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Posts Tagged ‘aviation career’

Tactical And Operational Errors in Pilot’s Decision Making Process

Tactical And Operational Errors in Pilot’s Decision Making ProcessPilot error refers to any action or decision – or lack of proper action – made by a pilot that plays a role in an accident. This may include a simple mistake, a lapse in judgment or failure to exercise due diligence. There are two types of pilot errors according to Aviation Safety Magazine:

  1. Tactical errors, which are related to a pilot’s poor actions or decisions, often caused by fatigue, inebriation or lack of experience
  2. Operational errors, related to problems with flight instruction and training.

In fact, pilot error is the leading cause of commercial airline accidents, with close to 80% percent of accidents caused by pilot error, according to Boeing. The other 20% are mainly due to faulty equipment and unsafe, weather-related flying conditions.

Although policies put in place to reduce pilot error are not universal across the world, there are varying guidelines about how long a pilot can captain a flight, how many co-pilots should be present and how many hours a pilot can fly before taking mandatory breaks. There are also varying guidelines about how many hours of training pilots must complete, below what altitude they should not hand over control of a plane and when they should abort landings.

“Pilot judgment is the process of recognizing and analyzing all available information about oneself, the aircraft and the flying environment, followed by the rational evaluation of alternatives to implement a timely decision which maximizes safety. Pilot judgment thus involves one’s attitudes toward risk-taking and one’s ability to evaluate risks and make decisions based upon one’s knowledge, skills and experience. A judgment decision always involves a problem or choice, an unknown element, usually a time constraint, and stress. ” (Transport Canada: Judgment Training Manual).

The causal factor in about 80% to 85% of civil aviation accidents; is the human element, in other words, pilot error, a poor decision or a series of poor decisions made by the pilot-in-command. This concept is known as the poor judgment chain. One poor decision increases the probability of another and as the poor judgment chain grows, the probability of a safe flight decreases. The judgment training program teaches techniques; for breaking the chain by teaching the pilot to, recognize the combination of events that result in an accident and to deal with the situation correctly in time to prevent the accident from occurring.

How a pilot handles his or her responsibilities as a Pilot depends on attitude. Attitudes are learned. They can be developed through training into a mental framework that encourages good pilot judgment.

The pilot decision making training program is based on recognition of five, hazardous attitudes.

  1. Anti-authority. This attitude is common in those who do not like anyone telling them what to do.
  2. Resignation. Some people do not see themselves as making a great deal of difference in what happens to them and will go along with anything that happens.
  3. Impulsivity. Some people need to do something, anything, immediately without stopping to think about what is the best action to take.
  4. Invulnerability. Some people feel that accidents happen to other people but never to themselves. Pilots who think like this are more likely to take unwise risks.
  5. Macho. Some people need to always prove that they are better than anyone else and take risks to prove themselves and impress others.

Pilots who learn to recognize these hazardous attitudes in themselves can also learn how to counteract them, can learn to control their first instinctive response and can learn to make a rational judgment based on good common sense.

The DECIDE acronym was developed to assist a pilot in the decision making process.

D – detect change.
E – estimate the significance of the change.
C – choose the outcome objective.
l – identify plausible action options.
D – do the best action.
E – evaluate the progress.

Using the DECIDE process requires the pilot to contemplate the outcome of the action taken. The successful outcome should be the action that will result in no damage to the aircraft or injury to the occupants.

When a pilot receives a license to fly, he is being given the privilege to use public airspace and air navigation facilities. He is expected to adhere to the rules and to operate an aircraft safely and carefully. He is expected to use good judgment and act responsibly. Decision- making is a continuous adjustive process that starts before take-off and does not stop until after the final landing is made safely. Positive attitudes toward flying, learned judgment skills, will improve a pilot’s chances of having a long and safe flying career. Source

The I’M SAFE Checklist

Evaluating our personal airworthiness can be a difficult and demanding task. One tool to help make that assessment is the I’M SAFE checklist. Each letter represents one of six important factors affecting our ability to fly safely and engage in effective decision making. If you find yourself deficient in any of these areas, your decision-making ability may be compromised, and the no-go decision should be made.

Illness-Any form of illness can affect our ability to safely operate an aircraft. Remember that the symptoms of colds and other minor illnesses can be exacerbated by changes in pressure that result from changes in altitude. Sinus blockage caused by a head cold, for example, can result in severe vertigo. If you wouldn’t be able to pass an FAA medical exam, or if you have any condition that might alter your ability to safely operate an aircraft, the only safe choice is not to fly.

Medication-On the heels of illness is medication. Pilots are often tempted to use over-the-counter remedies to mask the effects of illnesses such as colds, but these remedies may have side effects that severely affect our judgment and decision making. If you are considering flying while taking any medication, first consult your aviation medical examiner.

