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Does Your Flight School Offer The Best Flight Training Aircrafts

Does Your Flight School Offer The Best Flight Training AircraftsIf flying is your passion invest in time and research to find the best flight instructors and quality flight training programs approved by FAA. What flight training aircraft offered for flight training and how it is maintained is also crucial to your flight training experience.

The Flight Training Airplane

The training airplane is where you practice in the air what you’ve learned on the ground. High wing or low, it doesn’t make much difference. What’s important is how well the airplane is equipped and maintained. It’s also important that the school’s trainers are dedicated to pilot training and not to airplane rental.
How many training airplanes a school has depends on the number of active students. Generally speaking, one trainer serves four or five full-time students. This ratio may be higher with part-time students. Another consideration is the training fleet’s mix of primary, advanced, and multi-engine airplanes.

Because trainers are flown often and sometimes hard, how a flight school maintains its training fleet is important for both safety and scheduling. Asking questions about maintenance policies and procedures should be part of every flight school interview.

You’ll never forget the first airplane you fly. No matter how many other aircraft you may pilot, that first trainer will always have a special place in your heart and your logbook. However, picking the plane or helicopter you learn to fly in should to some degree be based upon your flying goals and your budget. Basic trainers are solid little airplanes with just enough room for you and you instructor. These “two-place” or two-passenger aircraft making learning to fly as easy as possible while keeping your flying cost low. Most are very forgiving to fly and are more tolerant of a beginner’s mistakes. However, they can also be a bit sparse when it comes to equipment and, in some cases, comfort. If you and your wallet are a bit bigger, then you may want to consider learning in a larger four-place (four-passenger) aircraft. Your costs will be higher, but you won’t have to transition or “move up” from your trainer when you want to take your spouse and two children for their first ride. These aircraft also tend to be capable of flying farther and faster, and have more advanced avionics that will help if you later decide to earn your instrument rating. source

The Cessna 172 Skyhawk is one of the most common airplanes used by flight schools. The four-seat airplane can be used for primary and advanced flight training, but it is also a practical rental aircraft for cross-country flights. The Skyhawk’s two doors make boarding very easy for student and instructor alike and provide ample ventilation while on the ground during warm weather. Handling qualities are docile and reasonably well balanced. Because the Skyhawk is the most popular airplane in the world, with more than 40,000 built in the last 50 years, you’ll be able to rent and fly from almost any airport worldwide.

Cessna 150/152

Some people say that since the end of World War II, more pilots have learned to fly in the Cessna 150 or 152 than any other type of airplane. These two Cessna models leave complexity behind in favor of low operating costs, reliability, and ease of use. It’s the docile handling of the two-seat airplanes that makes them so enjoyable to fly. Like everything else in the aircraft’s design, handling characteristics require very little effort. Source

Cessna Flight Training

Why Cessna

For more than eight decades Cessna has been innovating aircraft engineering to lead the world of aviation.
Continuing that tradition of pioneering in aviation technology, we are driven by ingenuity.
Our Expertise

Engineering and design

We have been reinventing the way you fly for more than 85 years. Our aeronautical engineers have imagined hundreds of original aircraft concepts into clean sheet designs advancing to the latest computer-enhanced technology and flight-simulation tools and, finally, to prototype. Because it takes years for a new aircraft to reach its maiden flight, we are always designing for tomorrow’s world.

Aircraft design

Each area of each aircraft design fulfills a function while its form remains noticeably simple.

Safety comes standard

Safety is the top priority for Cessna when designing and manufacturing aircraft. Everything from simple flying procedures to many standard emergency systems help to prevent errors and make handling simple and smooth. Our aircraft are designed both to react effectively to dangerous situations and to avoid them altogether. Combining both active and passive safety features ensures that every new aircraft is designed and equipped to deliver on the trust that passengers place in both pilot and machine every single flight.

Certifications

To prove our commitment to safety, we pursue a number of certification levels for each aircraft we build, including day, night, VFR, IFR, and flight into known icing conditions. Our aircraft are compliant with all RVSM-certification requirements. And, because specific approval is required for flying within civil and international airspace, Cessna offers owners a no-charge service to assist with this process.

Cessna Skyhawk

Introducing the world’s most popular aircraft. With more than 43,000 aircraft with several model variants delivered, the Skyhawk is the best-selling, most-flown plane ever built. It also enjoys a distinguished reputation as the safest general aviation aircraft available. The Skyhawk is a top performer, showcasing the agility, stability, and durable strength that Cessna is famous for.

Cessna engineering team designed the Skyhawk’s cockpit with the latest in avionic technology and the most advanced application of ergonomic sciences available. The flight deck is powered by the Garmin G1000® avionics suite, including optional integrated Garmin Synthetic Vision Technology (SVT™) and an automatic flight control system. Two 10.4-inch, high-resolution liquid crystal displays show flight instrumentation, traffic data, digital altitude, moving maps, navigation, communication, and other real-time flight-critical data.

See the future

The Skyhawk’s flight deck can include the optional Garmin Synthetic Vision Technology (SVT™), which offers sophisticated graphics modeling of terrain, traffic, and obstacles in the flight path. The system looks at the entire flight path via satellite and renders a three-dimensional “virtual reality” landscape, which is displayed on one or both primary flight displays. This technology prepares you for what lies ahead in plenty of time to plan for it and gives you a clear visual of any traffic around your aircraft, even in solid IFR (instrument flight rules) or nighttime VFR (visual flight rules) conditions.

Digital weather radar

With the optional GDL 69A data link receiver and a subscription to XM WX Satellite Weather, you will see a high-resolution representation of the weather along your flight path on your high-resolution primary flight display. The GDL 69 offers NEXRAD, METARs, TAFs, lightning, and more that you can layer directly over optional Jeppesen or standard topographic map databases. Global weather information is available through the optional GSR 56, which connects you to the Iridium satellite network. Voice and text messaging connectivity as well as position reporting and digital color radar data are included.

