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Archive for June, 2013

Young Pilots Exhibit Their Talents At Pensacola Beach Air Show

Young Pilots Exhibit Their Talents At Pensacola Beach Air ShowEven without the world-famous U.S. Navy Blue Angels, whose demonstration season was canceled due to federal budget cuts, the air show will go on over Pensacola Beach on July 12-13.
Organizers with the Santa Rosa Island Authority released a schedule today of aerial acts and a concert that they hope will draw crowds to the 2013 Pensacola Beach Air Show, which is traditionally the island’s biggest tourist draw of the year.

“We have twenty-four air craft that will be flying from 1:00 p.m. until 3:30 p.m. both days,” SRIA Executive Director Buck Lee said in a news release. “Normally a civilian act of this magnitude would cost up to $25.00 per person, but ours is free to the public. We hope next year the United States Navy’s flight demonstration squadron, the Navy Blue Angels, will be able to return for our air show, as they will surely be missed this year.”

The Pensacola Beach Air Show has featured acts in addition to the Blue Angels for years. Last year, AL.com flew with Team RV, a civilian air show team that was scheduled to perform at last year’s show but were unable to perform due to inclement weather.

The 2013 Pensacola Beach Air Show scheduled lineup includes Kevin Coleman, who at only 21 years old is one of the youngest air show celebrities in the world, and Gary Ward, who is the first pilot to begin flying the high-powered MX2 in air shows.
Skip Stewart is an Aerobatic Champion who has won several gold medals in regional competitions and has been awarded two Pitts Trophies. Lima Lima, new to the Pensacola Beach Air Show, stresses precision formation flying from the six ship wedge and double arrowhead to the basic figure four and diamond formations.
Red Star & The Dragon features 800 mph head-on merges between Red Star, a Viper-29, and The Dragon, a BAC-167 Strikemaster. Otto the Helicopter is the only helicopter to perform in the Pensacola Beach Air Show. Known for blowing bubbles, playing with his yo-yo and shooting smoke in all directions, Otto is a true crowd favorite, especially the younger fans.

Team Aerodynamix, the world’s largest air show team, provides an exciting and memorable performance that combines precision formation flying and formation acrobatics.  Source

Whether you are new to aviation, wanting to add an additional rating, a seasoned pilot looking for recurrency training or just want to rent an aircraft, Florida is the best place for flight training opportunities.

Flight School and Flight Training Programs

For more than 31 years Aviator has been the leader in multi-engine flight training. We have provided over 5000 professional pilots to the airline industry, both nationally and worldwide, through our Professional Pilot Flight Training Programs. Our FAA-certified Part 141 approved flight programs provide students with the skills and experience demanded by today’s commercial aviation industry. Aviator is accredited by the ACCSC (Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges).

Our Professional Pilot Program is set in a flight training, structured environment to ensure the student receives the knowledge that is required to be a professional pilot. This program is from 0 hours to over 250 hours, of which 200 hours will be multi-engine time. The program includes Private Pilot Single Engine through the Multi-Engine Flight Instructor Certificate. Cross Country flying is coast-to-coast, if desired.

When you choose Aviator, all flight training is logged in aircraft. Our Flight Training Devices (FTDs) are used for ground training purposes only. NO FTDs (SIMULATORS) ARE USED FOR FLIGHT TIME TOWARDS YOUR RATINGS!

This “hands-on” approach provides the best flight training environment for pilots of the future. We encourage training in actual instrument conditions. Flying at the Aviator is 24 hours-a-day, rain or shine. Aviator flight training programs offer more actual multi-engine time than any other school in the country. Our fleet of multi-engine aircraft are equipped with GPS and are being converted to EFIS Systems (Glass Cockpits). Come and take a tour and see the Aviator difference.

Individual Flight Training Courses

The Aviator Flight Training Academy offers a full line of flight training courses to meet the individual needs of each student.