Stress-Numerous forms of stress can alter our decision-making ability. Remember that the psychological stresses of work, school, family, or personal life are carried with you into the cockpit and can degrade your performance. Physical stress such as hot or cold temperature, high humidity, noise, vibration, and turbulence can take their toll on your decision-making ability. Hard work and the resulting soreness and fatigue can conspire against us as well. Stresses are also cumulative, so before you decide to fly, consider all the stresses acting upon you and the potential cumulative effect.

Alcohol-All pilots should know better than to mix alcohol with flying. The federal aviation regulations prohibit flying within eight hours of drinking alcoholic beverages, when under the influence of alcohol (or other drugs), or any time blood alcohol levels exceed .04 percent. Remember, too, that many cold remedies include alcohol as an active ingredient, so be certain not to use these before flying.

Fatigue-It’s difficult to think clearly and rationally when you’re tired. Mental abilities as well as motor coordination can be severely compromised when a pilot is tired. If you haven’t had adequate rest, don’t fly.

Eating-Nutrition is another important factor that contributes to mental processes, including decision making. If you haven’t been eating properly or drinking enough fluids, don’t expect to be a safe pilot. Your body cannot perform its best if it doesn’t have the nutrients and fluids it needs. source

Pilot Training in Florida

The programs at Aviator Flight School are designed to provide what the airline industry demands of future commercial pilots. The training you will receive at Aviator is one of the most intensive and challenging programs offered in aviation flight training today.

Schedule a Visit
Contact Aviator
Speak with Flight Instructor, call 772-672-8222.

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Study Aviation in US Based College

Study Aviation in US Based CollegeDeciding to study in the international country is a serious undertaking. Living, studying and working in a foreign country permits students to become more independent and cultured, while also fostering their cross-cultural and interpersonal communication skills. To decide if it is the best option for you, consider carefully how it will fit into your long-term educational and professional plans.

There are hundreds of colleges, universities and flight schools in the US that offer international students degrees, certificates, ratings or diplomas in aviation. In addition to location, cost and size, the most important criteria to consider is whether or not it has the aviation degree program of your choice. There are many different types of aviation degree programs to choose from and your decision will be based on the type of career you want to achieve.
Foreign students may study full time at learning institutions approved by USCIS, including American language schools, high schools, universities and other institutions of higher education.

If your main purpose of travel to the U.S. is tourism but you also want to take studies of less than 18 hours per week, you may be able to do so on a visitor visa. If, however, your studies will be more than 18 hours per week, you must secure an F-1 or M-1 student visa. F-1 student visas are granted to academic and language students for the full duration of their studies. M-1 student visas are issued to vocational students for up to 1 year of studies.
To learn about financial aid, student visas, and required tests, explore the resources described below.

Financial Aid Eligibility

Most foreign citizens are not eligible for federal student aid from the U.S. Department of Education. There are, however, some instances in which noncitizens may be eligible for financial aid from the U.S. federal government. Visit StudentAid.gov/eligibility/non-us-citizens to learn more.  You also should check with your country’s government and with the college you plan to attend to see what aid they might be able to offer you.

Admissions Tests

Most U.S. schools require the TOEFL exam for nonnative English speakers, while many undergraduate institutions also require you to take the SAT or the ACT test. Visit StudentAid.gov/prepare-for-college/tests for information about the SAT and ACT, and visit http://www.toefl.org for information about the TOEFL.

Student Visas

If you are coming to the U.S. primarily for tourism, but want to take a short course of study of fewer than 18 hours per week, you may do so on a tourist visa. Otherwise, you will need to obtain a student visa. In most countries, first time student visa applicants are required to appear for an in-person interview.
Each embassy and consulate sets its own interview policies and procedures regarding student visas. Consult the U.S. embassy website for your country for specific application instructions. source

Is an Aviation Degree Right for You

One of the more popular fields of study nowadays is aviation. Many international students have been flocking to the degree path in hopes of a career in the air. While the prospects are exciting, international students should ask themselves if a degree in aviation right for them.

Many students decide to study aviation in the US. While some hope to start careers as pilots, others want to work in a vibrant industry. There are several different degrees available in aviation, and international students should make sure they know which degree is best for them. Are you looking to fly? Do you want to be in aviation maintenance or aviation management? Are you interested in air traffic control? These are all questions that students should explore. While they all are amazing opportunities, all veterans in the aviation field will tell prospective students one thing: you need to have a passion in order to be successful.

Degree Programs

There are a number of different and exciting degree programs available when studying aviation in the US. Students should try to find a university that has a strong aviation program that has a proven history of putting students directly into aviation careers. One of the more popular degree paths in aviation is aviation management. These programs prepare students for leadership roles in the administrative departments of major airlines and aviation companies. They prepare students for staff and executive roles. Students also have the opportunity to concentrate in a specific subject with the management program. These subjects include:

  • Airport Management
  • Airline Management
  • International Air Transport Management
  • Flight Operations
  • General Management

Another popular degree is Aviation Maintenance. Aircraft mechanics are very specialized in their discipline, and their expertise is hard to find. Student with Aviation Maintenance degrees have great prospects. Students who earn this degree also are usually awarded the Aircraft and Powerplant Maintenance Certificate, a necessary designation that shows expertise in aviation mechanics. The degree program teaches students the necessary information and complex issues of aircraft maintenance. Students have the opportunity to concentrate in Flight, Electronics and other specialized fields.