Skyhawk Performance
  • Maximum Cruise Speed 124 ktas (230 km/h)
  • Maximum Range 610 nm (1,130 km)
  • Takeoff
  • Takeoff Distance
  • Ground Roll
  • 1,630 ft (497 m)
  • 960 ft (293 m)
  • Landing
  • Landing Distance
  • Ground Roll
  • 1,335 ft (407 m)
  • 575 ft (175 m)
  • Maximum Operating Altitude 14,000 ft (4,267 m)
  • Maximum Climb Rate 730 fpm (223 mpm)
  • Maximum Limit Speed 163 kias (302 km/h)
  • Stall Speed 48 kcas (89 km/h)

Source

Aviator Flight Training Aircraft & Maintenance

Our fleet consists of 10 multi-engine and 26 single engine aircraft
The Aviator fleet is made up of multi-engine and single-engine aircraft. The primary aircraft used in our training programs are the Beechcraft BE-76 Duchess, Piper Warrior III PA-28, and the Cessna 172 Skyhawk, all are well known as training aircraft the world over. Our fleet also includes a Piper Arrow and a J-3 Cub. All aircraft are maintained in our maintenance facilities located here at the St. Lucie County International Airport. We average more than 35,000 hours of flight time per year. They are all equipped for VFR and IFR flight per FAR 91.205 (except the J-3 Cub which is VFR Day only).

Beechcraft BE-76 Duchess

The Beechcraft Duchess, also known at the BE-76, was designed as a general aviation, light twin training aircraft. A little sister to the Beechcraft Baron, the Duchess was chosen by Aviator as our multi-engine training aircraft because of the durability built into the product by Beechcraft. All of the Duchess aircraft at Aviator are equipped for instrument operations with an HSI and a VOR; many of the aircraft also have an ADF. Because the future is area navigation (RNAV), we have multiple aircraft equipped with Garmin 430 GPS systems. Having a broad range of learning options is the best way to help ensure future employment. The Duchess fleet is currently being upgraded to ASPEN glass cockpits. Several aircraft are equipped with weather radar and/or lightning strike detectors.

Cessna 172 Skyhawk

The Cessna 172 is the most widely used primary training aircraft in the world. Aviator uses the Cessna for private pilot and single engine training with Garmin EFIS Systems.

Piper Warrior III PA – 128

Aviator College welcomes it’s new fleet of Piper Warrior III airplanes equipped with Avadyne EFIS Systems.

Maintenance

Aviator has its own in-house maintenance facility, a 13,000 square foot environmentally approved hangar. Maintenance is under the supervision of the FAA. All technicians hold Airplane & Powerplant Certificates or better. Maintenance is open six days a week.

Pilot Certificates, Ratings and Endorsements

Pilot Certificates, Ratings and EndorsementsBasic pilot certificates are:

  • Student
  • Sport
  • Recreational
  • Private
  • Commercial
  • Airline Transport Pilot

Examples of other certificates include:

Pilot certificates have associated ratings. All certificates except the student pilot certificate have at least one aircraft category/class rating (e.g., Private Pilot with ASEL rating). A type rating is required for any aircraft over 12,500 lbs MGTOW and/or with a turbojet powerplant. There are also ratings for operating privileges (e.g., instrument rating).
An endorsement attests to the completion of ground and/or flight training required for airman certification testing, or for specific operating privileges. The endorsements required by 14 CFR Part 61 fall into several broad categories:
Student Pilots: Because a student pilot certificate has no aircraft category and class ratings, operating privileges and limitations for solo are conveyed exclusively through instructor endorsements. Endorsements in this category are usually limited not just to category and class, but also to a specific make and model.

Testing for Certificate or Rating: To take a practical test for a pilot certificate or rating, the applicant must have endorsements attesting to aeronautical knowledge and flight proficiency (including aeronautical experience and practical test preparation required in 14 CFR 61.31(a)(6). The flight instructor applicant endorsements for completing the fundamentals of instruction and spin training also fall into this category.

Recurrent Training: To maintain the operating privileges conferred by a pilot certificate or instrument rating, the pilot must have the appropriate endorsement for satisfactory completion of required recurrent training (e.g., flight review or, if needed, instrument proficiency check).

Aircraft Characteristics: The requirement for a type rating is limited to large (greater than 12,500 lbs MGTOW) and turbojet-powered aircraft. However, certain small and piston-powered aircraft have characteristics that require additional training for safe operation. For example, 14 CFR 61.69 specifies training and experience required for towing a glider. Specific aircraft training requirements are outlined in 14 CFR 61.31, and instructor endorsements that attest to the satisfactory completion of this training are the mechanism used to confer the necessary operating privilege.

Endorsements related to aircraft characteristics include those for complex, high performance, high altitude, tailwheel, and glider ground operations. In addition, 14 CFR 61.31(h) provides for “additional aircraft type-specific training” in those cases where the Administrator has determined that such training is required. Source

Pilot Certificates issued by the FAA have the following characteristics:

  • Grade – determines the kinds of flying a pilot can do
  • Student Pilot – local solo training flights without passengers
  • Recreational Pilot – local uncontrolled day flights 1 passenger
  • Private Pilot – flights worldwide with passengers, non-profit
  • Commercial Pilot – paid flying allowed, can be airline copilot
  • Airline Transport Pilot – paid flights, can be airline captain
Ratings

Rating refers to what aircraft a pilot can fly and how – VFR or IFR
Category – Airplane, Glider, Rotorcraft, Lighter Than Air…
Class – example: Airplane Single or Multi-Engine Land/Sea
Type – needed for each turbojet or heavier than 12,500 lbs
Instrument- separate for each Class and Type Rating

The Certificate Grade is the hardest one to change. In order to get a new Grade Certificate you need to meet all the training and experience requirements for that certificate. The process is called upgrading and requires you to have to have the certificate with a lower grade. Student Pilots and Recreational Pilots can upgrade to Private Pilot. Only Private Pilots can upgrade to Commercial Pilot. Finally only Commercial Pilots can upgrade to ATP (Air Transport Pilot). You are always required to take a knowledge test and a practical test in order to upgrade. Source

Adding Ratings within the same aircraft category is significantly easier. Except for the initial instrument rating, there are no knowledge tests or extra aeronautical experience requirements. An instructor endorsement and a practical test is all it takes, and yes – there is some textbook study for the practical test.

Pilot ratings are additional qualifications that you can add to an existing Pilot’s license to enhance your abilities as a pilot. The examples are: Instrument Rating and Multi Engine Rating.

