds of lives onboard the aircraft and possibly thousands more on the ground because of their experience, air sense and systems knowledge. Source Chris Cooke

Pilot Training Program With Aviator Flight Training Academy 259 Flight Hours

Aviator Flight Training Academy offers professional pilot training programs with a minimum of 200 hours of multi-engine time. The flight school has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator), large classrooms and individual briefing rooms.

Schedule a Visit

WINGS – Pilot Proficiency Program

September 19, 2013 Leave a comment

WINGS - Pilot Proficiency ProgramFAA Safety Briefing is the safety policy voice for the non-commercial general aviation community. The magazine’s objective is to improve safety by:

  • making the community aware of FAA resources
  • helping readers understand safety and regulatory issues, and
  • encouraging continued training

September 18–The September/October 2013 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on aviation citizenship. Articles highlight the shared values, customs, and culture we share as citizens of the general aviation community.
Among the feature articles in this issue include:

  • “To Be, Rather Than to Seem” –a look at how a personal SMS can help make you a good aviation citizen (p. 10)
  • “Be Your Fellow Pilot’s Keeper”–how to develop safety intervention strategies (p. 14)
  • “A Heading Set for Success”–a Q&A with FAA Administrator Michael Huerta (p. 20)
Encouraging Continued Pilot Training With WINGS

The WINGS – Pilot Proficiency Program is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.

The objective of the WINGS Program is to address the primary accident causal factors that continue to plague the general aviation community. By focusing on this objective, we hope to reduce the number of accidents we see each year for the same causes. As you will see, it is not a simple “Award” program but is instead a true proficiency program, designed to help improve our skills and knowledge as pilots.

The WINGS – Pilot Proficiency Program is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.
You select (in your Airman Profile) the category and class of aircraft in which you wish to receive training and in which you wish to demonstrate your flight proficiency. Requirements for each aircraft category and class include specific subjects and flight maneuvers. To ensure you receive a well-rounded learning experience, only certain flight activities fulfill specific credit requirements. More information about how these subject areas are selected is available on your MY WINGS page.

The program encourages an on-going training program that provides you an opportunity to fly on a regular basis with an authorized flight instructor. The program is most effective if the training is accomplished regularly throughout the year, thus affording you the opportunity to fly in different seasons and in different flight conditions.

Reviewing and refreshing your knowledge is just as important as actual flying. To meet this goal, we provide you many opportunities to complete online courses, attend seminars and other events, and participate in webinars. Many 3rd party activities, such as those offered by AOPA, ASA, Sporty’s, Gleim Publications, and others, qualify for WINGS credit and will indicate such credit on their web site.

In almost all cases, arrangements have been made with the FAASTeam to automatically provide WINGS credit after the activity. However, please allow at least 24 hours before inquiring about WINGS credits. Remember, if you have questions about a course or activity, check with the provider.

 If you have a question about the WINGS Program, contact faasafety@faa.gov

You may earn as many phases in a level as you wish.

Basic Level.

This level is designed for those pilots who want to establish a recurrent training program that will provide them a higher level of proficiency than merely preparing for a normal Flight Review as required by 14 CFR 61.56. In addition, because the Basic Level addresses primary accident causal factors, every pilot is required to complete a phase at the Basic Level at least once every 12 calendar months. This ensures pilots are aware of accident causal factors and possible mitigation strategies.

Note that when you earn a phase of WINGS at any Level, you meet the requirements for a Flight Review (reference 61.56(e)).
To earn a phase at the Basic level, you must complete three knowledge credits of instruction and demonstrate proficiency when required as shown in the respective PTS. These knowledge areas are designed to cover current subject matter that the FAASTeam has determined to be critical areas of operation, which in the preceding months have been found to be major causal factors in aircraft accidents.

A pilot must also complete three credits of flight activities. Completion of a credit of flight for this level of flight requires demonstration of proficiency in the Area of Operation(s) required for the credit sought, as stated in the appropriate Practical Test Standards. .

This level requires the use of the Practical Test Standard (PTS) for the pilot certificate held or the Private Pilot PTS, whichever is lower, for the category and class of aircraft used.
A current listing of course material, subject matter, FAASTeam seminars, activities, flight requirements, and credit values can be found by going to your “My WINGS” page when you are registered on FAASafety.gov. This list may change periodically, reflecting the dynamic nature of aircraft accident causal factors and FAASTeam emphasis areas.

Advanced Level.

This level is designed for those pilots who want a training program that will take them a step above Basic. It affords you the opportunity, in concert with your instructor, to tailor the training to fit more specific needs.

