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Archive for June, 2012

Pilot Certification and Pilot Training Programs

Pilot Certification and Pilot Training ProgramsA typical pilot looking to get hired by the airlines will usually get the following certificates and rating in the order listed below.

  • Student Pilot Certificate
  • Private Pilot Certificate
  • Instrument Pilot Rating
  • Commercial Pilot Certificate
  • Multi Engine Pilot Rating with Commercial and Instrument Add-on
  • Flight Instructor certificate
  • Instrument Instructor Rating
  • Multi Engine Instructor Rating
  • Airline Transport Pilot Certificate
Student Pilot Certification

An individual who is learning to fly under the tutelage of a flight instructor and who is permitted to fly alone under specific, limited circumstances. If you have just started your flight training then this is the category that you fall under.

Sport Pilot Certification

An individual who is authorized to fly only Light-sport Aircraft. This new pilot certificate is more affordable then becoming a private pilot because you need fewer hours to qualify for a sport pilot certificate. The sport pilot certificate offers limited privileges mainly for recreational use.

Recreational Pilot Certification

An individual who may fly aircraft of up to 180 horsepower and 4 seats in the daytime for pleasure only. Most new student pilots prefer to work towards the new Sport Pilot Certificate instead of the Recreational Pilot Certificate.

Private Pilot Certification

An individual who may fly for pleasure or personal business, generally without accepting compensation. This is the certificate that the majority of active pilot pursue. If you plan on working for the airlines or flying for hire, this is the first pilot certificate that you will work towards.

Commercial Pilot Certification

An individual who may, with some restrictions, fly for compensation or hire. Once you complete your private pilot certificate you will either work towards your commercial pilot certificate or the instrument rating. The commercial pilot certificate allows you to get paid for flying under certain circumstances. This doesn’t mean that you can jump in your airplane and have someone pay you to fly them somewhere.

ATP (Airline Transport Pilot Certification)

An individual authorized to act as pilot in command for a scheduled airline. The airline transport pilot certificate allows you to operate as a Captain for an airline or private charter. Most airlines will not hire you until you acquire the atp certificate.

Instrument Pilot Rating

An instrument rating is required to fly under instrument flight rules. Instrument ratings are issued for a specific category of aircraft; a pilot certified to fly an airplane under IFR has an Instrument Airplane rating. Once you complete your private pilot’s certificate you will more than likely work towards your instrument rating.

Multi Engine Pilot Rating

A multi-engine rating is required to fly an airplane with more than one engine. It is the most common example of a class rating. If you want to become an airline pilot then you will have to get your multi engine rating. You will also need to build at least one hundred hours of multi engine time before any commercial operator hires you.

Flight Instructor Certification

A flight instructor certificate authorizes the holder to give training and endorsement for a certificate, and perform a flight review. Most pilots that want to become airline pilots pursue their flight instructor certificate.

Instrument Instructor Rating

A instrument instructor rating authorizes a certified flight instructor to give training and endorsement for an instrument rating.

Multi Engine Instructor Rating

A multi-engine instructor rating authorizes a certified flight instructor to give training and endorsement for a multi-engine rating. This is also a great way to build your multi engine time.

Ground Instructor Certification

The ground instructor certificate allows the holder to offer various kinds of ground instruction required of those seeking pilot certificates and ratings.

Pilot Training Program With Aviator Flight Training Academy 259 Flight Hours

Once you decide which pilot certification you want, it is time for flight training. Aviator Flight Training Academy offers professional pilot training programs with a minimum of 200 hours of multi-engine time. The flight school has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator), large classrooms and individual briefing rooms.

The Aviator Flight Training Academy offers a full line of flight training courses to meet the individual needs of each student.

Contact Aviator College

Online
PHONE: 1-800-635-9032 (Toll free number)
Schedule a visit
Associate Degree in Aviation Online Enrollment

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Flight Training for FAA Multi Engine Rating

Flight Training for FAA Multi Engine RatingWhen your flying career reaches a certain point, you’ll either want or need a multi engine rating.