Instrument Rating (IR)

An Instrument Rating (IR) is what’s required to be able to fly an airplane inside and through the clouds, and at times of low visibility. The training involves the pilot to learn how to fly an airplane simply by looking at flight instruments inside the cockpit. If you are on a career path to be an airline pilot then this is a must. IR is a requirement to get a job with an airline, and also to qualify for an Airline Transport Pilot. This is usually obtained after your get your Private Pilot License, and before you get your Commercial Pilot License.

Multi-Engine Rating

Most of your training will be done on single engine airplanes (SE), like Cessna and Piper. However, to qualify for an airline pilot position, you will need to be qualified to fly airplanes with multiple engines. Most airline airplanes have more than one engine. And this training is called Multi-Engine Rating (ME). Most people get their Multi-Engine Rating along with or right after their Commercial Pilot License.

Night Rating

A Night Rating allows the pilot to operate an Aircraft at night and is an excellent way of building hours in a meaningful way. The Private Pilots License syllabus does not include any requirement for night training for the issue of the license. However, should the private pilot wish to fly as PIC at night with or without passengers then the night rating must be obtained.

Pre Entry Requirements:
Night is defined as ’15 minutes after sunset until 15 minutes before sunrise’. To be able to commence training for the night rating, the applicant must be able to produce evidence of having completed a total of 50 hours as Pilot of airplanes and have at least 20 hours as Pilot-in-Command of which 10 hours must have been gained since making an application for the issue of a PPL(A).

Training Required:
The night rating requirements are that a person must complete 10 hours of basic Instrument instruction, 5 of which can be in a Registered Instrument Trainer. After this the Night rating test and the Night cross country is completed.

Building Night Flying Time

At least 3 hours dual instruction including at least one hour of night navigation, 5 Take offs and landings as PIC, and in at least one instance take off and landing should be separate by a complete departure from, and rejoining of, the aerodrome traffic pattern.

Instructor Rating

An Instructors rating allows the holder of the rating to give Flight Instruction to student pilots. It is an excellent way to build hours, but should not be taken lightly, or undertaken simply as a “means to an end”. Every good pilot is not necessarily a good teacher/instructor. In short, don’t do it just to build up hours – you should only become an instructor if teaching is your passion.

Flying is like any other work activity; in the sense that the better qualified you are the better your chances of finding work. An instructor’s rating will give you the edge over a pilot who does not have the rating, providing you with one more avenue that you can use to gain hours and experience. It also adds experience and value to your CV and career in aviation. The instructor’s rating consists of two basic elements:

  • Theory and examinations
  • Practical flying
Get Your Pilot Ratings With Aviator Flight Training Academy

Aviator Flight Training Academy offers professional pilot training programs with a minimum of 200 hours of multi-engine time. The flight school has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator), large classrooms and individual briefing rooms.

Aviator offers a full line of flight training courses to meet the individual needs of each student.

Multi, Instrument, & Commercial
  • 150 Hours of Multi-Engine
  • Cross Country flying coast-to-coast
  • Price includes flight instruction and all ground instruction
  • Course time is eight weeks or less

Writtens and Checkrides are extra
NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time
To enroll you must hold your PPL and 100 hours total time
Eight weeks of housing included (one person per bedroom)
$ 29,995.00
Financing Available for those who qualify

Multi_Engine Rating
  • 10 Hours Multi-Engine
  • Pre & Post Flight, Ground Instruction
  • NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time

$ 3,100.00
Financing Available for those who qualify

Multi-Engine Instructor Rating

5 Hours Multi-Engine
Pre & Post Flight, Ground Instruction
NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time
$ 1,995.00
Financing Available for those who qualify

ATP Multi-Engine Rating

10 Hours Multi-Engine
Pre & Post Flight, Ground Instruction
NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time
$ 3,100.00
Financing Available for those who qualify

Instructor Ratings

Flight Instructor
Flight Instructor Instrument

Multi-Engine Instructor
NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time
$ 7,000.00
Financing Available for those who qualify

Multi-Engine & Initial Instrument Rating

50 Hours Multi-Engine
NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time
$ 15,500.00
Financing Available for those who qualify

Writtens and Checkrides are extra
No Simulators are used for flight time

CONTACT AVIATOR

Flight School Students Can Aspire To Become CFIs

Flight School Students Can Aspire To Become CFIsIn today’s blog we will cover Flight Instructor  profession, requirements and flight training needed to become a Certified Flight Instructor.

As the popular saying goes, “if you cant do, teach”. Some people can do and done both. If you have a passion for flying a plane and a talent to teach the pilot skills you acquired to other students, this information is for you.

Pilot Steps to CFI.
  1. Gain your Private Pilot License (PPL) by enrolling in a flight school or other flight training program with a certified flight instructor.
  2. Get an Instrument Rating. You gain this rating by flying according to instrument flight rules (IFR). This allows you to fly in certain weather conditions such as rain and fog.
  3. Apply for a Commercial Pilot License (CPL). You must be at least 18 years old, have 250 hours of flight time in the air, hold an instrument rating and undergo an additional medical exam.
  4. Seek a Flight Instructor Certificate.

Your commercial pilot license and instrument rating must be issued for the type of aircraft with you will be using for teaching prospective pilots.
Gain a logbook endorsement from an authorized flight instructor that lists time spent learning the fundamentals of flight instruction.
Take and pass a knowledge test for flight instructors.
Complete and pass a practical test for flight instructors.
Prove that you are able to provide sufficient instruction in the areas of spin entry, spins and spin recovery.
Log a minimum of 15 hours of being in command of a pilot. Source

The Flight instructor rating is usually the next pilot license you get after you become a commercial pilot. The one thing needed in order to get to the airlines is flight time or hours. In most cases you will not be able to get a job with a commercial pilot license without at least 1,200 hours. This is the regulation for the FAA part 135 air carriers. These are the small air carriers that fly smaller general aviation airplanes.

The best way to get this time is to get the flight instructor rating and then teach for a local flight school until you can get a job with an air carrier.

In order to get the flight instructor Rating, you will need to have your commercial pilot license. Then you can only teach in airplanes you are rated for with your commercial pilot license.

Flight Instructor Ratings Explained

There are three flight instructor ratings you can get .