To complete a phase of WINGS at the Advanced level, you must simultaneously complete or already hold the Basic level as outlined previously.

The Advanced level requires an additional three flight credits and three knowledge credits using the Commercial PTS for the category and class of aircraft used, or the Private PTS when there is not a Commercial PTS, or if completion of the Basic level used the Sport or Recreational PTS, the Private PTS will be used for this level.
A current listing of course material, subject matter, FAASTeam seminars, flight requirements, activities, and credit values can be found by going to your “My WINGS” page when you are registered on FAASafety.gov. This list will change periodically, reflecting the dynamic nature of aircraft accident causal factors and FAASTeam emphasis areas.

Master Level.

This level is designed to give even more flexibility to your needs for specialized training. While most often this level will require the use of higher PTS standards, it will also allow for the addition of specialized equipment and flight environment training scenarios. To obtain the Master level, you must simultaneously complete or already hold a phase at the Advanced level as outlined previously.

The Master level requires an additional three flight credits and three knowledge credits using the Commercial or ATP PTS for the category and class of aircraft used and the Instrument Rating PTS, if one is available for the category and class of aircraft used. A Light Sport Aircraft (LSA) may not be used at this level.

A current listing of course material, subject matter, FAASTeam seminars, activities, flight requirements and credit values can be found by going to your “My WINGS” when you are registered on FAASafety.gov. This list may change periodically, reflecting the dynamic nature of aircraft accident causal factors and FAASTeam emphasis areas.

Professional Pilot Training Programs in Florida

The programs at Aviator Flight School are designed to provide what the airline industry demands of future commercial pilots. The training you will receive at Aviator is one of the most intensive and challenging programs offered in aviation flight training today.

During your flight training you will fly a total of 259 hours, of which up to 200 hours will be in a multi-engine aircraft. The ground school portion is in a structured classroom environment. As the shortage of pilots continues to grow, Aviator College is consistently meeting with major air carriers to determine the flight training and education that they require.

You will receive a minimum of 643 instructional hours for the Professional Pilot Program. The instructional hours includes all ground and flight training. 6 months of housing is included in the price of the program. If you come with a Private Pilot License 5 months will be included in the price of the Program.

Upon completion of your flight training Aviator College encourages the graduating student to apply to stay on as a flight instructor.

Contact Aviator

Your Future As Commercial Pilot With Aviation Degree

September 16, 2013 Leave a comment

Your Future As Commercial Pilot With Aviation DegreeThe reasons for getting a college degree are as varied as the degrees offered, but if you’re considering an aviation career, a degree will improve your chances for employment. Because pilots and maintenance technicians spend their careers in recurrent training, employers favor applicants who have demonstrated their ability to learn. More than 90 percent of pilots hired by all major airlines, for example, hold a four-year (bachelor’s) degree. A college degree is more than a “ticket” to employment, it’s an opportunity to broaden your knowledge and skills, enabling you to advance and adapt to a rapidly changing industry.

What Types of Degrees Are Available in Aviation Technology?

A degree in Aviation Technology prepares you for a variety of Aviation careers, including those in maintenance, engineering, air traffic control and piloting. Degrees are offered at various levels through colleges, universities, vocational schools and online institutions.

Aviation Technology Degrees

On its website, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), http://www.faa.gov, lists over 100 accredited colleges and universities with Aviation programs. These institutions offer a variety of degree options, from a Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical Management Technology to an Associate of Applied Science in Aviation Technology. While the programs may vary in focus and depth of training, most will include basic Aviation Technology concepts, including:

  • Aircraft operations
  • Effects of weather
  • FAA and other regulations 
  • Navigation
  • Air traffic control
  • Basic aircraft systems
  • Associate Degrees in Aviation Technology

An associate degree program generally lasts about two years and prepares students for entry-level employment in the Aviation industry or for continued study in Aviation. Concentrations may include Aviation maintenance, air traffic control or airport management.

Bachelor Degrees in Aviation Technology

A bachelor degree program will include a broad range of educational requirements in addition to Aviation instruction. Most bachelor degree programs last for four years. Programs are available for professional piloting, airport management, airline management and aviation engineering.

Associate Degree Programs

Associate programs have many advantages such as smaller campuses and classes, and lower tuition. Because they are “community” colleges, you don’t have to pay room and board. Offsetting these advantages is the fact that because of their size, most community colleges don’t offer a full range of aviation programs. If you are considering an associate degree as the first step to a bachelor’s, some of your college credits may not transfer to the four-year school (more on this later).