Contact Aviator
Schedule A Visit

Distributed by Viestly

Foreign Pilot License Verification and Requirements

Foreign Pilot License Verification and Requirements

The JAA

The Joint Aviation Authority (JAA) is an associated body of the European Civil Aviation Conference which represents civil aviation regulatory authority for a number of European States who agreed to co-operate in development and implementation of common regulatory safety standards and procedures.

Private Pilot License in Europe (JAA)

To obtain a PPL in Europe you either have to join a flight school or become member of a flight club. The availability of training facilities vary depending on where in Europe you live, but if you want to obtain a private pilot license for leisure flying a flight club is usually the cheapest alternative.

Before getting the PPL you need a certain amount of training. You need a minimum of 40 hours flight time (most students have an average of 60-80 hours much depending on how often they fly) and you have to pass a written exam.

The written exam consists of 7 topics put together in a written multiple-choice test. As the theory is pretty time consuming most flight clubs or flight schools recommend you don’t fly very much before passing the exam.

Ones the written exam is out of the way you can concentrate on the flying. For the first 15-20 hours you and your instructor will cover the basics needed to safely maneuver an aircraft. You learn how to take off, climb, turn, decent and land. When your instructor feels comfortable you can do this safely he signs you of for a solo flight.

The next 20-50 hours are dominated by flights with your instructor, cross country flights to learn how to properly navigate, solo training flights and solo cross country flights. When your instructor feels the necessary skill level is reached he signs you up for a “check ride”.

A “check ride” is conducted by a certified examiner and usually done in the airplane you learned how to fly. You start by having a short oral exam. Here you are asked some questions to test the knowledge level and you cover a pre-planned cross country flight. After passing the oral you fly. After passing the oral part of the “check ride” you fly.

The flying part of the PPL check ride takes from an hour to an hour and a half. Here you cover the basic maneuvers, navigation skills and take offs and landings. Often the ride is started of as a cross country flight where you fly the first check points on the cross country route before doing maneuvers and finish of with landing rounds at the airport.

After passing the check ride the examiner issue you a PPL and you are now a JAA pilot.

FAA-Federal Aviation Administration

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is the national aviation authority of the United States of America. An agency of the United States Department of Transportation, it has authority to regulate and oversee all aspects of civil aviation in the U.S. The Federal Aviation Act of 1958 created the organization under the name “Federal Aviation Agency”, and adopted its current name in 1966 when it became a part of the United States Department of Transportation.

Private Pilot License in the United States (FAA)

To obtain a PPL (Private Pilot License) in the US all you need is an airplane and a certified instructor. This you can find by contacting your local flight club or a nearby flight school. If you look to obtain a PPL and fly for leisure (fun) it is seldom necessary to look far. Most cities across America with an airport have a flight club or a flight school.

Before getting the PPL you need a certain amount of training. You need a minimum of 40 hours flight time (most students have an average of 60-80 hours much depending on how often they fly) and you have to pass a written exam. Students who go with a flight club usually buy the textbooks and study on their own to pass the written exam. This is a computer based multiple-choice test of 60 questions. If you train with a flight school they may offer ground school classes that cover the theory.

While studying for the written you start flying with an instructor. He will teach you the basics needed to safely maneuver an aircraft. And after 15-20 hours of flight time you make your first solo flight.

The next 20-50 hours are dominated by dual flights with your instructor, cross country flights to learn how to properly navigate, solo training flights and solo cross country flights. When your instructor feels the necessary skill level is reached he signs you up for a “check ride”.

A “check ride” is conducted by a certified examiner and usually done in the airplane you learned how to fly. You start with an oral exam of about an hour. Here you are asked questions to test the knowledge level and you cover a pre-planned cross country flight. After passing the oral part of the “check ride” you fly.

The flying part of the PPL check ride takes from an hour to an hour and a half. Here you cover the basic maneuvers, navigation skills and take offs and landings. Often the ride is started of as a cross country flight where you fly the first check points on the cross country route before doing maneuvers and finish of with landing rounds at the airport.