  1. Flight instructor Airplane: The First flight instructor rating will allow you to teach private pilots and commercial Pilots.
  2. Instrument Flight Instructor Rating. The instrument Flight Instructor Rating will allow you to teach instruments in the aircraft that are on your flight instructor certificate.
  3. Multi Engine Flight Instructor Rating. The Multi Engine Flight Instructor Rating will allow you to teach students in multi engine airplanes.
Reading Material For Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) Course

 If you are planning to take a CFI course in flight school, especially if it is an accelerated course, self-preparation is the key. Below is a suggested reading material.

  1. Advanced Pilot Flight Manual by William K Kershner
  2. Aviation Weather and Weather Services
  3. Practical Test Standards for Private Pilot ASEL
  4. Practical Test Standards for Commercial Pilot ASEL
  5. Aviation Instructor’s Handbook – 8083-9
  6. Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge – 8083-25
  7. Airplane Flying Handbook – 8083-3A
  8. Private Pilot Oral Exam Guide
  9. Commercial Pilot Oral Exam Guide
  10. Certified Flight Instructor Oral Exam Guide
  11. FAR/AIM
  12. Flight Instructor for ASEL and Sea Practical Test Standards
  13. Advisory Circulars listed in the Flight Instructor Practical Test Standard book
FAA Flight Instructor Training Package at Aviator Flight Training Academy

If you are looking to launch your Professional Pilot Career as a Certified Flight Instructor, then Aviator has the Instructor Course that’s right for you. You will receive up to 120 hours of ground instruction under the supervision of a Gold Seal Flight Instructor. In addition, you will receive the highest quality flight instruction necessary to become a superior flight instructor.

Requirements: FAA Single and Multi-engine Commercial Ratings with a minimum of 15 hours Multi-Engine PIC time.

Aviator FAA-approved training curriculum for the Certified Flight Instructor ratings includes:

  • Multi-Engine Flight Instructor
  • Single Engine Flight Instructor
  • Instrument Flight Instructor
  • Up to 120 Hours of Ground Training
  • 21 Hours of Flight Training
  • Spin Training

Course Duration: two months
Job opportunities for those who qualify
$ 7,000.00

Contact Aviator
To speak with an flight instructor contact Aviator at 772-672-8222.

Renewing Your Flight Instructor Certificate

Your Flight Instructor Certificate expires exactly 24 months from the time you completed the renewal requirements or received your certificate.

The FAA outlines several opportunities to renew your certificate with and without additional testing.

  • Decide to take a practical test for a rating listed on your certificate or for an additional flight instructor rating. This test must be successfully passed.
  • Opt to complete and submit an application to the FAA showing that you have had at least 5 students endorsed for a practical test within the last 2 years and that at least 80% of those students have been successful on the test with their first attempt.
  • Provide proof that you have taken on the role as a company check pilot, company check airman, chief flight instructor or flight instructor or been in a position where you regularly evaluated pilots. This all must have taken place within the previous 2 years.
  • Take a flight instructor refresher course no more than 3 months before applying for renewal. Check with the FAA website for schools and locations offering such courses.
  • Provide proof that you have taken and passed an instructor pilot check from the U.S. Armed Forces.

§ 61.197 Renewal requirements for flight instructor certification.
(a) A person who holds a flight instructor certificate that has not expired may renew that flight instructor certificate by—
(1) Passing a practical test for—
(i) One of the ratings listed on the current flight instructor certificate; or
(ii) An additional flight instructor rating; or
(2) Submitting a completed and signed application with the FAA and satisfactorily completing one of the following renewal requirements—
(i) A record of training students showing that, during the preceding 24 calendar months, the flight instructor has endorsed at least 5 students for a practical test for a certificate or rating and at least 80 percent of those students passed that test on the first attempt.
(ii) A record showing that, within the preceding 24 calendar months, the flight instructor has served as a company check pilot, chief flight instructor, company check airman, or flight instructor in a part 121 or part 135 operation, or in a position involving the regular evaluation of pilots.
(iii) A graduation certificate showing that, within the preceding 3 calendar months, the person has successfully completed an approved flight instructor refresher course consisting of ground training or flight training, or a combination of both.
(iv) A record showing that, within the preceding 12 months from the month of application, the flight instructor passed an official U.S. Armed Forces military instructor pilot proficiency check.
(b) The expiration month of a renewed flight instructor certificate shall be 24 calendar months from—
(1) The month the renewal requirements of paragraph (a) of this section are accomplished; or
(2) The month of expiration of the current flight instructor certificate provided—
(i) The renewal requirements of paragraph (a) of this section are accomplished within the 3 calendar months preceding the expiration month of the current flight instructor certificate, and
(ii) If the renewal is accomplished under paragraph (a)(2)(iii) of this section, the approved flight instructor refresher course must be completed within the 3 calendar months preceding the expiration month of the current flight instructor certificate.
(c) The practical test required by paragraph (a)(1) of this section may be accomplished in a flight simulator or flight training device if the test is accomplished pursuant to an approved course conducted by a training center certificated under part 142

Flight Instructor Refresher Course (AOPA)

Only the Air Safety Institute offers the most comprehensive FAA-approved renewal program available.
Renew anytime during your 4 month renewal period and maintain your original expiration date. Guaranteed!

In-Person FIRC
More than 90 locations
2-day seminar format
Learn with your peers.
$235 pre-registration fee ($250 at the door)

Online FIRC
Online renewal processing – no need to leave home or mail paperwork.
Receive credit for completed Air Safety Institute courses taken.
Learn at your own pace.
Just $124
Visit AOPA for details.

Multi Engine Flight Training And Time Building

Multi Engine Flight Training And Time BuildingAn applicant for a multi-engine rating is usually already a private pilot or commercial pilot. Most flight school and insurance companies have a minimum flight time for the mult-engine rating, usually somewhere between 5 to 10 hours of dual instruction.

FAR 61.63(c) Additional class rating. Any person who applies for an additional class rating to be added on a pilot certificate:
  • Must have an endorsement in his or her logbook or training record from an authorized instructor and that endorsement must attest that the applicant has been found competent in the aeronautical knowledge areas appropriate to the pilot certificate for the aircraft class rating sought;
  • Must have an endorsement in his or her logbook or training record from an authorized instructor, and that endorsement must attest that the applicant has been found proficient in the areas of operation appropriate to the pilot certificate for the aircraft class rating sought;
  • Must pass the required practical test that is appropriate to the pilot certificate for the aircraft class rating sought;
  • Need not meet the specified training time requirements prescribed by this part that apply to the pilot certificate for the aircraft class rating sought unless the person holds a lighter-than-air category rating with a balloon class rating and is seeking an airship class rating and
  • Need not take an additional knowledge test, provided the applicant holds an airplane, rotorcraft, powered-lift, or airship rating at that pilot certificate level.
FAA Multi-Engine Add-On Training

Why learn to fly multi-engine aircraft?