Two-year degrees fall into three categories. An associate of arts (AA) is generally a transfer-type degree where most of your course work (general studies of such subjects as English, math, etc.) counts toward a bachelor’s. Most aviation programs lead to either an associate of science (AS) or an associate of applied science (AAS).
Designed to meet unique technical requirements, flight, electronics/avionics, and maintenance are the three most common associate programs. They generally require around 60 semester hours, with 15-20 hours devoted to general studies. Some schools also offer programs in aviation management, airport administration, air traffic control, and other specialized programs targeting specific segments of aviation.

Flight, sometimes called professional flight or career pilot, focuses on flight operations. This is where you learn to fly and earn your commercial pilot certificate and instrument rating, in addition to a degree. Some colleges have options for a multi-engine rating and/or a flight instructor certificate, depending on your specific career plans.
Electronic/avionics programs offer basic and advanced electronics theory, preparing you for the manufacturing, maintenance, troubleshooting, and testing of communication/navigation equipment. Graduates should qualify for the FCC General Telephone license. Some programs have two options – one for avionics (aircraft-based) and one for electronics (ground-based). Avionics prepares you for positions with equipment manufacturers and facilities that install and maintain the equipment. Electronics is primarily designed for those who want to work for the FAA, which maintains the nation’s communications and navigation systems. (There are some private-sector opportunities in this area, too).

Maintenance programs are designed to meet the minimum requirements of Federal Aviation Regulation Part 147 covering maintenance schools and earn graduates an FAA Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) Maintenance Technician certificate. They concentrate on the theoretical and practical knowledge of maintenance and repair, as well as relevant technical documentation methods, specifications and standards. Graduates who earn their A&P certificate will be qualified to work for an air carrier or general aviation maintenance facility.

If you plan to transfer to a four-year program, carefully evaluate the requirements for the bachelor’s degree you seek and relate them to your associate courses. Selecting a four-year school before starting your associate program and discussing the bachelor’s requirements with its admissions office will help you tailor your associate program to ensure the greatest transfer of college credit. Four-year schools sometimes classify courses as “upper division,” meaning they must be taken in your junior or senior years. Beware. If you take an upper-division course at a two-year school, the four-year school may not give you credit for it. Source

Aviator College Flight Training Degree

Aviator College is approved through the Accrediting Commission for Career Schools & Colleges, the State of Florida’s Commission for Independent Education and the Federal Department of Education to award two-year Associate’s Degrees in Aeronautical Science with a concentration in Flight Instruction.

To earn the Associate’s Degree in Aeronautical Science the student must earn a minimum of 73 credit hours to include: 18 General Education credits, 24 credit hours of lower division ground schools and flight training, 25 credit hours of upper division training, and 6 elective credits. Aviation courses are listed in order of progression.

First Year Flight Training Courses:
  • AVT1100 Private Pilot Ground School
  • AVF1100 Private Pilot Flight Training
  • AVT1200 Multi-Engine Pilot Ground School
  • AVF1200 Multi-Engine Flight Training
  • AVT1300 Instrument Rating Ground School
  • AVF1300 Instrument Rating Flight Training
  • AVT1400 Commercial Pilot Ground School
  • AVF1400 Commercial Pilot Flight Training
  • AVF1400L Commercial Pilot Flight Training Lab

Credit Hour Total: 24

Aviation Electives (2 required)
  • AVG1100 Aerodynamics
  • AVG1200 Aviation Meteorology
  • AVG1300 Aviation Law
  • AVG1400 Aviation Safety

Credit Hour Total: 6

Second Year Training Courses
  • AVT1700 Flight Instructor Airplane Ground School
  • AVT1800 Flight Instructor Instrument Rating Ground School
  • AVF1700 Flight Instructor Airplane Multi-Engine Flight Training
  • AVF1800 Flight Instructor Airplane Instrument Flight Training
  • AVF1900 Flight Instructor Airplane Single-Engine Flight Training
  • AVG2300 Pilot Career Planning and Interviewing
  • AVG2100 CRJ Simulator Training
  • AVG2200 Jet Transition and CRJ 200/700/900 Systems
  • AVI2100 Aviation Internship I
  • AVI2200 Aviation Internship II

Credit Hour Total: 25

General Education Courses

General Education course are offered by Indian River State College (IRSC), through an articulation agreement or can be completed at an accredited college of your choice. The courses listed below are available at IRSC. For a complete list of elective options please contact an admission representative. All courses taken outside of Aviator College must be submitted on official transcripts for transfer credit evaluation before the diploma can be awarded.

