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Does Your Flight School Offer The Best Flight Training Aircrafts

Does Your Flight School Offer The Best Flight Training AircraftsIf flying is your passion invest in time and research to find the best flight instructors and quality flight training programs approved by FAA. What flight training aircraft offered for flight training and how it is maintained is also crucial to your flight training experience.

The Flight Training Airplane

The training airplane is where you practice in the air what you’ve learned on the ground. High wing or low, it doesn’t make much difference. What’s important is how well the airplane is equipped and maintained. It’s also important that the school’s trainers are dedicated to pilot training and not to airplane rental.
How many training airplanes a school has depends on the number of active students. Generally speaking, one trainer serves four or five full-time students. This ratio may be higher with part-time students. Another consideration is the training fleet’s mix of primary, advanced, and multi-engine airplanes.

Because trainers are flown often and sometimes hard, how a flight school maintains its training fleet is important for both safety and scheduling. Asking questions about maintenance policies and procedures should be part of every flight school interview.

You’ll never forget the first airplane you fly. No matter how many other aircraft you may pilot, that first trainer will always have a special place in your heart and your logbook. However, picking the plane or helicopter you learn to fly in should to some degree be based upon your flying goals and your budget. Basic trainers are solid little airplanes with just enough room for you and you instructor. These “two-place” or two-passenger aircraft making learning to fly as easy as possible while keeping your flying cost low. Most are very forgiving to fly and are more tolerant of a beginner’s mistakes. However, they can also be a bit sparse when it comes to equipment and, in some cases, comfort. If you and your wallet are a bit bigger, then you may want to consider learning in a larger four-place (four-passenger) aircraft. Your costs will be higher, but you won’t have to transition or “move up” from your trainer when you want to take your spouse and two children for their first ride. These aircraft also tend to be capable of flying farther and faster, and have more advanced avionics that will help if you later decide to earn your instrument rating. source

The Cessna 172 Skyhawk is one of the most common airplanes used by flight schools. The four-seat airplane can be used for primary and advanced flight training, but it is also a practical rental aircraft for cross-country flights. The Skyhawk’s two doors make boarding very easy for student and instructor alike and provide ample ventilation while on the ground during warm weather. Handling qualities are docile and reasonably well balanced. Because the Skyhawk is the most popular airplane in the world, with more than 40,000 built in the last 50 years, you’ll be able to rent and fly from almost any airport worldwide.

Cessna 150/152

Some people say that since the end of World War II, more pilots have learned to fly in the Cessna 150 or 152 than any other type of airplane. These two Cessna models leave complexity behind in favor of low operating costs, reliability, and ease of use. It’s the docile handling of the two-seat airplanes that makes them so enjoyable to fly. Like everything else in the aircraft’s design, handling characteristics require very little effort. Source

Cessna Flight Training

Why Cessna

For more than eight decades Cessna has been innovating aircraft engineering to lead the world of aviation.
Continuing that tradition of pioneering in aviation technology, we are driven by ingenuity.
Our Expertise

Engineering and design

We have been reinventing the way you fly for more than 85 years. Our aeronautical engineers have imagined hundreds of original aircraft concepts into clean sheet designs advancing to the latest computer-enhanced technology and flight-simulation tools and, finally, to prototype. Because it takes years for a new aircraft to reach its maiden flight, we are always designing for tomorrow’s world.

Aircraft design

Each area of each aircraft design fulfills a function while its form remains noticeably simple.

Safety comes standard

Safety is the top priority for Cessna when designing and manufacturing aircraft. Everything from simple flying procedures to many standard emergency systems help to prevent errors and make handling simple and smooth. Our aircraft are designed both to react effectively to dangerous situations and to avoid them altogether. Combining both active and passive safety features ensures that every new aircraft is designed and equipped to deliver on the trust that passengers place in both pilot and machine every single flight.

Certifications

To prove our commitment to safety, we pursue a number of certification levels for each aircraft we build, including day, night, VFR, IFR, and flight into known icing conditions. Our aircraft are compliant with all RVSM-certification requirements. And, because specific approval is required for flying within civil and international airspace, Cessna offers owners a no-charge service to assist with this process.

Cessna Skyhawk

Introducing the world’s most popular aircraft. With more than 43,000 aircraft with several model variants delivered, the Skyhawk is the best-selling, most-flown plane ever built. It also enjoys a distinguished reputation as the safest general aviation aircraft available. The Skyhawk is a top performer, showcasing the agility, stability, and durable strength that Cessna is famous for.

Cessna engineering team designed the Skyhawk’s cockpit with the latest in avionic technology and the most advanced application of ergonomic sciences available. The flight deck is powered by the Garmin G1000® avionics suite, including optional integrated Garmin Synthetic Vision Technology (SVT™) and an automatic flight control system. Two 10.4-inch, high-resolution liquid crystal displays show flight instrumentation, traffic data, digital altitude, moving maps, navigation, communication, and other real-time flight-critical data.

See the future

The Skyhawk’s flight deck can include the optional Garmin Synthetic Vision Technology (SVT™), which offers sophisticated graphics modeling of terrain, traffic, and obstacles in the flight path. The system looks at the entire flight path via satellite and renders a three-dimensional “virtual reality” landscape, which is displayed on one or both primary flight displays. This technology prepares you for what lies ahead in plenty of time to plan for it and gives you a clear visual of any traffic around your aircraft, even in solid IFR (instrument flight rules) or nighttime VFR (visual flight rules) conditions.

Digital weather radar

With the optional GDL 69A data link receiver and a subscription to XM WX Satellite Weather, you will see a high-resolution representation of the weather along your flight path on your high-resolution primary flight display. The GDL 69 offers NEXRAD, METARs, TAFs, lightning, and more that you can layer directly over optional Jeppesen or standard topographic map databases. Global weather information is available through the optional GSR 56, which connects you to the Iridium satellite network. Voice and text messaging connectivity as well as position reporting and digital color radar data are included.