  • Extra Engine – additional engine means additional safety, redundancy
  • Faster Travel – ability to travel faster to a destination
  • Career Building – multi-engine experience required prior to entering professional aviation industry
  • Personal Challenge – upgrade your knowledge, judgement, and piloting skill
What are the requirements for the Multi-Engine Land add-on?

There are no minimum time requirements for the MEL class rating, however, only an instructor sign-off for both flight and ground training. The Multi-Engine Land rating is “added on” to your existing Single-Engine Land Private, Commercial, or ATP certificate. For the full add-on, both VFR and IFR operations will be emphasized, however, there are options for VFR Only and Center-Line Thrust restricted certification.

Generally, the multi-engine training course is at minimum 10 hours of flight time in the Piper Seminole and 5 hours of ground training with an MEI. Depending on proficiency, availability, and skill, you may need more than the recommended minimum times. Also, there is no additional written exam for the add-on, only the required oral and flight exams.

Multi Engine Time Building From Aviator Flight Training Academy

For more than 31 years Aviator has been the leader in multi-engine flight training. We have provided over 5000 professional pilots to the airline industry, both nationally and worldwide, through our Professional Pilot Flight Training Programs.

Our Professional Pilot Program is set in a flight training, structured environment to ensure the student receives the knowledge that is required to be a professional pilot. This program is from 0 hours to over 250 hours, of which 200 hours will be multi-engine time. The program includes Private Pilot Single Engine through the Multi-Engine Flight Instructor Certificate. Cross Country flying is coast-to-coast, if desired.

Build Multi-Engine Time

Our “Twin-Time Pilot” program offers 100 hours of Multi-Engine flight time anywhere within the Continental United States and the Caribbean. Aviator’s twin time program operates 24 hours-a-day, (24×7) rain or shine.

Lacking actual IMC flight time? Aviator encourages flights into IMC. We operate a fleet of Beechcraft Duchess, the majority of which are fully equipped with weather radar, Garmin 430, HSI, DME, and Intercoms. Fleet of aircraft are now being converted to EFIS systems “Glass Cockpit”

50 hr. Multi Engine time building $ 6,292.50
75 hr. Multi Engine time building $ 8,955.00
100 hr. Multi Engine time building $ 11,617.50

Price Includes 5 hour Check out, Sales Tax, Insurance, & Fuel at $5.00 per gallon
Housing available for $ 650.00 per month or less

Featuring Beechcraft Aircraft
Garmin

Our airplanes are maintained under 100-hour inspection programs which are provided by our own maintenance facility. If you are interested in acquiring additional ratings, please call our office for a quote. If you are not seeking an additional rating there is a 5 hour checkout billed at our dual rate that you will do with one of our highly qualified instructors. This checkout will include 5 hours of dual flight time and ground instruction on the airplane’s systems and procedures. The 5 hour checkout and the additional ratings (up to 10 hours) are flown within 50 hours. This checkout will come out of the first 5 hours of your time building time. We offer insurance for $1.00 per flight hour, which will cover the $ 5,000.00 deductible for any damage that may occur during your flight.

Pilots View On Instrument Rating

October 14, 2013 Leave a comment

Pilots View On Instrument RatingPilots that want to fly in the clouds need to get an instrument rating added on to their private or commercial pilot certificate. Most professional aviation businesses require pilots to be instrument-rated, anyway, so it’s a necessary step for those who might want to become airline pilot or corporate pilot. The ability to fly solely by reference to instruments in the aircraft means than a pilot isn’t limited to good-weather operations. An instrument pilot can legally fly in the clouds, rain and fog, which broadens his or her abilities and keeps them in the air instead of on the ground during inclement weather.

An applicant for an instrument rating needs to be extremely precise and detail-oriented. He or she must be able to follow procedures and multi-task to a higher level than before. Since flying in inclement weather with no visual reference to the ground can be dangerous, instrument training requires a great deal of professionalism and leaves no room for mistakes or carelessness.

If you’re trained well and take it seriously, IFR flight can be very rewarding. It will definitely broaden your proficiency as a pilot, and in no time, you’ll be flying among airline pilots and other commercial pilots!

Instrument Rating Pilot Courses At Aviator Flight Training Academy

The Aviator Flight Training Academy offers a full line of flight training courses to meet the individual needs of each student.

Multi-Engine & Initial Instrument Rating

50 Hours Multi-Engine
NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time
$ 15,500.00
Financing Available for those who qualify
Writtens and Checkrides are extra
No Simulators are used for flight time

Confessions of an Instrument Pilot

Bob Knill is an instrument-rated private pilot with more than 300 hours. He is an information specialist for AOPA.

A year ago I raced through my instrument training, learning just what I needed to know to pass my checkride and fly legally into instrument meteorological conditions (IMC). At least, according to the FAA’s minimum standards. I met the requirements, proved my practical skills, and shook the examiner’s hand at the end of the flight. But that doesn’t mean I’m comfortable with exercising that privilege. Now I find myself anxious about flying an approach or filing an IFR flight plan without another instrument-rated pilot beside me.

Why is that? Doesn’t having my IFR ticket mean I am at the top of my game at this point in my flying? Why should it intimidate me? I haven’t flown an approach, real or simulated, in more than eight months. I lost faith in my abilities to interpret and visualize an approach. The idea of copying and flying a clearance that deviated from what I had planned puts me on edge. Did I not exercise my privileges because I lost faith in my abilities, or lose faith in my skills because I wasn’t flying IFR flight plans? Regardless of the answer, the simple fact remains: I wouldn’t dream of flying an approach today (even if I didn’t need an instrument proficiency check) without a CFII next to me. In my mind, if I had trained harder, I wouldn’t feel so uncomfortable with IFR flight today.