After passing the check ride the examiner issue you a PPL and you are now an FAA pilot. Source

FAA Requirements To Verify the Authenticity of a Foreign License, Rating, or Medical Certification

Foreign License
If you are applying for a certificate issued on the basis of a foreign license under the provisions of:

  • 14 CFR Part 61, Section 61.75
  • special purpose pilot authorizations under Section 61.77
  • using a pilot certificate issued under Section 61.75 to apply for a commercial pilot certificate under Section 61.123 (h)
  • applying for an airline transport pilot certificate issued under Section 61.153 (d) (3)
  • applying for a certificate issued on the basis of a foreign license under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 63, Sections 63.23 and 63.42

The Airmen Certification Branch, AFS-760 must have the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) verify the validity and currency of the foreign license and medical certificate or endorsement before you apply for an FAA certificate or authorization. The processing of the Verification of Authenticity of Foreign License, Rating, and Medical Certification form takes approximately 45 to 90 days to complete. NOTE: Do not schedule any travel and/or checkrides, etc until a valid Verification Letter has been obtained from AFS-760.

Foreign applicants who require a visit to a FAA Flight Standards District Office or are applying for the issuance or replacement of an airman certificate in accordance with 14 CFR 61.75 must contact their selected Flight Standards District Office upon receipt of this verification letter to schedule an appointment with a FAA Inspector or authorized certifying official. Do not anticipate an appointment earlier than two weeks after this initial contact, due to enhanced security procedures. Source

European Flight Training

These programmes are designed to meet the requirements for a Flight Crew position with a European Airline. Upon graduation, you will be qualified with at least an EASA CPL/IR with frozen ATPL and additional qualifications both FAA & EASA, depending on which course you choose.

The 3 options below indicate exactly which licences and ratings you will obtain and confirms the cost and the number of hours flown for each.

Our EASA Fast Track Programme is highly recommended as compared to the Pure EASA option. It reduces your overall costs and we do not underestimate how important this is for many. It also gives greater flexibility during training, reduces the time taken to get qualified, and ultimately gives you a more broad experience which ultimately makes you a better more rounded pilot. Prices are based on staying in our accomadation for the course duration.
Our start dates for 2013 are as follows :

  1. 19th August 2013- 2 spaces remaining- $1,000 summer discount for this course.
  2. 14th October 2013 – 6 spaces reamining
  3. 3rd January 2014 -Please add $5,000 to the prices bellow for 2014 prices .

Contact Information
Tel : + 1 772 466 4757
Fax : + 1 772 466 4886
Skype : europeanflighttraining
info@flyeft.com
Address: 3800 St Lucie Blvd, Fort Pierce, FL, 34946, USA

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Pilot Training Step By Step Overview

Pilot Training Step By Step OverviewYou made the choice to fly for a living. You are pursuing a dream that requires much commitment and sacrifice. Apply the three C’s to your studying: Commitment, Control and Challenge. Commit to your class schedule, control your attitude during flight time and challenge your mind by everyday involvement. Time is not the only thing you need to invest. In addition to time, money is another investment students have to evaluate. The cost to attain a Pilot License can vary greatly from person to person. A minimum of 35 hours of flight time is required to receive a license (40 if flying part 61), but some students may need up to 70 hours of flight training. Flight training is expensive; invest in research of what it takes to become a pilot before your invest in flight training. Important factors to consider in your journey to become a pilot.

Decide What Type Of Pilot You Want To Be

The first step to becoming a pilot is deciding what type of flying you’ll be doing. It will dictate what type of pilot license you’ll need to earn, as well as what equipment it will have that you will need certification for.
There will be specific requirements for your pilot’s license or certificate depending upon the type of aircraft you’ll be flying. The choices range from various types and sizes of fixed wing aeroplanes to helicopters. Even if you plan to fly airships, you’ll be required to have a pilot license.

The type of flying you’re interested in doing is also a consideration that affects what training and certification be necessary. Pilot’s licenses come in several types, ranging from a student pilot all the way up to an airline pilot licensed to fly passenger jets.