Skyhawk Performance
  • Maximum Cruise Speed 124 ktas (230 km/h)
  • Maximum Range 610 nm (1,130 km)
  • Takeoff
  • Takeoff Distance
  • Ground Roll
  • 1,630 ft (497 m)
  • 960 ft (293 m)
  • Landing
  • Landing Distance
  • Ground Roll
  • 1,335 ft (407 m)
  • 575 ft (175 m)
  • Maximum Operating Altitude 14,000 ft (4,267 m)
  • Maximum Climb Rate 730 fpm (223 mpm)
  • Maximum Limit Speed 163 kias (302 km/h)
  • Stall Speed 48 kcas (89 km/h)

Source

Aviator Flight Training Aircraft & Maintenance

Our fleet consists of 10 multi-engine and 26 single engine aircraft
The Aviator fleet is made up of multi-engine and single-engine aircraft. The primary aircraft used in our training programs are the Beechcraft BE-76 Duchess, Piper Warrior III PA-28, and the Cessna 172 Skyhawk, all are well known as training aircraft the world over. Our fleet also includes a Piper Arrow and a J-3 Cub. All aircraft are maintained in our maintenance facilities located here at the St. Lucie County International Airport. We average more than 35,000 hours of flight time per year. They are all equipped for VFR and IFR flight per FAR 91.205 (except the J-3 Cub which is VFR Day only).

Beechcraft BE-76 Duchess

The Beechcraft Duchess, also known at the BE-76, was designed as a general aviation, light twin training aircraft. A little sister to the Beechcraft Baron, the Duchess was chosen by Aviator as our multi-engine training aircraft because of the durability built into the product by Beechcraft. All of the Duchess aircraft at Aviator are equipped for instrument operations with an HSI and a VOR; many of the aircraft also have an ADF. Because the future is area navigation (RNAV), we have multiple aircraft equipped with Garmin 430 GPS systems. Having a broad range of learning options is the best way to help ensure future employment. The Duchess fleet is currently being upgraded to ASPEN glass cockpits. Several aircraft are equipped with weather radar and/or lightning strike detectors.

Cessna 172 Skyhawk

The Cessna 172 is the most widely used primary training aircraft in the world. Aviator uses the Cessna for private pilot and single engine training with Garmin EFIS Systems.

Piper Warrior III PA – 128

Aviator College welcomes it’s new fleet of Piper Warrior III airplanes equipped with Avadyne EFIS Systems.

Maintenance

Aviator has its own in-house maintenance facility, a 13,000 square foot environmentally approved hangar. Maintenance is under the supervision of the FAA. All technicians hold Airplane & Powerplant Certificates or better. Maintenance is open six days a week.

Student Pilot Code of Conduct

Student Pilot Code of ConductBecoming a pilot is a truly exhilarating and rewarding endeavor. As a newcomer to general aviation (GA) you will be exposed to many new and exciting precepts. This blog will list some of the values associated with being an exemplary GA pilot as illustrated in this Student Pilot’s Model Code of Conduct (Code of Conduct).

Student Pilot

Student pilot is the 1st license/certificate needed for pilot. You do not need a certificate to begin your flight training. You would only need it before you can fly solo.

Student Pilot Eligibility
  • You are at least 16 years old. If you plan to pilot a glider or balloon, you must be at least 14 years old.
  • You can read, speak, and understand English
  • You hold at least a current third-class medical certificate. If you plan to pilot a glider or balloon, you only have to certify that you have no medical defect that would make you unable to pilot a glider or balloon
Aviators Model Code of Conduct

The AMCC (Aviators Model Code of Conduct) is for use by aviation practitioners — pilots, mechanics, organizations, and the entire aviation community. Designed to be adaptable by the implementer, it is provided without charge and periodically updated.

The latest version of the code was released in April, 2012.

The Aviators Model Code of Conduct “offers recommendations to advance flight safety, airmanship, and professionalism.” Version 2.0, the latest update in a suite of products that includes model codes for aviation maintenance technicians, flight instructors, glider aviators, light sport aviators, seaplane pilots, and student pilots, includes a new emphasis on professionalism, enhanced focus on safety culture, and an emphasis on flight training and simulation devices, according to Michael Baum, a member of the board.

The Aviators Model Code of Conduct “promotes flight and ground safety, professionalism, and pilot contributions to the aviation community and society at large; encourages the development and adoption of good judgment, ethical behavior, and personal responsibility; and supports improved communications between pilots, regulators, and others in the aviation industry,” according to a news release. The all-volunteer effort offers models of behavior that it encourages members of the aviation community to adapt to their specific needs.

As you pursue the goal of learning to fly, careful attention to understanding safety and excellence greatly enhances the quality of your current and future training (and may even accelerate it). It also helps you to cultivate a philosophy or attitude toward flying that will serve you and society well throughout your flying career.

It presents a vision of excellence for student pilots (whether they are seeking a Sport Pilot, Recreational Pilot, or Private Pilot certificate) with principles that both complement and supplement what is merely legal. The Code of Conduct is not a “standard” and is not intended to be implemented as such. Some of the provisions of the Code of Conduct have been simplified to accommodate the novice; after gaining more knowledge and experience, student pilots should refer to the Aviators’ Model Code of Conduct in the flight safety section.

The Principles:

The Code of Conduct consists of the following seven sections (each containing principles and sample recommended practices).

  1. General Responsibilities of Student Pilots
  2. Passengers and People on the Surface
  3. Training and Proficiency
  4. Security
  5. Environmental Issues
  6. Use of Technology
  7. Advancement and Promotion of General Aviation
The Sample Recommended Practices:

To further the effective use of the Code of Conduct’s principles, Sample Recommended Practices offer examples of ways student pilots might integrate the principles into their own training. The Sample Recommended Practices (which include selected personal minimums) can help student pilots and their instructors develop practices uniquely suited to their own activities and situations. Unlike the Code of Conduct principles themselves, the Sample Recommended Practices may be modified to satisfy the unique capabilities and requirements of each student pilot, mission, aircraft, and training program. Some Sample Recommended Practices do in fact exceed the stringency of their associated Code of Conduct principles. They are not presented in any particular order.

Benefits of the Code of Conduct:

The Code of Conduct may benefit student pilots and the GA community by:

  • highlighting important practices that will help student pilots become better, safer aviators,
  • suggesting a mental framework for flight training,
  • addressing individual pilot’s roles within the larger GA community, by examining issues such as improved pilot training, better airmanship, desired pilot conduct, personal responsibility, and pilots’ contributions to the GA community and society at large,
  • encouraging the development and adoption of ethical guidelines, and
  • bridging the gap between student and certificated pilots, with the goal of advancing a common aviation culture.
Student Pilots’ Model

Code of Conduct – Principles
1 General Responsibilities of Student Pilots
Student pilots should:

  1. make safety their number one priority,
  2. seek excellence in airmanship,
  3. develop and exercise good judgment,
  4. recognize and manage risks effectively,
  5. adhere to prudent operating practices and personal operating parameters (for example, minimums), as developed with your flight instructor,
  6. aspire to professionalism,
  7. act with responsibility and courtesy, and
  8. adhere to applicable laws and regulations.