There are 10 things I would have changed during my instrument training:

10. Fly more actual IMC.

During my instrument training, I logged a total of 0.5 hours of actual IMC time. All of it occurred during the en-route portion of our long cross-country training flight. Yes, I became disoriented by the milky clouds outside my windows. Yes, I forced myself to trust my instruments, even as my kinesthetic senses were screaming that we were turning left (when in reality we were straight and level). My instructor only let me deviate about 10 degrees off course.
“So where are we going?” he asked as I slowly banked the Cessna 172 to the right.
“We’re slowly turning left,” I replied.
“You sure?”
No, I wasn’t sure until I confirmed our heading with the directional gyro, magnetic compass, and turn coordinator. I was so focused on maintaining altitude that I held my heading properly. But it didn’t feel like it. Our training flights were primarily done in the morning, before work. Had we scheduled more afternoon flights, we could have taken advantage of the hazy mid-Atlantic conditions that simulate actual IMC better than the cool, clear skies of sunrise. Why not add as much reality into your training sessions as you can?

9. Fly more full IFR flights.

Most of our training revolved around practicing approaches. Because approaches are what the practical exam would focus on, that’s what training emphasizes. Like many who learn to fly at a nontowered field, talking to ATC on any level intimidated me—it still does. So the extra anxiety of filing a flight plan and then copying down a clearance and reading it back correctly didn’t exactly fit my idea of a good time. What if we were given a clearance that differed from what we filed? Could I plan that new route and tune my navigation instruments properly while managing all of the tasks of takeoff? After all, ATC is expecting us to be rolling within minutes of giving us our clearance. That is a lot to manage at one time.
I wish we had spent more time flying IFR flight plans from start to finish. Many instrument students accomplish this as they build their cross-country time to meet the requirements. Having all the necessary cross-country time before beginning IFR training actually was a handicap. Don’t worry about logging that cross-country time—it’s better to build it during instrument training, when you can grasp the whole process simultaneously.

8. Practice writing down clearances.

This is a great exercise for those days you can’t get into the cockpit. I like to think of it as bar flying. Sitting down for a frosty beverage with your instructor as he reads off a clearance while you copy it down and read it back to him is a good way to familiarize yourself with the terminology
of the IFR flight plan. Take that a step further—lay out an en route chart while you’re doing this, and have your instructor clear you for a route you didn’t anticipate. Explain how you would set up your radios to intercept that intersection you need to fly directly to.

Take the Air Safety Institute’s course, Say It Right: Mastering Radio Communication for IFR operations. Or drop a few bucks and pick up some IFR communication software. These DVD sets allow you to simulate IFR communication with nothing more than a computer, speakers, and a microphone.

7. Fly approaches to as many different airports as practical.

We spent a lot of time practicing the exact approaches I would need to perform on my checkride—all three of them. When the big day arrived, I knew those approaches like the back of my hand. But in practical terms, I would have been intimidated if I had to fly an approach at a different airport. There is no reason you can’t practice an ILS approach at an airport other than where you train. A VOR approach at your home airport can be a lot different than the VOR approach at the airport 30 minutes away. Become comfortable with different approaches.

6. Train in aircraft with different avionics.

Fly an automatic direction finder (ADF) approach just to see how they operate. Train for a distance measuring equipment (DME) arc in case you one day have to fly one. At least you will know what they are. Inevitably, if you keep flying you will encounter different aircraft with different avionics. While they may all do the same thing, the way they do them can be vastly different. Can you program a GPS approach in a Garmin G1000? How about a Bendix/King KLN94? Learning different avionics before you develop habits and fall into a comfort zone keeps you on your toes.
I completed all my training in the airplane I flew for my checkride: a 1976 Cessna 172 with two VOR radios, one of which had a glideslope indicator. The airplane met the IFR certification requirements, and was maintained to do so. But it also meant I could only fly a VOR approach, a localizer approach, and an ILS approach. No GPS, no ADF, nothing fancy. Training for my instrument rating in an airplane that didn’t have a GPS addressed a previous overreliance on the GPS, and certainly improved my VOR skills—but I spent very little time learning GPS approaches because I couldn’t shoot one in that 172.

There is a flip side to this coin. Instrument training is taxing, challenging you mentally and physically. You may be forced to fly more precisely than you have in the past. Mixing up avionics may be too much when everything else drops on you. Training solely in one airplane did stack the odds in my favor for the checkride.

5. Fly with different instructors periodically.

Use different instructors as checkups. Each instructor has his or her own style of teaching, and you can benefit from the strengths of each instructor you fly with. I had a great instrument instructor, but a different one would have given me another perspective or way of doing things.
A few months after my checkride I flew with another CFII, and kept overcorrecting while on final for the ILS. This instructor gave me a pointer on using the rudder to keep myself lined up on the approach path. While this technique may not have been accepted on the checkride, kicking a quick jab of rudder to momentarily bring the nose of the airplane around worked to keep me lined up with the runway. I never even thought to use this technique during my initial training.

4. Chair fly.

Close your eyes, open a book of approach plates to a random approach, and pick one. Mentally step through it. Tell yourself where you would begin the approach if coming from all four cardinal directions. Imagine yourself tuning your VORs or pressing the proper buttons on your GPS to get it set up. Picture yourself setting the power. What will your power settings need to be to get to the proper altitude at your initial approach fix, but not below? You may surprise yourself and notice a situation that you have a question about—ask your instructor. It is far better to run into a scenario on the ground than to have to deal with it in IMC, when there’s no one around to ask.
The best part about this exercise is that it won’t cost you any money. It is a great way to kill time on the train to work, on your lunch break, or while waiting for your coffee and bagel. You can carry around approach plates relatively easily. The psychological effect of knowing you are still learning, even when you aren’t flying, is liberating.

3. Slow down a bit.

Having met all of the cross-country PIC time requirements allowed me to hit the approaches fast and furiously. I burned through my instrument training and came out three months later as an instrument-rated pilot. But I never really cemented the skills or knowledge because I didn’t give myself time to absorb what I was learning.
Some will suggest that you learn what’s required to pass your checkride, then gain comfort with it later. I don’t like that approach. Having an IFR ticket doesn’t mean you should jump into the soup immediately just because the FAA says you can. Start with very generous weather limitations, and work your way to lower ceilings and reduced visibility.