Is Multi Engine Training Right For You?

If you plan to make a living as a pilot, odds are you’ll want to earn your multi rating. The vast majority of pilot jobs require the rating, and even if end up flying singles for a while, the multi engine rating will help your resume rise to the top of the stack. And if you’re flying only for business and pleasure, but you’re ready to move up to a twin, the multi rating is your next step.

Multi Engine Training Requirements

Most flight schools offer twin engine training because so many pilots need to earn the multi engine rating as a stepping stone in their careers. Here’s the list of FAA requirements for getting your multi engine rating (JAA requirements may differ):

  • You must hold a current FAA Private Pilot or Commercial Pilot Certificate
  • You must receive the appropriate training for multi engine aircraft from a certificated flight instructor, and your training must be logged
  • You must receive a written multi engine endorsement from a certificated flight instructor
  • You must pass an oral examination by an FAA Certificated Examiner
  • You must pass a Practical test (flight test) with an FAA Certificated Examiner

Once you fulfill all of these requirements, your FAA Pilot Certificate will be updated to reflect “Multi Engine Land (or Sea) privileges.

Learning Multi Engine

Depending on who you ask, multi engine aircraft are either safer or more dangerous than single engine aircraft. But one thing most pilots will agree on is that flying a “twin” is more safe IF the pilot is proficient in its operation. With this in mind, here are a few key points about flying multi engine aircraft:

  • Multi engine aircraft are usually more complex than twins and require a greater understanding of onboard systems and emergency procedures.
  • Multi engine aircraft, for the most part, are faster than singles and require the pilot “stay ahead of the airplane” to an even greater extent.
  • In order to stay safe in a multi, the pilot must remain proficient and train for emergency procedures often.
  • Pre-flight planning must be computed two ways in twins… first, with both engines operational, and second, with one engine failed at the worst possible moment (called the equal time point).
  • When an engine fails in a twin, pilots need to quickly reconfigure the aircraft for single engine flight by establishing the proper airspeed and bank angle, and minimizing drag with a combination of flaps, gear, cowl flap, propeller, and trim settings.
  • In most multi engine aircraft one of the engines is called the “critical engine” because if it fails, it creates a more adverse flight condition than if the other engine fails.
  • Vmc (minimum control speed with the critical engine inoperative) is the speed at which a twin engine aircraft becomes uncontrollable in the event of a failure of the critical engine in flight. Multi engine pilots learn how to manage airspeed in relationship to Vmc.
  • Takeoffs in multi engine aircraft require extra vigilance in the event of an engine failure. You’ll learn how to plan for an engine failure and what to do in case of an actual failure.
Multi Engine Time Building Programs at Aviator College

100Hrs Program

Our “Twin-Time” program offers 100 hours of Multi-Engine flight time anywhere within the Continental United States and the Caribbean. Aviators twin time program operates 24 hours-a-day,(24×7) rain or shine.

Lacking actual IMC flight time? Aviator encourages flights into IMC. We operate a fleet of 14 Beechcraft Duchess, the majority of which are fully equipped with weather radar, Garmin 430, HSI, DME, and Intercoms. Fleet of aircraft are now being converted to EFIS systems “Glass Cockpit”

Need Multi-Engine Time? Contact Aviator College for details, programs and specials. Or call us Toll Free 1-800-635-9032

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Colleges with Aviation Programs in the U.S.

Colleges with Aviation Programs in the U.S.Colleges, universities and other schools offer aviation programs to train pilots and flight crew, air traffic controllers, aircraft and power plant technicians, aeronautics and aerospace engineers, and airport managers.

Aviation majors study the business of flying planes. Many students learn how to fly planes and helicopters to become pilots, copilots and flight engineers. These students also learn how to use complicated airplane instruments, plan flight routes, check aircraft controls, make in-flight repairs and make takeoff and landing calculations based on current conditions. Other aviation majors stay on the ground and study areas such as aviation management, air traffic control, aviation safety and airport management.