Explanation: Code of Conduct Section I serves as a preamble to and umbrella for the Code of Conduct’s other principles. It emphasizes safety, excellence, risk management, responsibility, and lays the foundation for accountability and heightened diligence.

Sample Recommended Practices:
  • Recognize, accept, and plan for the costs of implementing proper safety practices (often greater than expected).
  • Learn to identify prevailing conditions and adapt to changing in-flight conditions as directed by your certificated flight instructor.
  • Recognize the increased risks associated with flying in inclement weather, at night, over water, and over rugged, mountainous or forested terrain. Take steps to manage those risks effectively and prudently without exceeding personal
  • Approach flying with the utmost seriousness and diligence, recognizing that your life and the lives of others depend on you.
  • parameters (see Code of Conduct I.e.).
  • Develop, use, periodically review, and refine personal checklists and personal minimums for all phases of flight operations. Seek the input and approval of these materials by your certificated flight instructor.
  • If the weather doesn’t look good, it probably isn’t – don’t push it.
  • Learn the performance limitations of all aircraft you fly, and how to plan flights and determine fuel requirements.
  • Understand and use appropriate procedures in the event radio communications are lost.
  • Be familiar with The Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR). They represent the distilled wisdom of more than 80 years of flying experience.
  • Commit to making personal wellness a precondition of flying.
  • See and be seen. Learn and employ techniques for seeing other aircraft, such as scanning, and techniques to enhance your own visibility to avoid other aircraft, such as the use of radio, lights, and strobes.
  • For cross-country operations, identify alternate landing sites and available fuel along the planned route prior to departure in case deteriorating weather or other emergency circumstances make continued flight unsafe.
  • Exercise great caution when maneuvering at low altitudes.
  • Develop a firm understanding of effective decision-making.
  • Adhere to applicable flying club/school and Fixed Base Operator/flight centre rules and operating practices.
  • Learn the fundamentals well before proceeding to more advanced techniques and maneuvers. Source
Flying Lessons at Aviator Flight Training Academy

The Aviator Flight Training Academy offers a full line of flight training courses to meet the individual needs of each student.

Contact Aviator
Schedule a visit
Speak with a flight instructor, call 772-672-8222.

Student Tips For Choosing Your Flight School

Student Tips For Choosing Your Flight SchoolThere are a lot of factors to consider before you chose a flight school to begin your flight training. Once thing is for certain and no research is needed to confirm it-it is expensive! So as pilot, you need to invest your money wisely. Do not base your decision solely on advertisement flight schools post. Visit the school, talk to attending students, speak with flight instructors, inquire about their flight training program.

Type of Flight School

Flight schools come in two flavors, Part 61 and Part 141, which refer to the parts of the federal aviation regulations (FARs) under which they operate. The most common and least important distinction between them is the minimum flight time required for the private pilot certificate (sometimes called a pilot license)—40 hours under Part 61, and 35 hours under Part 141.

Considering that the national average for earning a private pilot certificate is 60-75 hours (how long you’ll take will depend on your ability and flying frequency), this difference isn’t important for initial pilot training. It does make a difference to commercial pilot applicants: Part 61 requires 250 hours, and Part 141 requires 190.
What differentiates the two is structure and accountability. Part 141 schools are periodically audited by the FAA and must have detailed, FAA-approved course outlines and meet student pilot performance rates. Part 61 schools don’t have the same paperwork and accountability requirements.

Learning under Part 61 rules can often give students the flexibility to rearrange flying lesson content and sequence to meet their needs, which can be of benefit to part-time students. Many Part 141 flight schools also train students under Part 61 rules.

Which type of flight school is best for you depends on your needs, available time, and other factors, such as veteran’s benefit eligibility (only Part 141 schools can qualify for VA-reimbursed training) and location. When it comes to the FAA checkride, which is the same for all, it doesn’t matter where you learned to fly, only how well—including your understanding of aviation academic material.

Accredited Flight School and Colleges

Although flight schools fall into two basic categories, Part 61 or Part 141, there is a third category that bears serious consideration by prospective pilots, particularly those planning a professional piloting career: nationally accredited pilot training institutions. Accredited flight schools must meet rigid standards of accountability for virtually every area of operation and must apply to an accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.
Aviation college degree programs also play a large part in today’s pilot training marketplace. If you are planning a professional flying career, an aviation degree may make you more competitive. A plus in seeking a degree is that in many cases you are eligible for financial aid and scholarships that will assist you, not only in your academic endeavors, but in flight training as well.

Flight School Check List

Pilots have a check list. A manual with instructions they follow all the time. So you should have a list too. Don’t base your decision on the literature you will collect from a flight school you are considering. You’re looking for informative substance, and this can be found as well in photocopied sheets as it can in full-color catalogs. While scrutinizing the material, take notes for use during the flight school visit, when you’ll check the veracity of its claims. Some things to look for:

  1. The school’s philosophy, goals, and objectives, and how they match your needs.
  2. Are there such benefits as housing, financial aid, and additional pilot training, such as aerobatics, that will broaden your experience?
  3. How important is flight training to the organization?
  4. How long has the flight school been in business?
  5. What about the school’s instructional staff, its enrollment numbers, and credentials?
  6. How many and what types of aircraft are used in the school’s flight instruction program?
  7. What are the school’s classrooms like?
  8. What services are available at its airport (instrument approaches and control towers)?
  9. What is the school’s reputation on flight regulations and safety policies?

Type of Flight Training Programs Offered

Have your questions ready when you are visiting flight schools of your choice. Before your meeting with flight instructors go around school and talk to pilot students enrolled in this flight school. Inquire about their experience.

Integrated vs. Modular pilot training

There are mainly two kind of pilot training, the integrated pilot training. It is kind of a full package to become an airline pilot as from little or no experience. Everything will be organized by the flight school. It is a full time pilot training (15 – 18 months) and it can be very intensive for some of the trainees. The main advantage is that you can focus on learning since everything is organized for you. The disadvantages are the price (more expensive) and working on top of that integrated pilot training is impossible. From my personal experience, the airlines prefer integrated trained pilots since I noticed that they found pilot jobs more easily than modular trained pilots.