One of the most popular aviation degrees is in the field of Air Traffic Control or Air Traffic Management. Air traffic controllers are very highly paid employees, and the need for them is increasing over time. Students will be instructed in the nuances and regulations involved with air traffic control and also work on management and leadership skills within the field.

Curriculum

The curriculum of an aviation concentrated degree can be tough for some international students. The degree path is very technical in nature. Like other degree paths, aviation based degree programs require sixty credits of general education requirements. These courses cover courses in communications, humanities, some social sciences, mathematics, and physical sciences. The actual course credits will start with some introductory aeronautics courses. Student will need to take courses in aeronautic science and others in computer based classes. In addition, the aviation program requires deep knowledge of mathematics and physics. Students will re required to take classes in Statistics and Calculus.

Depending on the actual degree, courses may differ. Aviation administration degrees will have a lot of courses in business like Management, Accounting, Corporate Finance and International Business. Aviation Maintenance students will instead have a lot of classes in technical areas. Students should expect to take classes in aviation mathematics and physics, fundamentals of electricity, and aircraft regulations. In their concentrations, students will face many others courses like Private Flights, Commercial Flights, Aviation Technical Operations, and Aerodynamics. Air Traffic Control majors will have many courses in mathematics because it is one of the most important aspects of the degree. Students will begin to dive into the core courses in air traffic control, that teach the fundamentals of air traffic control. Some courses include Aviation Traffic I and II, Aviation Safety and Aviation Weather. source

Aviator College Degree Program
Approved by the FAA for a Restricted ATP Certificate at 1250 hours

2 year Associates Degree Program
The Aeronautical Science Program prepares the graduate for a career in the aviation industry by providing a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, aeronautical sciences, aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry. The graduate will receive an Associate of Science Degree from Aviator College with flight ratings from private pilot through commercial, with Flight Instructor ratings. This training is necessary to obtain employment, and by completing the associate’s degree you will set yourself apart from other applicants since a degree is preferred in the airline industry.

The flight portion of the program consists of a minimum of 565 flight hours and more multi-engine time than any other college or flight school today. Our large multi-engine fleet is equipped with Garmin 430s, and ASPEN EFIS is being introduced. Single engine fleet consists of Piper Warrior III with all glass (EFIS systems). Ground school is taught in a classroom environment.

International Department
Aviator College Enrollment Instructions
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ATP Pilot Comes With Highest Responsibility and Extensive Flight Training

ATP Pilot Comes With Highest Responsibility and Extensive Flight TrainingAn airline transport pilot (ATP) is a person who acts as the pilot in command of a commercial aircraft. The airline transport pilot certification is the highest level of certification a pilot can earn, and once the pilot has earned such certification, he or she can operate as the pilot in command of any aircraft that carries cargo or passengers. The pilot is solely responsible for the safety of the aircraft, cargo, and passengers on board.

Once fully certified and licensed, the airline transport pilot will be responsible for all operations of the airplane before, during, and immediately after the flight. This means inspecting the plane before the flight, preparing the plane for departure from a gate, preparing the plane for takeoff, operating the plane during flight and addressing any issues that may arise during flight, landing the plane, taxiing the plane to a gate, and shutting down the plane after the flight. The safety of the plane, passengers, and cargo is the primary responsibility of the airline transport pilot.

ATP Eligibility
  1. To be eligible for an Airline Transport Pilot certificate, you must know English and:
  2. Be at least 23 years of age; AND
  3. Be of good moral character.
You must already hold one of the following pilot certificates:

If US certified: at least a commercial pilot with an instrument rating; OR

ICAO country: ATP or commercial pilot with an instrument rating, without limitations, subject to background check.

New ATP Pilot Certification Requirements Issued By FAA

On July 7, 2013, the FAA released the Final Rule for pilot certification and qualification requirements for air carrier operations –commonly referred to as the “First Officer Qualification (FOQ) Rule” or “1,500 Hour Rule.” The Final Rule was published in the Federal Register on 7/15/2013, effective immediately.

Pilots applying for an air transport pilot (ATP) certificate and those intending to serve as first officers for airlines will be the ones most affected by the new rule. But it will also affect pilots wanting to serve as pilot in command in Part 121 air carrier operations, part 91 subpart K operations, or Part 135 operations because of changes to requirements for obtaining an ATP certificate.