Aviation majors looking to learn how to fly typically seek an associate career training degree from a technical school, career college, 4-year college or university. Many other aviation majors earn certificates. And those looking for business careers often pursue bachelors degrees from technical schools, colleges and universities.

Especially for those who want to fly planes, aviation majors should be confident, decisive and organized. You’ll also need good eyesight, even if that means wearing glasses or contacts. Nearly all careers in aviation require individuals who pay attention to details and stay calm under pressure.

How To Choose the College with the Best Aviation Program for You

You’ll find about 200 Aviation programs throughout the country. Whether you want to attend a technical school, career college, community college, 4-year college or university, you should dig deeper into each prospective program before you apply. Every paid pilot transporting cargo or passengers must be licensed by the FAA, so make sure prospective programs include 250 flight hours and the instruction to help you pass. Being close to a big transportation hub can come in handy when it comes time for flight training.

First, choose regionally accredited colleges with aviation programs that include training for the career you want. If air traffic control or flying are among your serious interests, be sure to choose a program that meets Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) guidelines. The FAA may even have certified it as a ‘Collegiate Training Initiative’ program.

See if the school is associated with an airport or large aviation business, since such schools tend to provide more internship opportunities. State-of-the-art flight or air traffic control simulators are good to have, as well.

A school with a flight team offers unparalleled opportunity for pilots, ground crew and mechanics. Some schools participate in skill competitions. Look for these and other factors that, matched with your interests, make one aviation program stand out above the others.

For students interested in flying, an associates degree is the way to go because it’s the minimum most airlines look for when hiring. While you’ll need to complete at least 250 hours in-flight, the Aviation major also includes classroom instruction in FAA regulations, aviation meteorology, aircraft operations and more. Associates degrees are also available for students who prefer to stay on the ground with careers in air traffic control and airport management.

2-Year Associates Degrees in Aviation

Jump Start Your Career With Flight Training and an A.S. Degree from Aviator College 565 Flight Hours. Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology provides the most cost effective flight training programs and a two year Aviation degree in Aeronautical Science. The College has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator). College student’s receive a minimum of 565 flight training hours in the aviation degree program. Graduates will have the opportunity to stay on as a flight training instructor.

Contact our Recruiting Department today to get detailed information on Aviation Degree in Aeronautical Science.

ENROLL NOW FOR FALL CLASSES

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Receive an Aviation Degree To Start Your Aviation Career

Receive an Aviation Degree To Start Your Aviation CareerDue to the complexity of the aviation industry, there are several different options for those interested in aviation careers. Career opportunities include aviation managers, pilots, and avionics equipment mechanics. With the proper training and education, starting a career in the aviation industry may not be as difficult as one may imagine.

Aviation managers are responsible for keeping airports safe and running efficiently. This may include hiring employees, taking appropriate measures to meet government security regulations, scheduling flight services and coordinating the transportation of passenger luggage. To be successful in aviation management, one should typically have good organizational skills, possess budgeting and finance skills and be comfortable in a leadership role.

To prepare for aviation careers in management, a four-year degree in business or transportation management is generally the first step. During undergraduate school, many students acquire internships with major airlines in order to gain an understanding of the complex activities that occur in the aviation industry. Many go on to obtain master’s degrees in business and take certification courses with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

Aircraft pilots not only fly commercial airplanes, but may fly helicopters, private plans or military air craft. Pilots are not only responsible for flying aircrafts, but may also be responsible for supervising other crew members, communicating with air craft controllers, overseeing flight plans as well as managing and testing aircraft equipment. Many pilots advance to become flight instructors, teaching flight courses periodically throughout their aviation careers.

Training to become a pilot typically requires some type of flight school followed by the appropriate licensing. Most pilots have a four-year degree in addition to specialized training. A fair number of pilots begin their flight training in the military while others obtain certification from the FAA.