Next is the modular pilot training, less expensive, longer (18 months +) and more demanding since you have to organize your modules one after each others. On top of that you will be in charge to book your aircraft, the instructors and also to apply for the exams. If you choose the modular training you really need to be organized! You will therefore lose some time to focus on your pilot training. The advantage of that modular pilot training is that you can be working at the same time. You are at the controls, you manage your time based on your professional and private activities.

Integrated Pilot Training:
  • More expensive
  • approx. 15-18 months
  • Full time training
  • Very intensive
  • Everything organized for you
  • Preferred by the airlines
  • Impossible to work at the same time
Modular Pilot Training:
  • Less expensive
  • 18 months +
  • based on your free time
  • You are in charge of the organization
  • Very demanding regarding organization
  • Possible to work at the same time

Note: Flight schools do not always provides modular and integrated pilot training. Some might only be providing modular pilot training. source

Flight School Question List for Interview

Sample of questions you might consider asking are:

How many flight instructors do you have and how many are full time vs. part time?

This is important because it will determine how available the instructors are. If most of the instructors are part-time, it means they have a full time job that will sometimes take precedence over your flight training. If your flight instructor is a part-timer, make sure your schedules mesh.

How many airplanes do you have available for flight training?

This is important because of availability. If there are only 1 or 2 airplanes available, you may not be able to schedule it when it’s most convenient for you. Having 3 or more airplanes available will increase the chances of you scheduling at your convenience.

How are your airplanes maintained?

There’s nothing more frustrating than showing up for a flight and then having to cancel due to a maintenance issue. Flight schools that have their own maintenance facility are good about keeping their airplanes in airworthy condition.

Which syllabus do you use for pilot training? Can I see a copy of it?

Schools that don’t follow a specific syllabus leave the training completely up to the instructor. In this case, find out which instructors are good about requiring their students to buy and follow a syllabus – because not all instructors do this.

Do you offer ground school classes? If not, how is ground school handled?

Most of the learning you will do will be on the ground. The flying is for practicing maneuvers and to develop your muscle memory. Since many instructors are interested in building up flight time, they will leave most of the ground school up to you. The ideal setup is a school that offers their own ground school. If you can’t find one, invest in a good home-study program available online or in pilot stores.

Do you have a chief flight instructor? Can I talk to him/her?

Having a chief flight instructor is a great sign because this means that the school takes flight training very seriously. Schools without a chief flight instructor usually have an ad hoc assortment of flight instructors, each doing their own thing. If you end up in a school without a chief flight instructor, the next step will be crucial.

Choose a Flight Instructor

Choosing a Flight Instructor is key when learning to fly. Try to look for an flight instructor that is not just trying to build up flight time or one who has been instructing for a few years. Make sure you are comfortable with him/her and make sure they follow a syllabus.

Finally, schedule a demostration flight, preferably with the flight instructor that you would be training with. This accomplishes a couple of things. First, it will give you an idea of what flying is like. Second, it will give you a chance to get the feel for your instructor and how comfortable you are with him/her.

Why choosing the right flight school and flight instructor is important

Most will agree that choosing the right flight school is a very important decision, but they won’t tell you why. This leaves people with a lack of understanding as to just how important this decision is. If you make the wrong decision, it could cost you thousands of dollars, waste time, and will possibly end up in you quitting and never achieving your dream of flying.

The reason people get frustrated and quit flying is that when they show up at a flight school, they have no idea what to expect or they have expectations that are completely off the mark with what actually happens.
If you want to fly as a hobby, you have to keep in mind that your certified flight instructor (CFI) is probably there to build up enough flight time to move into his/her next flying job, which is probably a regional airline job or small cargo company flying job.

This poor individual is getting paid a little over minimum wage and because they are interested in flying as a career, they take it very seriously and expect you to take it just as seriously. They will try to teach you to fly like an airline pilot, which is a little bit different than the type of flying you want to do. Flight instructors that have just graduated from a professional pilot program at a university are especially prone to want to teach you to fly like an airline pilot, when in fact, you have no interest in that type of flying.

Airline flying is very standardized since airline pilots need to do things the same way every time. A captain at an airline may fly with a co-pilot that he/she has never met before and will never meet again. Therefore, it’s crucial that all airline pilots are taught the same standardized procedures for operating the airplane.
You need to find a flight school with an instructor that will work with your way of learning and not treat you like an airline pilot wannabe. Try to determine your own learning style and your instructor’s teaching style as well as his/her motivation for flight instructing. Try to choose a CFI that likes to instruct because they enjoy teaching rather than someone who is there trying to build up flight time.

Source

Contact Aviator Flight School
Schedule a Visit

Which Flight Training Is Right For You, Modular or Integrated

Which Flight Training Is Right For You, Modular or IntegratedAny student wishing to become a pilot is learning one true fact very fast. Flight training to become a pilot is extremely expensive. In addition to money, time and commitment plays an integral part as well. Whether you want to fly for fun on the weekends or want to become a captain of a major airline company do a thorough research so your money is properly invested!

Pilot training is available on-site at most airports, either through an FAA-certificated (approved) pilot school* or through other training providers. An approved school may be able to provide a greater variety of training aids, dedicated facilities, and more flexibility in scheduling. A number of colleges and universities also provide pilot training as a part of their curricula.

Flight school you choose will be the foundation of your training. The type of flight school you choose and the experience of your flight instructor will be crucial in your pilot training. Choose wisely. Create two checklists to bring with you on your flight school research. One list should be a flight school checklist and the other should be a flight instructor checklist. Some sample checklist items are:

  1. How long has the school been in business?
  2. What is the school’s safety record?
  3. What is the availability of aircraft?
  4. How long has the instructor been teaching?
  5. How many students has the instructor taught for the license or rating you seek?
Integrated vs. Modular Flight Training

What are the facts concerning Modular and Integrated training? That is a popular topic among many pilots and has been for many years. There are some who prefer Integrated and others who prefer Modular, but for someone trying to choose a route it can get very confusing very quickly. When people are faced with a decision to choose between two of anything, the best way is to compare each and list both positive and negative. Make a pros and con list.