Pilots pursuing an ATP certificate after July 31, 2014, in addition to having 1,500 hours, will have to complete a new, yet-to-be developed, ATP certification training program. The program, consisting of 30 hours of ground and 10 hours of simulator training, must be completed prior to being eligible to take the ATP written and practical tests. The 10 hours of simulator training will include six hours of training in a level C or D (full-motion) simulator. According to the rule, this course will only be offered through Part 141, 142, 135, or 121 certificate holders, not allowing for Part 61 flights schools to develop courses and provide the training.

The new rule also establishes a new ATP certificate with restricted privileges for multiengine airplane only. The restricted ATP certificate can only be used to serve as a first officer at an air carrier. To obtain that certificate an applicant must be at least 21 years old, hold a commercial pilot certificate with an instrument rating, complete an ATP certification training program, and pass the ATP written and knowledge tests. For the restricted ATP certificate, applicants do get some relief as they are required to have at least 750 hours total time as a military pilot; at least 1,000 hours total time and a bachelor’s degree with an aviation major; at least 1,250 hours total time and an associate’s degree with an aviation major; or 1,500 hours total time as pilot. Source

ATP Pilot Job Description

Airline pilots fly airplanes or helicopters transporting passengers and cargo.
Usually the cockpit crew is made up of two pilots. The more experience is the captain supervising other crew members. The copilot, often called the first office, along with the pilot share a range of duties including monitoring instruments and communicating with air traffic controllers. Some small aircrafts only have one pilot and some large ones have a third—the flight engineer. New technology can take on many flight tasks and now almost all new aircraft fly with just two pilots who use computerized controls.

Airline pilots must plan flights before departure. They also need to check their aircraft to ensure everything is running properly and that baggage or cargo is properly loaded. They work with aviation weather forecasters and flight dispatchers to determine conditions at their destination and en route. They then choose a speed, altitude and route to provide the smoothest, most economical and safest flight possible. When there is poor visibility, airline pilots fly under instrument flight rules using an instrument flight plan with air traffic control so it can coordinate with other air traffic.

The hardest part of the job for airline pilots is the takeoff and landing. The two pilots must work in close coordination so that the pilot can focus on the runway or the direction of the wind, while the copilot scans the instrument panel and checks to see when the plane reaches takeoff speed for example. The two usually switch back and forth flying each leg from takeoff to landing.

In good weather flights are usually routine. Airline pilots steer their plane using autopilot and flight management computer systems. They scan the instruments to check their systems. If they hit turbulence or want to find a stronger tailwind for example, they may request a change in altitude from air traffic controllers. Helicopter pilots must be on the lookout for obstacles such as transmission towers or power lines. All airline pilots must monitor warning devices that detect dangerous and sudden shifts in wind.

When visibility is poor airline pilots must rely on their instruments including altimeter readings, special navigation radios and other sophisticated equipment that gives them information about their position and obstacles.

Airline pilots also have non-flying duties, but those tasks vary from job to job. Under the Flight Deck Officer program some airline pilots undergo training and screening to be deputized as Federal law enforcement officers to protect the cockpit with issued firearms. Others may have to handle passenger luggage, keep records, schedule flights or load the aircraft.

Some airline pilots are also flight instructors teaching on the ground, in simulators or using dual-controlled aircraft.
Many airline pilots spend much of their time away from home due to overnight layovers. The Airline Pilot’s Association calculates this number to be 360 hours a month. Away from home, airlines provide a meal allowance, hotel accommodations and transportation.

Jet leg is a common complaint of airline pilots, especially those on international routes. Flying can also cause mental stress as aircraft pilots are responsible for a safe flight in all conditions. They must be alert and quick to react when things go wrong.

The FAA regulates flying time by the hours per month and year. Most airline pilots fly about 75 hours a month and may work an additional 140 hours per month completing nonflying duties. Most have variable work schedules and must work irregular hours including night and weekend hours. Flight schedules are based on seniority. Source

Airline Pilot Training Programs from Aviator Academy
Professional Pilot Program

  • 259 Flight Hours
  • Ground School Class Pre& Post Flight Ground
  • Training in a College Campus Atmosphere
  • Single Engine Private Pilot
  • Private Multi-Engine
  • Single-Engine Instrument
  • Multi-Engine Instrument
  • Multi-Engine Commercial
  • Single Engine Commercial
  • Multi-Engine Flight Instructor
  • Instrument Flight Instructor
  • Single Engine Flight Instructor

160 hours of Multi-Engine Time

  • Aircraft for check rides
  • Cross Country flying coast-to-coast
  • No FTDs (Simulators) used towards flight time
  • *CRJ Jet Transition Program
  • Pilot Career Planning & Interviewing Class
  • 6 Months of housing

Cost: $52,785.00
6 Months of Housing is Included

Subtract -$6,100.00 if you hold a Private Pilot Certificate

Contact Aviator

Single Engine Commercial Pilot Training and Test Preparation

Single Engine Commercial Pilot Training and Test PreparationFlying the plane is the passion for many; that is why Private Pilot License is the most popular license. PPL holders enjoy he freedom to take-off and fly alone or with friends at any time, to any destination. If flying is not just your hobby and you wish to make a career as a pilot, CPL (Commercial Pilot License) is the next license on your list.