Aviation equipment mechanics ensure that air craft and equipment is maintained, repaired and up to FAA inspection codes. Due to the complexity of the machines and their accompanying parts, equipment mechanics may spend a lot of time troubleshooting electronic systems and computerized controls. Some aviation mechanics specialize only on one particular type of air craft while others may be qualified to work on numerous types of equipment.

Associate Degree From Aviation College

Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology provides the most cost effective flight training programs and a two year Aviation degree in Aeronautical Science. The College has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator). College student’s receive a minimum of 565 flight training hours in the aviation degree program. Graduates will have the opportunity to stay on as a flight training instructor.

The Aeronautical Science Program prepares the graduate for a career in the aviation industry by providing a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, aeronautical sciences, aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry. The graduate will receive an Associate of Science Degree, ratings through Flight Instructor Multi-Engine, including the ratings necessary to obtain intermediate level employment. The flight training sequence for this program consists of of four flight-training modules plus additional flight training as specified in each option.

Contact our Recruiting Department today to get detailed information on Aviation Degree in Aeronautical Science.

ENROLL NOW FOR FALL CLASSES

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Types of Aviation Degree Programs

Types of Aviation Degree ProgramsThere are several types of aviation degree programs, most of which involve learning how to pilot a plane as well as obtaining knowledge beyond what is required for a basic pilot’s license. While most pilot positions do not actually require a college degree, airlines prefer to see that applicants have the focus to complete college-level work. A degree in aviation can be obtained at the graduate level, which is a good qualification for researchers and teachers in aviation. An aviation maintenance degree is quite different from a degree that includes flight time, but this can be a good program for people interested in the technical aspects of flight.

Bachelor’s degree programs in aviation can take the form of a bachelor of science or a bachelor of applied science. Some schools offer an associate’s degree, but a bachelor’s degree is preferred. In these types of aviation degree programs, learning how to fly planes is often a major part of the curriculum. Other courses may be taken, but gaining experience and flight time is usually one of the most important parts of the degree. Depending on the program, student loans and financial aid may be available.

Graduate-level aviation degree programs are designed for seasoned aviators and cover the theories and principles of aviation. This typically does not involve the engineering or safety aspects of flying, but rather the economic, social, and regulatory aspects of aviation. In aviation degree programs that prepare students to teach others about this topic, teaching experience may be available.

Aviation degree programs can also be highly specific, such as degrees in human systems, electrical engineering, or air traffic management. Devoted aviation schools often offer the widest variety of degree programs within this subject. Every aspect of work involving airplanes requires dedicated and well-trained employees, so it is possible to find degrees that address many different facets of aviation.

One of the problems with aviation degree programs is that many aviation jobs do not require this type of qualification. For example, airplane maintenance staff are not required to have airline maintenance degrees. Having advanced qualifications can be a way to get ahead in the workplace, so some of these programs are designed for professionals who will continue to work while pursuing an education.

Some degree programs that can be applied to airplanes are not offered under the category of aviation. For example, many electrical and mechanical engineering programs are applicable to aviation. Likewise, business programs can be steered toward the airline business. Taking one of these more general degree programs at an aviation school can be a good way to expand career opportunities.

Aviation College Degree Programs at Aviator College

Our Aeronautical Science Program includes 565 flight hours and more multi-engine time than any other college or flight school. NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time requirements. Our large multi-engine fleet is equipped with Garmin 430s, and ASPEN EFIS is being introduced.

The Aeronautical Science Program prepares the graduate for a career in the aviation industry by providing a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, aeronautical sciences, aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry. The graduate will receive an Associate of Science Degree, ratings through Flight Instructor Multi-Engine, including the ratings necessary to obtain intermediate level employment. The flight training sequence for this program consists of of four flight-training modules plus additional flight training as specified in each option.

Contact Information Links at Aviator College

Receive Catalog
Enroll Now For Fall Classes
Recruiting Office

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Flight Training Experience and Pilot Job Outlook

Flight Training Experience and Pilot Job Outlook

Flight Training Experience

After receiving your pilot licenses and ratings, you will need to build flight experience. One constructive way is to obtain a Certified Flight Instructor certificate. This will allow you to use your new skills to train other pilots, which should enhance your own skills and knowledge while building your flight experience and earning some money. Other options for building single-engine flight time include flying for local radio traffic stations, small cargo operators, crop dusting operators, pipeline inspecting operators, etc.