What Is Modular Flight Training

Modular training (which was known as ‘the self improver’ route) basically involves the trainee getting one license at a time. This route will take them from a PPL (Private Pilots License), through hour building and then onto ATPL theory (which could be done whilst hour building, for example, to save time). Upon successful completion of the 14 exams, you can then begin the CPL, IR and MEP. 150 PPL flying hours are required before starting the CPL. The CPL, IR (instrument rating) and MEP (Multi-engine Piston rating) can be completed in any order. Other modules can then be added on top of this to prepare the student for multi-crew Jet aircraft flying. The MCC (Multi Crew Co-operation course) and JOC (Jet Orientation Course) are both offered by numerous flight schools. The first aims to build up your experience in a multi-crew environment, and the latter provides you with Jet Simulator time, during which students will fly in IFR conditions in a multi-pilot role. Emphasis is placed on developing CRM (Crew Resource Management) skills, which is a vital part of the job. You will end up with an fATPL (frozen Airline Transport Pilots License), which allows you to apply for the airlines.

Modular students are not tied to any particular company, and have the freedom to complete the training at their own speed, perhaps whilst earning. This route is ideal for those who want to stay in work whilst they train and, as you probably know by now, it often works out to be much cheaper than the Integrated route.

What Is Integrated Flight Training

Integrated flight training is mainly a Modular flight training all balled up into one full-time course. Instead you will do single engine flight training (over 100 hours) followed by some Multi Engine time and then the CPL skills test. You will finish this section with an MEP rating and CPL license.

You will train, full-time, at one FTO (Flight Training Operator). Many FTO’s provide Integrated Courses, and most require the applicant to sit an assessment which is a pre-requisite to beginning training. These assessments will test Hand-Eye co-ordination, maths and physics skills, and will include interviews and/or group assessments as well as simulator tests.

If you pass an FTO’s assessment, you will be offered a place on their course. No previous flying time is required but a trial flight or two is, in my view, vital (to see if you actually enjoy it)! In reality, you’ll find that most will have flown previously.

When onto a course, the Integrated route generally starts with ATPL groundschool, where all 14 exams are studied for and sat over a 6 to 8 month period. Following this, trainees will then begin flight training, which is usually done abroad.

Following the CPL Skills test, Integrated students will then start the IR course where suddenly, the weather in Blightly is favorable for your training! This will be completed in multi-engine aircraft, and culminates in the IR rating being issued. From there, students go straight on to complete the MCC/JOC.

Many Integrated courses have added extras that can include CV workshops, extra modules (Often covering other areas of aviation, to give students a more broad knowledge of the industry) and foundation degrees. For example, OAA include ‘First Officer Fundamentals’ with their APPFO Integrated course, as well as a Foundation Degree. However, this is not to say that Modular providers don’t give you some extra goodies! ProPilot, a Coventry based ATPL groundschool provider, offer ‘Pilot Development Days’ which aim to provide students with a broader knowledge of the subjects they are studying (often provided by experts in the relevent field).

At the end of both Modular and Integrated training, students will have all of the licenses that make up what us EU bunch call the fATPL (frozen Airline Transport Pilots License). From here, you will be in a position to apply to the airlines, where the fATPL will become ‘unfrozen’ when 1500hours have been flown. Once un-frozen, you are technically able to advance to captaincy. Other avenues can be taken upon gaining an fATPL of course, such as Flight Instruction or Bush Flying.

Positives and Negatives For Integrated Flight Training

  • More focused, full-time training
  • All training is done at one FTO, meaning a complete training record is available to airlines
  • Lots of “added extras” included in the course (i.e. foundation degree, CV workshops, modules covering other areas of the industry).
  • Some FTO’s will pay you back if your training ceases
  • Graduate services and Cadet holding pools. Airlines will approach their partnered FTO’s and take on a number of Integrated cadets as and when required.
  • A lot of airlines take more Integrated than Modular pilots. Some airlines have exclusive agreements with FTO’s, meaning they will only take low-hour pilots from an Integrated source. This does not mean that modular pilots won’t get hired!
  • More expensive
  • You can’t ‘pay as you go’, license to license. However, you will pay in installments as you train which gives financial security.

Positives and Negatives For Modular Flight Training
  • A possible cheaper option
  • You can fit training around other commitments (work, family etc…)
  • Training can be completed to a more ‘Integrated’ timescale (Integrated Modular)
  • You aren’t tied to any particular company
  • Pay as you go’ payment is an option. This gives you more control over funds.
  • Training can be less focused
  • Takes longer (not necessarily a bad thing, it depends on your situation)The vast majority of modular FTO’s don’t have contracts/agreements with airlines, where they will take cadets from a holding pool. Source
Modular Flight Training With Aviator Flight Training Academy

The Aviator Flight Training Academy offers a full line of flight training courses to meet the individual needs of each student.

Multi, Instrument, & Commercial
  • 150 Hours of Multi-Engine
  • Cross Country flying coast-to-coast
  • Price includes flight instruction and all ground instruction
  • Course time is eight weeks or less
  • Writtens and Checkrides are extra
  • NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time
  • To enroll you must hold your PPL and 100 hours total time
  • Eight weeks of housing included (one person per bedroom)

$ 29,995.00
Financing Available for those who qualify

Multi_Engine Rating
  • 10 Hours Multi-Engine
  • Pre & Post Flight, Ground Instruction
  • NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time

$ 3,100.00

For a full list of flight training option, contact aviator or schedule a visit.
Talk to a flight training instructor 772-672-8222.