Having a Commercial Pilot License (CPL (A)) allows flying for compensation. What can you do with CPL? Below are some of the examples on how a pilot with CPL can get hired:

  1. By flying tourists for the sightseeing tours over the city;
  2. By flying parachutists for their adventures;
  3. By flight instructing and sharing your knowledge with others;
  4. By starting to gain some money uprightly after completion of your studies;
  5. By opening your own small business providing commercial air transportation services with single-pilot single-engine or multi-engine aircrafts (such as Cessna, Piper, etc);
CPL Privileges:
  • Exercise all the privileges of the holder of a PPL(A) / PPL(H);
  • Act as co-pilot (First Officer) in commercial air transportation
  • Act as pilot-in-command or co-pilot of any airplane (CPL(A) / helicopter (CPL(H)) engaged in operations other than commercial air transportation.
  • Act as pilot-in-command in commercial air transportation of any single-pilot airplane / helicopter
FAR 61.123 CPL Eligibility Requirements

To be eligible for a commercial pilot certificate, you must:

  • Be at least 18 years of age.
  • Be able to read, speak, write and understand the English language.
  • Hold at least a private pilot certificate.
  • Meet the aeronautical experience requirements of this section that apply to the aircraft category and class rating sought.
  • Pass the knowledge test.
  • Pass the practical test.
Ground Training for CPL

Ground training is part of all flight training for any license. As a student pilot, you will cover the following subjects in your preparation for CPL.

  • Air law and ATC procedures
  • Airframes & systems, electrics, power plant, emergency equipment
  • Instrumentation
  • Mass and balance
  • Performance
  • Flight planning & monitoring
  • Human performance & limitations
  • Meteorology
  • General navigation
  • Radio navigation
  • Operational procedures
  • Principles of flight
  • Communications
CPL Flight Training Goals

At the end of flight training, the trainee must have a minimum of 200 total flight hours (including PPL(A)/(H) time):

  • 100 hours as pilot-in-command
  • 20 hours of VFR cross-country flight time as pilot-in-command, including a cross-country flight totaling at least 540 km (300 NM) in the course of with full-stop landings at two aerodromes different from the aerodromes of departure
  • 10 hours of instrument training
  • 5 hours of night flying including one cross-country flight and 5 solo take-offs and 5 landings
  • 5 hours on a complex airplane
Examination – Theoretical

An applicant must demonstrate a level of knowledge appropriate to the privileges of the holder of a CPL(A)/(H) in accordance with the requirements in JAR–FCL 1 (Airplane) Subpart J.

Examination – Practical

The practical skill exam in the airplane with the examiner can be taken after successful completion of the written tests.
The applicant must demonstrate the ability to:

  • Operate the airplane within its limitations
  • Complete all maneuvers as smooth and as accurate as requested by JAA
  • Exercise good judgment and airmanship
  • Apply aeronautical knowledge
  • Maintain control of the airplane at all times.
Commercial Pilot Practical Test

Preflight Preparation: Certificates and documents, airworthiness requirements, weather information, cross country flight planning, national airspace system, performance and limitations (of airplane used for flight test), operations and systems, aeromedical factors.
Preflight Procedures: Preflight inspection, cockpit management, engine starting, taxiing, before takeoff check.
Airport Operations: Radio communications and ATC Light Signals, traffic patterns, airport runway and taxiway signs, markings and lighting.
Takeoffs, Landings and Go-arounds: Normal and crosswind takeoff and climb, normal and crosswind approach and landing, soft field takeoff and climb, soft field approach and landing, short field takeoff and maximum performance climb, short field approach and landing, power off 180º accuracy approach and landing, go-around/rejected landing.
Performance Maneuvers: Steep turns, steep spiral, chandelles, lazy eights.
Ground Reference Maneuver: Eights on pylons.
Navigation: Pilotage and dead reckoning, navigation systems and radar services, diversion, lost procedures.
Slow Flight and Stalls: Maneuvering during slow flight, power-off stalls, power-on stalls, spin awareness.
Emergency Operations: Emergency approach and landing (simulated), systems and equipment malfunctions, emergency equipment and survival gear.
High Altitude Operations: Supplemental oxygen, pressurization.
Post-flight Procedures: After landing, parking and securing.