Once you have acquired a few hundred hours of flight time, you can start applying for multi-engine flying jobs. These are more challenging to obtain because the insurance requirements on the operators are more stringent. That’s where having a good number of single-engine flight hours will be helpful.

ALPA (Air Line Pilots Association) highly recommends that you network with other pilots who are one or two steps ahead of you. The single greatest way to achieve employment in aviation is through the recommendation of a pilot currently employed where you want to work. Because airlines entrust their pilot work force with expensive aircraft and the lives of their passengers, character recommendations are almost as important as flight experience.
After deciding which airlines you want to apply with and obtaining these companies’ minimum requirements for employment, ALPA strongly encourages you to file a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request for your “complete airmen files” with the Federal Aviation Administration. These records track your general aviation check ride performances and will help you accurately fill out your applications.

ALPA also highly recommends that you apply at your preferred employer sooner rather than later. Don’t wait until you are “extra-qualified.” Most airlines operate under seniority-based systems, meaning the earlier you get hired, the more protection you have against furlough and the quicker you will reach higher-paying statuses and more reliable schedules. You can always update your application as you achieve more ratings or experience after applying with an airline, but getting your initial application on file early is essential.

Pilot Employment and Job Outlook

Employment of airline and commercial pilots is projected to grow 11 percent from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Modest employment growth is expected as air travel gradually increases over the decade and as more travel takes place between Asia and the United States.
Most job opportunities will arise from the need to replace pilots who leave the workforce. Between 2010 and 2020, many pilots are expected to retire as they reach the required retirement age of 65. As older pilots retire and younger pilots advance, entry-level positions may open up. And the demand for flight instructors may increase as they are needed to train a greater number of student pilots.

Job prospects should be best with regional airlines, on low-cost carriers, or in general aviation, because these segments are anticipated to grow faster than the major airlines. In addition, entry-level requirements are lower for regional and commercial jobs. However, pilots with less than 500 flight hours will probably need to accumulate hours as flight instructors or commercial pilots before qualifying for regional airline jobs.

Pilots seeking jobs at the major airlines will face strong competition because those firms tend to attract many more applicants than the number of job openings. Applicants also will have to compete with furloughed pilots for available jobs.

Pilots with the greatest number of flight and instrument hours usually have the best prospects. For this reason, military and experienced pilots will have an advantage over entry-level applicants.

Individual Flight Training Courses

The Aviator Flight Training Academy offers a full line of flight training courses to meet your individual needs.

Multi, Instrument, & Commercial
  • 150 Hours of Multi-Engine
  • Cross Country flying coast-to-coast
  • Price includes flight instruction and all ground instruction
  • Course time is eight weeks or less
  • Writtens and Checkrides are extra
  • NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time
  • To enroll you must hold your PPL and 100 hours total time
  • Eight weeks of housing included (one person per bedroom)

Cost $ 31,775.00

Contact Aviator College via phone, online or schedule a tour.

Phone Numbers
(772) 466-4822
1-800-635-9032 (Toll free number)
(772) 489-8383 FAX

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Become an Airline or Commercial Pilot

Become an Airline or Commercial PilotMany pilots learn to fly in the military, but a growing number now earn an associate’s or bachelor’s degree from a civilian flying school. All pilots who are paid to transport passengers or cargo must have a commercial pilot’s license and an instrument rating. To qualify for a commercial pilot’s license, applicants must be at least 18 years old and have at least 250 hours of flight experience.