Why To Consider Sport Pilot License and Begin Your Flight Training

Why To Consider Sport Pilot License and Begin Your Flight Training

How to Become a Sport Pilot
  1. Meet Medical and Eligibility
  2. Pass a FAA Sport Pilot Knowledge Test
  3. Receive flight instruction in an appropriate aircraft.
  4. Pass a FAA Sport Pilot Practical Test
  5. Sport Pilot Certificate Issued

NOTE: (All Category and Class Privileges Endorsed in Logbook)

If you are a FAA Certificated Pilot and Want to Exercise Sport Pilot Privileges:

You need:

  1. Hold at Least a Recreational Pilot Certificate (X-C Training if a Rec Pilot 61.101(c))
  2. Hold Category and Class Ratings for the LSA Flying
  3. (Additional Category and Class Privileges Endorsed in Logbook)
  4. U.S Drivers License or FAA Medical
  5. Current Flight Review
  6. 3 Takeoffs and Landings within 90 days (if carrying a passenger)
  7. Operate only FAA Certificated LSA
  8. Comply with all Sport Pilot Privileges and Limits
  9. Exercise Sport Pilot Privileges
Medical Requirements For Sport Pilot
  • (14 CFR part 61.23/53/303)
  • A Medical or U.S. Driver’s License (Other than Balloon or Glider)
  • A Student Pilot Seeking Sport Pilot Privileges in a Light-Sport Aircraft
  • A Pilot Exercising the Privileges of a Sport Pilot Certificate
  • A Flight Instructor Acting as PIC of a Light-Sport Aircraft
DEFINITION OF A LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT

14 CFR PART 1.1
Light-sport aircraft means an aircraft, other than a helicopter or powered-lift that, since its original certification, has continued to meet the following:
(1) A maximum takeoff weight of not more than–
(i) 1,320 pounds (600 kilograms) for aircraft not intended for operation on water; or
(ii) 1,430 pounds (650 kilograms) for an aircraft intended for operation on water.
(2) A maximum airspeed in level flight with maximum continuous power (VH) of not more than 120 knots CAS under standard atmospheric conditions at sea level.
(3) A maximum never-exceed speed (VNE) of not more than 120 knots CAS for a glider.
(4) A maximum stalling speed or minimum steady flight speed without the use of lift-enhancing devices (VS1) of not more than 45 knot s CAS at the aircraft’s maximum certificated takeoff weight and most critical center of gravity.
(5) A maximum seating capacity of no more than two persons, including the pilot.
(6) A single, reciprocating engine, if powered.
(7) A fixed or ground-adjustable propeller if a powered aircraft other than a powered glider.
(8) A fixed or autofeathering propeller system if a powered glider.
(9) A fixed-pitch, semi-rigid, teetering, two-blade rotor system, if a gyroplane.
(10) A nonpressurized cabin, if equipped with a cabin.
(11) Fixed landing gear, except for an aircraft intended for operation on water or a glider.
(12) Fixed or retractable landing gear, or a hull, for an aircraft intended for operation on water.
(13) Fixed or retractable landing gear for a glider. Source FAA.gov

Sport Pilot License

The Sport Pilot License allows you to fly a two seat Light Sport Aircraft during the day with visual contact of the ground under 10,000 feet above sea level.

The FAA’s Sport Pilot License was developed, with safety as paramount, after many years of consultation and cooperation with flying organizations and aircraft manufacturers.

By eliminating the requirement for night flying, radio navigation and some instrument training, the Sport Pilot license and Light Sport Aircraft (LSA) have returned flying to its fun and basic elements. Thus, the Sport Pilot License and Light Sport Aircraft have reduced the time and cost of becoming a pilot by about 50%.

The Sport Pilot License also allows senior pilots to continue flying and transition into LSAs without the need of a medical exam, provided that the pilot has not failed an aviation medical exam previously.

Three Reasons To Consider A Sport Pilot Certificate

By Kyle Garrett

Sport pilot training is one of the most exciting areas of flight training in the US. It is relatively new, but it is a great place to start an adventure in aviation. In the past, flying anything heavier than 254 pounds (the weight limit for ultralights) required at least a recreational pilot certificate. The training difference for a recreational and private pilot certificates is so minuscule, that most pilots opted to hold out for the less restrictive private pilot certificate. That’s where sport pilot comes in.

Sport pilot training offers a quicker path to certification
Sport pilot training is much more flexible than the recreational certificate and doesn’t require as much training as a private pilot certificate. In fact, the required flight hours are half that of the private pilot certificate. There are some restrictions, like no night flying, but sport pilots also have a lot of flexibility. The sport pilot certificate is designed to be a low-cost way for pleasure fliers to get in the cockpit, but it is also a great way to start a pilot career.
Sport pilot training doesn’t require a medical exam. Something unique to the sport pilots is the ability to self-certify medical fitness with a drivers license. You don’t need a medical certificate to fly sport pilot. There is one big potential exception to this rule, you can’t have been denied a medical. That means, if you go to an aviation medical examiner who says you are unfit for flight, you can’t turn around and self-certify your medical fitness. From that point, the FAA says you’ve got to get a medical examiner to approve you for flight just like everyone else.

Sport pilot training puts you in the cockpit of great aircraft
One of the areas where the sport pilot certificate is obviously more restricted than a private pilot certificate is aircraft. Sport pilots are only allowed to fly light sport aircraft, or LSA, which are aircraft that meet a certain standard. Generally, the standard is an aircraft less than 1320 pounds gross weight, with only two seats, and a maximum speed of less than 120 knots. There are several other restrictions, but generally it isn’t a mystery whether a plane is an LSA or not.

There are two major categories of LSA: purpose-built LSA, like the Remos GX or Icon A5, and legacy LSA, like the Piper Cub or Aeronca Champ. These two categories of LSA are very different, but offer interesting perks. The purpose-built LSA tend to be sleek and modern looking and they sport cockpits stuffed with the latest technology. They don’t carry quite the cost of traditional aircraft, like the Cessna 182, but they aren’t cheap either. The appeal is that you can gain proficiency with glass panel avionics, GPS and autopilots more affordably than a private pilot. If expense is your primary concern, the legacy LSA will be helpful. With legacy LSA, which are certified aircraft that meet LSA regulations, there aren’t as many bells and whistles. Many of these aircraft are the old tube-and-fabric, stick-and-rudder standards of yesteryear. The benefit is, they are cheap and simple to operate.

No matter your goal, whether it is to become a professional pilot, Sunday flier, or something in between, sport pilot training is a great way to get started.

Flight Training Classes With Aviator Flight Training Academy

The Aviator Flight Training Academy offers a full line of flight training courses to meet the individual needs of each student.

Contact Aviator
Schedule a visit.

Tactical And Operational Errors in Pilot’s Decision Making Process

Tactical And Operational Errors in Pilot’s Decision Making ProcessPilot error refers to any action or decision – or lack of proper action – made by a pilot that plays a role in an accident. This may include a simple mistake, a lapse in judgment or failure to exercise due diligence. There are two types of pilot errors according to Aviation Safety Magazine:

  1. Tactical errors, which are related to a pilot’s poor actions or decisions, often caused by fatigue, inebriation or lack of experience
  2. Operational errors, related to problems with flight instruction and training.