Single Engine Rating:
  • If you are applying for a commercial pilot certificate with an airplane category and single engine class rating, you must log at least 250 hours of flight time as a pilot (of which 50 hours, or in accordance with FAA Part 142, a maximum of 100 hours may have been accomplished in an approved flight simulator or approved flight training device that represents a single engine airplane) that consists of at least:
  • 100 hours in powered aircraft, of which 50 hours must be in airplanes.
  • 100 hours of pilot in command flight time, which includes at least 50 hours in airplanes and 50 hours in cross-country flight in airplanes.
  • 20 hours of training on the areas of operation as listed for this rating, that includes at least 10 hours of instrument training, of which at least 5 hours must be in a single engine airplane, 10 hours of training in an airplane that has a retractable landing gear, flaps, and a controllable pitch propeller, or is turbine-powered, one cross- country flight of at least 2 hours in a single engine airplane in day VFR conditions, consisting of a total straight-line distance of more than 100 nautical miles from the original point of departure, one cross-country flight of at least 2 hours in a single engine airplane in night VFR conditions, consisting of a total straight-line distance of more than 100 nautical miles from the original point of departure.
  • 10 hours of solo flight in a single engine airplane, including one cross-country flight of not less than 300 nautical miles total distance and as specified, and 5 hours in night VFR conditions with 10 takeoffs and 10 landings (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control tower.
Pilot Training Program With Aviator Flight Training Academy 259 Flight Hours

Aviator Flight Training Academy offers professional pilot training programs with a minimum of 200 hours of multi-engine time. The flight school has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator), large classrooms and individual briefing rooms.

Commercial Specials
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Regional Pilot Job After Flight School

Regional Pilot Job After Flight SchoolBeing enrolled in a FAA approved and certified flight training school gives you good foundation to begin you pilot career. The flight instructor is the cornerstone of aviation safety. The FAA has adopted an operational training concept that places the full responsibility for student training on the authorized flight instructor. In this role, the instructor assumes the total responsibility for training the student pilot in all the knowledge areas and skills necessary to operate safely and competently as a certificated pilot in the National Airspace System.

Because of the perfect weather conditions through out the year, Florida attracts some of the top flight instructors. Training under the best instructors will help you catch on faster, give you credibility, and you will learn things you might not learn with other instructors.

After student pilot completes the necessary flight training, the next best step is to stay at the flight school and apply for a flight instructor. Working as a flight instructor provides you with experience needed to get a pilot job.

Applying For Flight Instructor Aviator Flight School

The programs at Aviator Flight School are designed to provide what the airline industry demands of future commercial pilots. The training you will receive at Aviator is one of the most intensive and challenging programs offered in aviation flight training today.

Upon completion of your flight training Aviator College encourages the graduating student to apply to stay on as a flight instructor. For a Full list of Regional Pilot Jobs please visit Aviator Link.

American Eagle – Pipeline Instructor (Flight)
CFI to First Officer

American Eagle Airlines has partnered with multiple flight schools to develop a career path from CFI to Regional Airline Pilot. This exciting new program gives the pilot a secured position at American Eagle Airlines while building time towards the ATP minimum flight experience requirements. Not only does the program provide this streamlined career path, but instructors are hired and employed by American Eagle while they are still instructing!

Once Pipeline Instructors reach the ATP minimums and 50 hours of multi-engine experience, they are placed into new hire pilot training at American Eagle in the next available new hire class.

Applying is easy, simply complete an application on http://www.AirlineApps.com, then send an email with your resume to Pipeline.Instructor@aa.com. Selected applicants will be flown to American Airlines/American Eagle headquarters in Fort Worth, Texas for the interview. Those selected from the recruitment process will then go to interview at one of the partner schools. Once approved by both American Eagle and the flight school, pilots will be hired by American Eagle and work as an instructor at the flight school until reaching ATP minimums.

Qualifications
To be considered applicants must hold:

  • Commercial Pilot Certification with multi-engine and instrument ratings
  • CFI and CFII Instructor Certifications
  • Current FAA First Class Medical
  • FCC License
  • Valid Passport

Applicants must possess the legal right to work in the United States and have the ability to travel in and out of the United States and to all cities/countries served by American Eagle. Ability to work weekends, nights, shifts, holidays and overnight trips. Must fulfill government-required criminal background checks to qualify for unescorted access privileges to airport security identification display areas and secure airport authority and/or U.S. Customs security badges, if applicable. Must be able to read, write, fluently speak and understand the English language.

Minimum Age

You must be at least 21 years of age.

American Eagle – Pilots

Fly with distinction.
If flying is your passion, you can fly with the best in the business as an American Eagle pilot.
American Eagle has forecasted pilot hiring activity to continue through 2013 and into 2014.
Pilot applicants that successfully clear the recruitment and selection process will be eligible to receive a $5,000 sign on bonus with the agreement to sign a two year Letter of Commitment to fly for American Eagle. Your wings are waiting. Apply today! SOURCE

Airline Pilot Training Programs

The programs at Aviator Flight School are designed to provide what the airline industry demands of future commercial pilots. The training you will receive at Aviator is one of the most intensive and challenging programs offered in aviation flight training today.