Education and Training

Military veterans have always been an important source of experienced pilots because of the extensive training and flight time that the military provides. However, an increasing number of people are becoming pilots by attending flight school or taking lessons from a FAA certified instructor. The FAA certifies hundreds of civilian flight schools, including some colleges and universities that offer pilot training as part of an aviation degree. In addition, most airline companies require at least 2 years of college and prefer to hire college graduates. In fact, most pilots today have a bachelor’s degree. Because the number of college-educated applicants continues to increase, many employers are making a college degree an entry-level requirement. Preferred courses for airline pilots include English, math, physics, and aeronautical engineering.

Because pilots must be able to make quick decisions and react appropriately under pressure, airline companies will often reject applicants who do not pass psychological and aptitude tests.
Once hired by an airline, new pilots undergo additional company training that usually includes 6-8 weeks of ground school and 25 hours of additional flight time. After they finish this training, airline pilots must keep their certification by attending training once or twice a year.

Pilot Licenses

Commercial Pilot’s License

All pilots who are paid to transport passengers or cargo must have a commercial pilot’s license. To qualify for this license, applicants must be at least 18 years old and have at least 250 hours of flight experience.
Applicants must also pass a strict physical exam to make sure that they are in good health, must have vision that is correctable to 20/20, and must have no physical handicaps that could impair their performance.
In addition, they must pass a written test that includes questions about safety procedures, navigation techniques, and FAA regulations. Finally, they must demonstrate their flying ability to an FAA-designated examiner.

Instrument rating. To fly during periods of low visibility, pilots must be rated to fly by instruments. They may qualify for this rating by having at least 40 hours of instrument flight experience. Pilots also must pass a written exam and show an examiner their ability to fly by instruments.

Airline certifications. Currently, airline captains must have an airline transport pilot certificate. In 2013, new regulations will require first officers to have this certificate as well. Applicants must be at least 23 years old, have a minimum of 1,500 hours of flight time, and pass written and flight exams. Furthermore, airline pilots usually maintain one or more advanced ratings, depending on the requirements of their particular aircraft.
All licenses are valid as long as a pilot can pass periodic physical, eye, and flight examinations.

Pilot Careers and Advancement

Many civilian pilots start as flight instructors, building up their flight hours while they earn money teaching. As they become more experienced, these instructors can move into jobs as commercial pilots.
Commercial pilots may begin their careers flying charter planes, helicopters, or crop dusters. These positions typically require less experience than airline jobs require. Some commercial pilots may advance to flying corporate planes.

In nonairline jobs, a first officer may advance to captain and, in large companies, to chief pilot or director of aviation. However, many pilots use their commercial experience as a steppingstone to becoming an airline pilot.
Airline pilots may begin as flight engineers or first officers for regional airline companies. Newly hired pilots at regional airline companies typically have about 2,000 hours of flight experience.
Over time, experience gained at these jobs may lead to higher paying jobs with major airline companies. Newly hired pilots at major airline companies typically have about 4,000 hours of flight experience.
For airline pilots, advancement depends on a system of seniority outlined in union contracts. Typically, after 1 to 5 years, flight engineers may advance to first officer and, after 5 to 15 years, to captain.

Flight School and Pilot Training

Aviator Flight Training Academy offers professional pilot training programs with a minimum of 200 hours of multi-engine time. The flight school has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator), large classrooms and individual briefing rooms.

When you choose Aviator, all flight training is logged in aircraft. Our Flight Training Devices (FTDs) are used for ground training purposes only. NO FTDs (SIMULATORS) ARE USED FOR FLIGHT TIME TOWARDS YOUR RATINGS!

This “hands-on” approach provides the best flight training environment for pilots of the future. We encourage training in actual instrument conditions. Flying at the Aviator is 24 hours-a-day, rain or shine. Aviator flight training programs offer more actual multi-engine time than any other school in the country. Our fleet of multi-engine aircraft are equipped with GPS and are being converted to EFIS Systems (Glass Cockpits).

Contact Aviator College via phone, online or schedule a tour.

Mailing Address

Aviator Flight Training Academy
3800 Saint Lucie Boulevard
Fort Pierce, FL 34946
USA

Phone Numbers

(772) 466-4822
1-800-635-9032 (Toll free number)
(772) 489-8383 (Fax)

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