In fact, pilot error is the leading cause of commercial airline accidents, with close to 80% percent of accidents caused by pilot error, according to Boeing. The other 20% are mainly due to faulty equipment and unsafe, weather-related flying conditions.

Although policies put in place to reduce pilot error are not universal across the world, there are varying guidelines about how long a pilot can captain a flight, how many co-pilots should be present and how many hours a pilot can fly before taking mandatory breaks. There are also varying guidelines about how many hours of training pilots must complete, below what altitude they should not hand over control of a plane and when they should abort landings.

“Pilot judgment is the process of recognizing and analyzing all available information about oneself, the aircraft and the flying environment, followed by the rational evaluation of alternatives to implement a timely decision which maximizes safety. Pilot judgment thus involves one’s attitudes toward risk-taking and one’s ability to evaluate risks and make decisions based upon one’s knowledge, skills and experience. A judgment decision always involves a problem or choice, an unknown element, usually a time constraint, and stress. ” (Transport Canada: Judgment Training Manual).

The causal factor in about 80% to 85% of civil aviation accidents; is the human element, in other words, pilot error, a poor decision or a series of poor decisions made by the pilot-in-command. This concept is known as the poor judgment chain. One poor decision increases the probability of another and as the poor judgment chain grows, the probability of a safe flight decreases. The judgment training program teaches techniques; for breaking the chain by teaching the pilot to, recognize the combination of events that result in an accident and to deal with the situation correctly in time to prevent the accident from occurring.

How a pilot handles his or her responsibilities as a Pilot depends on attitude. Attitudes are learned. They can be developed through training into a mental framework that encourages good pilot judgment.

The pilot decision making training program is based on recognition of five, hazardous attitudes.

  1. Anti-authority. This attitude is common in those who do not like anyone telling them what to do.
  2. Resignation. Some people do not see themselves as making a great deal of difference in what happens to them and will go along with anything that happens.
  3. Impulsivity. Some people need to do something, anything, immediately without stopping to think about what is the best action to take.
  4. Invulnerability. Some people feel that accidents happen to other people but never to themselves. Pilots who think like this are more likely to take unwise risks.
  5. Macho. Some people need to always prove that they are better than anyone else and take risks to prove themselves and impress others.

Pilots who learn to recognize these hazardous attitudes in themselves can also learn how to counteract them, can learn to control their first instinctive response and can learn to make a rational judgment based on good common sense.

The DECIDE acronym was developed to assist a pilot in the decision making process.

D – detect change.
E – estimate the significance of the change.
C – choose the outcome objective.
l – identify plausible action options.
D – do the best action.
E – evaluate the progress.

Using the DECIDE process requires the pilot to contemplate the outcome of the action taken. The successful outcome should be the action that will result in no damage to the aircraft or injury to the occupants.

When a pilot receives a license to fly, he is being given the privilege to use public airspace and air navigation facilities. He is expected to adhere to the rules and to operate an aircraft safely and carefully. He is expected to use good judgment and act responsibly. Decision- making is a continuous adjustive process that starts before take-off and does not stop until after the final landing is made safely. Positive attitudes toward flying, learned judgment skills, will improve a pilot’s chances of having a long and safe flying career. Source

The I’M SAFE Checklist

Evaluating our personal airworthiness can be a difficult and demanding task. One tool to help make that assessment is the I’M SAFE checklist. Each letter represents one of six important factors affecting our ability to fly safely and engage in effective decision making. If you find yourself deficient in any of these areas, your decision-making ability may be compromised, and the no-go decision should be made.

Illness-Any form of illness can affect our ability to safely operate an aircraft. Remember that the symptoms of colds and other minor illnesses can be exacerbated by changes in pressure that result from changes in altitude. Sinus blockage caused by a head cold, for example, can result in severe vertigo. If you wouldn’t be able to pass an FAA medical exam, or if you have any condition that might alter your ability to safely operate an aircraft, the only safe choice is not to fly.

Medication-On the heels of illness is medication. Pilots are often tempted to use over-the-counter remedies to mask the effects of illnesses such as colds, but these remedies may have side effects that severely affect our judgment and decision making. If you are considering flying while taking any medication, first consult your aviation medical examiner.

Stress-Numerous forms of stress can alter our decision-making ability. Remember that the psychological stresses of work, school, family, or personal life are carried with you into the cockpit and can degrade your performance. Physical stress such as hot or cold temperature, high humidity, noise, vibration, and turbulence can take their toll on your decision-making ability. Hard work and the resulting soreness and fatigue can conspire against us as well. Stresses are also cumulative, so before you decide to fly, consider all the stresses acting upon you and the potential cumulative effect.

Alcohol-All pilots should know better than to mix alcohol with flying. The federal aviation regulations prohibit flying within eight hours of drinking alcoholic beverages, when under the influence of alcohol (or other drugs), or any time blood alcohol levels exceed .04 percent. Remember, too, that many cold remedies include alcohol as an active ingredient, so be certain not to use these before flying.

Fatigue-It’s difficult to think clearly and rationally when you’re tired. Mental abilities as well as motor coordination can be severely compromised when a pilot is tired. If you haven’t had adequate rest, don’t fly.

Eating-Nutrition is another important factor that contributes to mental processes, including decision making. If you haven’t been eating properly or drinking enough fluids, don’t expect to be a safe pilot. Your body cannot perform its best if it doesn’t have the nutrients and fluids it needs. source

Pilot Training in Florida

The programs at Aviator Flight School are designed to provide what the airline industry demands of future commercial pilots. The training you will receive at Aviator is one of the most intensive and challenging programs offered in aviation flight training today.

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Speak with Flight Instructor, call 772-672-8222.

Different Types of Flight Schools and Flight Training Offered in US

Different Types of Flight Schools and Flight Training Offered in USWith a shortage of pilots evident in US, now is a good opportunity for students who ever thought of becoming a pilot.
U.S. airlines are facing what threatens to be their most serious pilot shortage since the 1960s, with higher experience requirements for new hires about to take hold just as the industry braces for a wave of retirements.

Federal mandates that took effect in 2013 require all newly hired pilots to have at least 1,500 hours of prior flight experience—six times the current minimum—raising the cost and time to train new fliers in an era when pay cuts and more-demanding schedules already have made the profession less attractive. Meanwhile, thousands of senior pilots at major airlines soon will start hitting the mandatory retirement age of 65.