160 hours Multi-Engine

Professional Pilot Program

  • 259 Flight Hours
  • Ground School Class Pre& Post Flight Ground
  • Training in a College Campus Atmosphere
  • Single Engine Private Pilot
  • Private Multi-Engine
  • Single-Engine Instrument
  • Multi-Engine Instrument
  • Multi-Engine Commercial
  • Single Engine Commercial
  • Multi-Engine Flight Instructor
  • Instrument Flight Instructor
  • Single Engine Flight Instructor
  • 160 hours of Multi-Engine Time

Aircraft for check rides
Cross Country flying coast-to-coast
No FTDs (Simulators) used towards flight time
*CRJ Jet Transition Program
Pilot Career Planning & Interviewing Class
6 Months of housing
$52,785.00
6 Months of Housing is Included
Subtract -$6,100.00 if you hold a Private Pilot Certificate
$46,035.00
6 Months of Housing is Included
Additional fees* : books, written, checkrides, headset approx .$ 6,440.00
ENROLL NOW

What To Know About New Restricted ATP Qualifications Requirements Starting August 1, 2014

What To Know About New Restricted ATP Qualifications Requirements Starting August 1, 2014The Airline Transport Pilot license (ATP) is the highest achievement in aviation career. By the time you have reached this level you are now a professional pilot. The ATP is required in order to be the pilot in command for an airline, corporate flight department, or charter operator. Usually required for insurance reasons it signifies that you and you alone are ultimately responsible for the safety and well being of the passengers or cargo aboard your aircraft.

ATP Flight Training

The flight training for ATP is not much different in terms of maneuvers or procedures that you have already seen on your instrument, commercial and multi-engine check rides. The major difference is the standards you are expected to fly to. The tolerances are much tighter because at this point you are a professional pilot with a considerable amount of flight time and you are expected to be able to fly like a pro.

Training primarily focuses on polishing up your instrument flying skills it the multi-engine aircraft you will use for the check ride. If you do the training on your own it can be as little as 5-7 hours of prep. If you work for a large 135 outfit or 121 air-carrier its usually part of a FAA approved upgrade or transition training program.

ATP Testing

The test for the ATP is a demonstration of your multi-engine and instrument skills held to a higher standard.

The FAA Tests

Written
The written test for the ATP like all other licenses and ratings is an 80 question computerized test. The questions consist primarily of part 135 and 121 regulations, hazardous materials, high altitude and high-speed aerodynamics, and transport category operating and Performance Data.
Oral Exam
Again like the written the test the oral examination is taken to a highest level in your aviation career. With the examiner focusing on the regulations appropriate to your type operation, ie 121 or 135. Also included is an in-depth discussion of the test aircrafts various systems. This especially holds true if a company check airman is administering your check ride.
Practical Exam
The flight depending on your operation will be conducted in a multi-engine aircraft or flight simulator. The flight test is comprised mostly instrument procedures both multi and single engine. Other abnormal procedures may also be thrown in the mix with the simulator allowing fore more flexibility than a check ride in the aircraft. Like every other check ride aside from your instrument you will also have to demonstrate maneuvers such as stalls and steep turns.

FAA New 1,500 Hour Rule For ATP

As of Aug. 1, 2013, all U.S. airline first officers are required to meet much more rigorous minimum qualifications than have been in place for decades. The new requirements for airline copilots are intended to improve the safety of the U.S. airline industry and should also add value to pilots’ airman certificates.

The Final Rule

Directed by Congress, the Airline Safety and FAA Extension Act of 2010 called for increased minimum requirements for airline first officers.
The new rule mandates that airline first officers hold an air transport pilot (ATP) certificate or the new “restricted ATP.” An ATP certificate requires, among many other qualifications, that the pilot be at least 23 years old and have logged at least 1,500 hours of flight time.
The “restricted ATP” requires pilots to be at least 21 years old with
750 flight hours if they are military-trained and qualified,
1,000 flight hours if trained in a four-year college or university-accredited aviation training program leading to a bachelor’s degree, or
1,250 flight hours if trained in a two-year college aviation program leading to an associate’s degree.
Pilots who obtain their certificates and ratings via non-structured general aviation flight training can qualify for the restricted ATP at age 21 with 1,500 hours of flight time. Source

RESTRICTED ATP QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

FAA Notice N 8900.225

Restricted ATP Requirements between 07/13/13 and 07/31/14

The Restricted ATP certificate is for multi-engine aircraft and can only be used to serve as a first officer at an air carrier.
All pilots must:

  • Be at least 21 years old;
  • Hold a commercial pilot certificate with an instrument rating;
  • Pass the ATP knowledge test and practical test;
  • Meet the aeronautical experience requirements of Section 61.160.
  • Military pilots must:
  • Have a minimum of 750 hours of total flight time as a pilot.
  • Civilian pilots with 1000 hours of total flight time must:
  • Be a graduate from an institution of higher education who holds a bachelor’s degree with an aviation major and has completed at least 60 semester credit hours of aviation course work;
  • Have obtained the commercial pilot certificate and instrument rating from an associated part 141 pilot school.
  • Civilian pilots with 1250 hours of total flight time must:
  • Be a graduate from an institution of higher education who holds a bachelor’s degree or an associate’s degree with an aviation major and has completed at least 30 semester credit hours of aviation course work;
  • Have obtained the commercial pilot certificate and instrument rating from an associated part 141 pilot school.
  • Civilian pilots with 1500 hours of total flight and 200 hours of cross country flight time qualify.
Restricted ATP Requirements Starting 08/01/14