2. Read…and learn.

A few months ago I was listening to the Air Safety Institute’s Real Pilot Stories about a vacuum failure in IMC. I asked myself how I would respond in that situation. Would I have the presence of mind to realize what was happening? Sadly, I had to be honest and answer no.

Learn from others and practice this scenario. Try to make your training as real as possible. Tell your instructor to start unexpectedly throwing curve balls at you by covering up various instruments.
Go beyond training materials to gather any information related to IFR flying. Hang out on the AOPA Forums. Listen to other pilot stories. Question whether or not you would have the wherewithal to respond properly to others’ misfortunes. If not, incorporate that into your training. Go beyond what the PTS requires you to learn. If you experience different scenarios during your initial instrument training, your brain is already primed to incorporate the new material—if you wait six months, it will be more difficult.

1. Practice, practice, practice.

I unnecessarily put myself into a time crunch with my training. I passed the instrument knowledge test well before beginning the flight training. Then life happened. Suddenly, I had just four months to pass my checkride before all of that time and energy would be in vain. So I focused on doing exactly what I needed to do, learning exactly what I needed to learn, to pass the checkride.
The night before my checkride, I flew one more practice flight to polish my approaches. My instructor, not the one from whom I received most of my training, sat in the right seat. My holding patterns felt wrong, I blew my altitude on the ILS approach, and just felt as though I performed terribly overall.
“I am so going to fail this tomorrow,” I said dejectedly.
She replied, “If I had a nickel for every student who said that before their checkride, I wouldn’t need to work any more.”
I passed. But I felt as though I cheated the system. Luckily, I know my limits. I know my comfort zone and I know that I need to expand it. Like any skill, practice is paramount. Instrument flying is a skill that needs to be developed, honed, and sharpened. Constantly. Training shouldn’t begin—or end—with that handshake from the examiner. Source

Multi Engine Time Flight Training

Multi Engine Time Flight Training

The Requirements for Obtaining A Multi Engine Add-on Rating To an Existing Pilot Certificate:
  • You must hold at least a Private Pilot Certificate.
  • Must be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English language.
  • Hold at least a current third-class FAA medical certificate.
  • Undertake required training as described in Flight Lessons and Ground Lessons found listed below. Many of the Flight Lessons will require more than one flight to make you comfortable and proficient
  • Recieve a signed recommendation (8710), from a MEI, that you are competent as an multi engine pilot and ready for the multi engine add-on rating checkride.
  • Must successfully complete a practical test given by an FAA-designated pilot examiner.
Flight Time Requirements:

If you are adding on a Multi Engine Rating to a Private or Commercial certificate, you will have already met the time requirements. The maneuvers for the private and commercial certificate are the same, but the standards are more demanding for the commercial.

If you are obtaining an initial Multi Engine Commercial Certificate (i.e. you hold a Private Pilot Single Engine Land Certificate only and you want to obtain a Commercial Multi-Engine Certificate) you will need to meet the aeronautical knowledge plus minimum eligibility requirements for the certificate you are seeking (PIC in MEL). Keep in mind that a Multi engine aircraft is considered a complex aircraft, thus meeting that requirement toward the Commercial Rating. Source

IMC

Instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) is an aviation flight category that describes weather conditions that require pilots to fly primarily by reference to instruments, and therefore under Instrument Flight Rules (IFR), rather than by outside visual references under Visual Flight Rules (VFR). Typically, this means flying in cloud or bad weather. Pilots sometimes train to fly in these conditions with the aid of products like Foggles, specialized glasses that restrict outside vision, forcing the student to rely on instrument indications only.

With good visibility, pilots can determine the attitude of the aircraft by utilising visual cues from outside the aircraft, most significantly the horizon. Without such external visual cues, pilots must use an internal cue of attitude, which is provided by gyroscopically-driven instruments such as the attitude indicator (“artificial horizon”). The availability of a good horizon cue is controlled by meteorological visibility, hence minimum visibility limits feature in the VMC minima. Visibility is also important to avoid terrain.

Because the basic traffic avoidance principle of flying under Visual Flight Rules (VFR) is to “see and avoid”, it follows that distance from clouds is an important factor in the VMC minima: as aircraft in clouds cannot be seen, a buffer zone from clouds is required.

Can You Log PIC Flight Time In IMC Without An Instrument Rating?

According to a December 14, 2011 Legal Interpretation, yes! The FAA was presented with a scenario in which Pilot A and Pilot B both hold airplane single-engine land private pilot certificates. They fly a cross-country trip together in a single-engine land airplane. The flight is conducted in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) under an IFR flight plan filed by Pilot A, who is instrument rated, while Pilot B is not. Although Pilot A acts as the actual PIC for the entire flight, for a half-hour leg of the flight during IMC, Pilot B is the sole manipulator of the controls. The FAA was then asked the question “whether Pilot B can log actual instrument and PIC flight time for the portion of the flight during which Pilot B was the sole manipulator of the controls.”

The Interpretation initially noted that for the purpose of logging PIC time under FAR 61.51(e), a pilot must hold ratings for the aircraft (category, class and type, if a type rating is required), rather than for the conditions of flight. It then concluded that even though Pilot B was not instrument rated and the flight was conducted in IMC, Pilot B could log PIC flight time for the portion of the flight during which Pilot B was the sole manipulator of the controls since he was properly rated in the aircraft. The FAA went on to note that Pilot B could also log actual instrument time for the portion of the flight during which Pilot B was the sole manipulator of the controls under FAR 61.51(g)(1).

Next, the Interpretation addressed the logging of flight time by Pilot A. According to FAR 61.51 (e)(1)(iii), a pilot acting as PIC may only log PIC time if more than one pilot is required under the aircraft’s type certificate or the regulations under which the flight is conducted. Since only one pilot was required for the flight in the scenario presented to the FAA, the Interpretation concluded that Pilot A could not log PIC time for the portion of the flight during which Pilot B was the sole manipulator of the controls. The FAA reached this conclusion in spite of the fact that Pilot B could not act as PIC (no instrument rating) and Pilot B was not a required flight crew member for any portion of the flight under the aircraft’s type certificate or the regulations under which the flight was conducted.