  • ENC1101 English Composition
  • SPC1608 Introduction to Speech Communications
  • MAC1105 College Algebra
  • Humanities Elective: PHI2630 Introduction to Ethics or
  • PHI1103 Critical & Creative Thinking, recommended
  • Social Science Elective: GEA2000 World Regional Geography or
  • PSY2012 Introduction to Psychology, recommended
  • Natural Science Elective: MET1001 Weather and Climate or PHY1020 Principles of Physics or PSC1341 Physical Science, recommended

Credit Hour Total: 18

Aviator graduates wishing to continue on for a four-year Bachelor’s Degree may benefit from the articulation agreement that is in place between Aviator College and Everglades University. This agreement is for Aviator College graduates who complete their Associate of Science degrees in Aeronautical Science and who apply and are accepted into program leading to a Bachelor of Science in Aviation Management or Bachelor of Science in Aviation Technology. For information regarding the specifics of this agreement please contact Aviator College’s Registrar.

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact the college at 772-672-8222.

Checklist For Students Who Want To Learn To Fly

September 13, 2013 Leave a comment

Checklist For Students Who Want To Learn To FlyYou must make your own decision on where to obtain flight training. Once you have decided on a general location, you might want to make a checklist of things to look for in a school. By talking to pilots and reading articles in flight magazines, you can make your checklist and evaluate a school. Your choice of a flight school might depend on whether you are planning on obtaining a recreational or private certificate or whether you intend to pursue a career as a professional pilot. Another consideration is whether you will train part-time or full-time.

Most airports have pilot training available, either by flying schools or individual flight instructors. A school will usually provide a wide variety of training aids, special facilities, and greater flexibility in scheduling. A number of colleges and universities also provide pilot training as a part of their curricula.

1. Find a Flight School.

Use the Find a Flight School search to find a school near you. If there’s more than one near you, shop around and use the comparison chart based on the following categories to make an informed decision where to do your flight training.

2. Visit the School.

You may choose to call each flight school /FlightSchool to discuss your interest in flight training, but it’s also a good idea to visit in person. Call ahead to ensure a flight instructor will be available to speak with you, give you a tour of the facilities, and show you the airplanes the school uses for training. You can either schedule your introductory flight while you’re there, or first visit other schools and then schedule your flight once you’ve decided on a school. Your intro flight will include discussion with a flight instructor before the flight and then 30 to 60 minutes of flying. You can expect to pay between $79 and $129.

3. Go Flying!

During your introductory flight, your flight instructor will be sitting beside you with another set of flight controls, but you’ll be in the pilot’s seat! This is your first flight lesson, and you’ll see what it’s like to visually inspect the aircraft before flight, take off, fly, land, park, and shutdown! You’ll probably fly a popular training airplane like a Cessna 172, Piper Warrior, or Diamond Katana. Your flight will last about 30 minutes and you can even log that time in your logbook so it counts toward the required flight time for your private pilot certificate!

4. Schedule Flight Lessons.

When you make the decision to learn to fly, your training is done when it’s convenient for you. Fly before or after work, on weekends, whenever you want so you can still maintain work and family commitments. Discuss this with a flight instructor to be sure that your schedules are compatible. Source

Not all flight training schools are the same. There are over 1400 of them in this country so there is a big selection out there and finding the right flight training school can be difficult. Location is very important when you are looking for a flight training school. Florida is a great place to earn your wings. The moderate and mild climate makes flight training a pleasure. The good weather allows you to log more flying hours faster, get your degree quicker and be on the way sooner to your new aviation career.

Florida Flight School

Aviator Flight Training Academy offers professional pilot training programs with a minimum of 200 hours of multi-engine time. The flight school has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator), large classrooms and individual briefing rooms.

For more than 31 years Aviator has been the leader in multi-engine flight training. We have provided over 5000 professional pilots to the airline industry, both nationally and worldwide, through our Professional Pilot Flight Training Programs. Our FAA-certified Part 141 approved flight programs provide students with the skills and experience demanded by today’s commercial aviation industry. Aviator is accredited by the ACCSC (Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges).

Our Professional Pilot Program is set in a flight training, structured environment to ensure the student receives the knowledge that is required to be a professional pilot. This program is from 0 hours to over 250 hours, of which 200 hours will be multi-engine time. The program includes Private Pilot Single Engine through the Multi-Engine Flight Instructor Certificate. Cross Country flying is coast-to-coast, if desired.

When you choose Aviator, all flight training is logged in aircraft. Our Flight Training Devices (FTDs) are used for ground training purposes only. NO FTDs (SIMULATORS) ARE USED FOR FLIGHT TIME TOWARDS YOUR RATINGS!

Schedule a Visit
Talk To A Flight Instructor. Call 772-672-8222
Contact Aviator