Another federal safety rule that effect in early 2014, also will squeeze the supply, by giving pilots more daily rest time. This change is expected to force passenger airlines to increase their pilot ranks by at least 5%. Adding to the problem is a small but steady stream of U.S. pilots moving to overseas carriers, many of which already face an acute shortage of aviators and pay handsomely to land well-trained U.S. captains.

“This is going to come to a crisis,” said Bob Reding, recently retired executive vice president of operations at AMR Corp.’s American Airlines and now a consultant to FlightSafety International Inc., an aviation training provider.

With new strict requirements in flight training time, the decision to become a pilot should not be taken lightly. The career path to become a pilot requires commitment and financial resources to achieve your goal. Flight training is a very serious investment and should not be taken lightly. Do you research to find out which flight school to choose that will best suit your needs.

Choosing Flight School

With over 1,900 flight schools to pick from, you’ll have lots of options. But which one is right for you? It helps if you have an idea of what you want from aviation. Do you want to fly for fun, for business, or as a career?

What is common for most flight schools is that all of them have a chief flight instructor. This is the person in charge of all flight training and can be compared to the principle of an ordinary school. Depending on the size of the flight school this usually is a person with a lot of flight time and instruction time. Quite often they are retired airline pilots or ex-military pilots with a genuine interest in flying and flight training.

His or her job is to look after all the flight training with the school and you are likely to fly with him on stage checks or progression tests. Depending on the size of the school he may have own students.

Under the chief flight instructor you find from one to several assistant chief flight instructors. They are senior instructors with the flight school or have a lot of instruction time. Like the chief flight instructor they perform stage checks or progression tests. Often they are responsible for a certain area of the training, ex. private pilot courses or instrument rating courses. The assistant chief flight instructor(s) may have own students, and quite often teaching other instructor students due to their experience level.

Under the chief and his assistant(s) you find all the flight instructors. They do most of the training at the flight school. Depending on the instructor certificates held he or she will do most of the flight training with you. Many instructors are fresh out of flight school and work as instructors to build flight time. Unfortunately some are not very interested in instructing, so always pay attention to your instructor’s behavior in the beginning and go to your assistant chief flight instructor or chief flight instructor if you experience no progression. Sometimes the problem is the instructor, not you.

Dual Certificate school
These are flight schools offering certificates to more then just their national certificates. Good examples are schools in the United States offering training to both FAA (USA) and JAA (Europe) certificates. These are usually large flight schools and they may be offering it through partnering schools in other countries. Some even have courses leading to both FAA and JAA certificates. This is commonly done by making you an FAA pilot first and build up flight time in the United States (as a flight instructor, small cargo or banner pilot), before you go back to Europe for conversion to JAA. Even though this way usually is a little more expensive it is a good way to build flight time and get dual certificates.
Types of Flight Schools—Part 61 and Part 141 Schools, Flight Time, and Earning a Pilot Certificate
Flight schools come in two flavors, Part 61 and Part 141, which refer to the parts of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) under which they operate. The most common and least important distinction between them is the minimum flight time required for the private pilot certificate (sometimes called a pilot license)—40 hours under Part 61, and 35 hours under Part 141.

Considering that the national average for earning a private pilot certificate is 60-75 hours (how long you’ll take will depend on your ability and flying frequency), this difference isn’t important for initial pilot training. It does make a difference to commercial pilot applicants: Part 61 requires 250 hours, and Part 141 requires 190.

What differentiates the two is structure and accountability. Part 141 flight schools are periodically audited by the FAA and must have detailed, FAA-approved course outlines and meet student pilot performance rates. Part 61 schools don’t have the same paperwork and accountability requirements.

Learning under Part 61 rules can often give students the flexibility to rearrange flying lesson content and sequence to meet their needs, which can be of benefit to part-time students. Many Part 141 schools also train students under Part 61 rules. Source

Ground School, Distant Learning and Online School

In addition to all the flight schools you also have schools only offering the theory part. As there is a lot of reading involved to become a pilot some only offer this part. The benefit is you can get rid of all the written pretty fast and then concentrate on the flying. With distant learning and online schools you can also be anywhere in the world and still do their programs.

Especially pilots brushing up on lost knowledge (there is a lot to keep track of), flight instructors renewing their certificate or pilots converting from one nationality to another use ground, distant learning or online schools.

Also as many part 61 schools do not offer ground school classes and paying an instructor by the hour to teach you may be expensive, doing a class this way may be smart when starting your training.

Make A Summary Flight School Checklist

What flight school you ultimately choose depends on the quality flight training you desire in a method convenient to your schedule. In earning your private pilot certificate, you will have achieved a license to learn. Aviation is an ever-changing activity, and good pilots are always learning.

  • Determine your aviation goals. Are you learning to fly for fun or do you plan to pursue a career?
  • Compile a list of schools to examine, and request literature from each. Review material from each school and answer the questions outlined earlier here.
  • Once you’ve done your homework, visit the final two or three schools that pass the test. Ask questions and get a feel for the personalities of the schools. Ask specific questions and insist on specific answers. Talk to other students and flight instructors.
  • Once you’ve decided on a school, be sure a written agreement outlines the payment procedures.
  • Use online flight school directory to find a flight school near you.
Aviator Flight School in Florida

Location is very important when you are looking for a flight training school. Florida is a great place to earn your wings. The moderate and mild climate makes flight training a pleasure. The good weather allows you to log more flying hours faster, get your degree quicker and be on the way sooner to your new aviation career. Ft. Pierce is a small city with friendly people – without congested traffic on the ground or in the air.

Founded in 1982 Aviator Flight School offered opportunities to students looking to receive training to fulfill the specialized demands of the airline industry. The Aviator Flight School moved from Addison, Texas to its current location at the Fort Pierce, Florida, campus in 1999.The school has continued to grow and evolve. In 2009 Aviator became a college and expanded into the current 77,500 sq. ft. campus.

Since 1982, when the first students signed up for flight training, students at the Aviator Flight School have earned more than 20,000 FAA Licenses. From the beginning, Aviator has been committed to excellence in education. The majority of our graduate pilots are flying professionally in the U.S. and around the world.
Today we operate a fleet of more than 30 aircraft that fly over 30,000 hours yearly. As the Flight School advances and the alumni increase, the college remains focused on developing leaders and professionals in the aviation industry.

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