After 07/31/14, pilots pursuing a Restricted ATP certificate must also complete an ATP certification training program. The program will include 30 hours of ground training and 10 hours of simulator training. The program must be completed prior to being eligible to take the ATP written and practical tests. The 10 hours of simulator training will include 6 hours of training in a level C or D (full motion) simulator. According to the rule, this course will only be offered through Part 141, 142, 135 or 121 certificate holders, not allowing for Part 61 flight schools to develop courses and provide the training. Source

Aviator College Degree Program
Approved by the FAA for a Restricted ATP Certificate at 1250 hours

2 year Associates Degree Program
The Aeronautical Science Program prepares the graduate for a career in the aviation industry by providing a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, aeronautical sciences, aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry. The graduate will receive an Associate of Science Degree from Aviator College with flight ratings from private pilot through commercial, with Flight Instructor ratings. This training is necessary to obtain employment, and by completing the associate’s degree you will set yourself apart from other applicants since a degree is preferred in the airline industry.

The flight portion of the program consists of a minimum of 565 flight hours and more multi-engine time than any other college or flight school today. Our large multi-engine fleet is equipped with Garmin 430s, and ASPEN EFIS is being introduced. Single engine fleet consists of Piper Warrior III with all glass (EFIS systems). Ground school is taught in a classroom environment.

The school’s14 acre campus encompasses 37,000 sq. ft. Administration & Academic training facility is open from 7 am to 6 pm daily. The Flight Operations building is open 24/7 daily, rain or shine.

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Aviation Degree At Aviator College

February 2, 2014 Leave a comment

Aviation Degree At Aviator CollegeMany colleges throughout the world offer degrees such as bachelor of aviation science or associates of aviation science. Stand alone these degrees do not qualify for any profession without your commercial pilot license (CPL) but make a good starting point if you want to do a masters degree in aviation. Also they look very good on your resume and may be a door opener when applying for a job.

Many airlines, especially in the United States, prefer applicants with a college degree. So why not let your flight training build up college credit and earn a degree?

Already trained pilots can do an aviation degree program with a college. Depending on the college they may credit your flight time and certificates towards a degree. Usually you don’t get full credit (as if you had done the flying with the college), but it may still be a money saver as flying with some colleges are more expensive then the average flight school. However some colleges require you to do at least two or more certificates and/or ratings with them to qualify for a degree.

For trained pilots some of the classes you have to take are pure repetition as they are meant for pilot students enrolled in the degree program. You still have to take them to get the needed credits to graduate.

An aviation degree is a good, and cost efficient, alternative to doing any other college degree first and then start flying like many students do today. You save time by doing the flight training while you work on a degree. At the same time you save money as the flight training build credit.

A.S. Degree from Aviator College

Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology provides the most cost effective flight training programs and a two year Aviation degree in Aeronautical Science. The College has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator). College student’s receive a minimum of 565 flight training hours in the aviation degree program. Graduates will have the opportunity to stay on as a flight training instructor.

2 year Associates Degree Program

The Aeronautical Science Program prepares the graduate for a career in the aviation industry by providing a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, aeronautical sciences, aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry. The graduate will receive an Associate of Science Degree from Aviator College with flight ratings from private pilot through commercial, with Flight Instructor ratings. This training is necessary to obtain employment, and by completing the associate’s degree you will set yourself apart from other applicants since a degree is preferred in the airline industry.

The flight portion of the program consists of a minimum of 565 flight hours and more multi-engine time than any other college or flight school today. Our large multi-engine fleet is equipped with Garmin 430s, and ASPEN EFIS is being introduced. Single engine fleet consists of Piper Warrior III with all glass (EFIS systems). Ground school is taught in a classroom environment.

The school’s14 acre campus encompasses 37,000 sq. ft. Administration & Academic training facility is open from 7 am to 6 pm daily. The Flight Operations building is open 24/7 daily, rain or shine.

Aviator College specializes specifically only on the development and training of future commercial pilots world-wide.
Aviator College is approved through the Accrediting Commission for Career Schools & Colleges, the State of Florida’s Commission for Independent Education and the Federal Department of Education to award two-year Associate’s Degrees in Aeronautical Science with a concentration in Flight Instruction.

To earn the Associate’s Degree in Aeronautical Science the student must earn a minimum of 71 credit hours to include: 18 General Education credits, 25 credit hours of lower division ground schools and flight training, 22 credit hours of upper division training, and 6 elective credits.

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