What can we learn from this Interpretation? For starters, the regulations distinguish between “acting” as PIC and “logging flight time” as PIC. So, it is possible that by “acting” as PIC you can have the responsibility of a PIC, along with the potential liability, but you can’t log that flight time as PIC. Doesn’t seem fair, but that’s what the regulations provide. Source

Multi Engine Time Building & Flight Training Specials From Aviator Flight Training Academy

Our “Twin-Time Pilot” program offers 100 hours of Multi-Engine flight time anywhere within the Continental United States and the Caribbean. Aviator’s twin time program operates 24 hours-a-day, (24×7) rain or shine.

Lacking actual IMC flight time?

Aviator encourages flights into IMC. We operate a fleet of Beechcraft Duchess, the majority of which are fully equipped with weather radar, Garmin 430, HSI, DME, and Intercoms. Fleet of aircraft are now being converted to EFIS systems “Glass Cockpit”

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What Pilots Should Know About Night Flying

What Pilots Should Know About Night FlyingVisual Flight Rules (VFR) – set of regulations under which a pilot operates an aircraft in weather conditions generally clear enough to allow the pilot to see where the aircraft is going. Specifically, the weather must be better than basic VFR weather minimal, i.e. in visual meteorological conditions (VMC), as specified in the rules of the relevant aviation authority. The pilot must be able to operate the aircraft with visual reference to the ground, and by visually avoiding obstructions and other aircraft.

IFR

FAA’s Instrument Flying Handbook defines IFR as: “Rules and regulations established by the FAA to govern flight under conditions in which flight by outside visual reference is not safe. IFR flight depends upon flying by reference to instruments in the flight deck, and navigation is accomplished by reference to electronic signals
Flying at night requires an understanding of how darkness affects a pilot’s vision and what you can do to make sure you make the most of your night-limited vision.

The most important aspect of night flying with respect to vision acuity is to realize that it takes 30 to 45 minutes for your eyes to fully adapt to minimal light conditions. And if you look directly at a bright light for more than about a second, you’ll need to start the clock all over again and reacclimatize to the darkness.

That’s why it’s important to turn down cockpit lighting at night and avoid looking directly at bright lights. This process should start on the ramp before you ever climb into the cockpit, giving your eyes time to adjust before takeoff. Once in the air, if you need a flashlight, use one that allows you to turn down the gain so you don’t overdo the brightness and start back at square one.

It’s also important to understand that it can take longer to find certain controls in a dark cockpit and plan for that fact. If you’re a renter and fly a number of different airplanes, you’ll want to be certain you are completely familiar with the cockpit of any aircraft you will fly at night.

One way to accomplish this is to perform a blind cockpit check. To do this, sit behind the controls of the airplane during the day, close your eyes and try to locate the throttle, mixture and prop controls; light switches; landing gear, carb heat and flap levers; radios and GPS navigators; critical circuit breakers; altimeter and heading indicator knobs, and anything else you’ll need to manipulate in flight.

Subtle differences even among the same type of airplane can add to the time it takes to find a particular knob or dial. If you can locate them all bind-folded, you’ll be much better prepared when flying at night. Source

Flying VFR Like IFR
Identify the Risks

The key to making VFR flight safer is to fly like the airlines do. Of course, that’s not always possible. A Bonanza pilot flying a 500 nm trip to an unfamiliar small airport doesn’t have the second pilot, the second (turbofan) engine, the dispatchers watching his back or the same level of required recurrent training as airline pilots have. While flights of small airplanes come to harm for many reasons, the biggest risk factors can be summed up in three main categories: weather, terrain and loss of control. If we were to remove these offenders from the record, light airplane accidents likely would be cut by far more than half.

Use the Tools of IFR

The key to far safer VFR flight is to fly predictably and to avoid the big areas of risk. That means borrowing everything you can from the IFR playbook to keep from hitting the ground unexpectedly, which never ends well.

Fly the Airways

A great approach on this flight if you’re VFR-only is to ditch the “direct to” button on the navigator and fly airways. I can’t stress enough how much just this tactic can help. For one, most airways will follow the lowest terrain along your route of flight (that’s why they were invented, remember), so you don’t have to figure out your terrain clearance. The airways have done it for you. In good weather this helps you figure out your desired altitudes ahead of time, so you know if there’s a healthy climb required ahead. When the weather’s bad, it gives you an out.

Stock Your Tool Bag

Being too low en route seldom (not never) causes accidents in clear weather. It’s when the weather gets dicey that things get hairy. The two biggest tools to have at your disposal are, one, being able to keep your airplane under control if you somehow lose visual reference and, two, having a way of knowing where the terrain is to avoid hitting it if you were to go IMC. If you’re flying the airways when this happens, unless there’s severe ice or convection, there’s no emergency involved. You just keep flying the airplane by reference to the instruments. Remember, the single biggest risk with inadvertent VFR into IMC is losing control of the airplane. Source

Individual Flight Training Courses at Aviator Flight Training Academy

The Aviator Flight Training Academy offers a full line of flight training courses to meet the individual needs of each student.

Multi, Instrument, & Commercial
  • 150 Hours of Multi-Engine
  • Cross Country flying coast-to-coast
  • Price includes flight instruction and all ground instruction
  • Course time is eight weeks or less
  • Writtens and Checkrides are extra
  • NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time
  • To enroll you must hold your PPL and 100 hours total time
  • Eight weeks of housing included (one person per bedroom)

$ 33,561.00
Financing Available for those who qualify

Multi_Engine Rating
  • 10 Hours Multi-Engine
  • Pre & Post Flight, Ground Instruction
  • NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time
  • $ 3,100.00
  • Financing Available for those who qualify
  • Multi-Engine Instructor Rating
  • 5 Hours Multi-Engine
  • Pre & Post Flight, Ground Instruction
  • NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time

$ 1,995.00
Financing Available for those who qualify

ATP Multi-Engine Rating
  • 10 Hours Multi-Engine
  • Pre & Post Flight, Ground Instruction
  • NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time

$ 3,100.00
Financing Available for those who qualify

Instructor Ratings
  • Flight Instructor
  • Flight Instructor Instrument
  • Multi-Engine Instructor
  • NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time
  • $ 7,000.00
  • Financing Available for those who qualify
  • Multi-Engine & Initial Instrument Rating
  • 50 Hours Multi-Engine
  • NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time

$ 15,500.00
Financing Available for those who qualify

Writtens and Checkrides are extra
No Simulators are used for flight time

Contact Aviator for the flight training programs, details and commercial specials.

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