There are 4 basic types of pilot’s licenses that are similar in most jurisdictions:

  • Recreational Pilot: Usually permitting the pilot to fly with friends and family aboard, and only valid for flights within the country of issuance.
  • Private Pilot’s License: Fly only with friends and family aboard, but valid all over the world.
  • Commercial Pilot’s License: Permitted to fly as a job, and valid all over the world. A commercial pilot’s license allows the holder to fly large jet aircraft as well, but not as a captain.
  • Airline Transport Pilot’s License: Permits the licensee to fly aircraft for a living anywhere in the world and includes the certification to fly jets as Captain.

Of the several levels of pilot’s licenses, the most basic is a recreational pilot license. These licenses permit the licensee to pilot an aircraft anywhere within the country of issuance. However, depending upon the jurisdiction, the pilot may or many not be permitted to carry passengers, and could be restricted to flying only when visibility permits, such as daylight hours and during clear weather. Night flying, or flying any time instruments are required usually requires different certification.

Most aviation authorities also limit recreational and private pilot licenses to single engine aircraft, with twin engines necessitating additional training and certification.

The type of aircraft a pilot is licensed to fly will usually include restrictions; For example, a private pilot license does not permit a pilot to fly helicopters or turbo-jet power planes. A pilot licensed to fly jet aircraft will also be permitted to fly single and twin engine aircraft, but likely not a helicopter. Likewise, helicopter pilots are most often certified to fly only helicopters unless they have additional certification and/or a license to fly fixed wing aircraft as well.  Source:

To take advantage of aviation’s rewards, you must make sure you get the good, solid information and aviation training that you’ll need to be a safe, confident pilot in the air. One of the most important steps in that process is finding the right flight school.

Choose The Right Flight Training School

Enrollment in an FAA-approved school usually ensures a high quality of training. FAA-approved schools meet prescribed standards with respect to equipment, facilities, personnel, and curricula. However, many excellent pilot schools find it impractical to qualify for the FAA certification, and are referred to as non-approved schools.
When you begin your flight school selection process, you must first understand the terms used in describing flight schools and their level of certification. The most basic level of flight training facility operates under Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) Part 61. The regulation identifies the minimum certification requirements for all pilot and flight instructors. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has no direct oversight as to the day-to-day operations of flight schools operating under FAR Part 61.

One of the differences between FAA-approved schools and non-approved schools is that fewer flight hours are required to qualify for a pilot certificate in an FAA-approved school. The requirement for a private pilot certificate is 40 hours in a non-approved school, and 35 hours in an approved school. However, since most people require 60 to 75 hours of training, this difference may be insignificant for a private pilot certificate.

Flight schools come in two flavors, Part 61 and Part 141, which refer to the parts of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) under which they operate. The most common and least important distinction between them is the minimum flight time required for the private certificate — 40 hours under Part 61, and 35 hours under Part 141.
The FAR Part 141 flight training facility differs from their Part 61 counterpart by the level of FAA participation. All FAR Part 141 schools must undergo a lengthy and very thorough evaluation by the FAA prior to conducting training. They must have in place a management structure that meets the minimum experience requirements as outlined in FAR Part 141. The FAR Part 141 course curriculum has a minimum standard outlined in the appendix section of FAR Part 141 and must obtain FAA approval prior to conducting training. Due to this increased FAA participation , FAR Part 141 training facilities are able to offer the same certification courses as FAR Part 61 facilities , but with reduced minimum requirements. The pilot applicants are held to the same standards as outlined in the appropriate PTS.

Flight School Location

Depending on your flight training needs, the location of the flight school may play a large role in the quality of the course. Florida is a great place for flight training as the weather stays warm throughout the year. If you select a training facility in a region that often experiences poor weather conditions such as rain , fog , thunderstorms , and strong winds , your number of flights may be reduced.

Quality Over Quantity

When it comes to flight training, it is the quality of the Flight Instructor that has the biggest impact. A good Flight Instructor is able to adapt the learning process to each student in the way the student needs to learn, and not every student learns the same way. Since most Flight Instructors will be communicating verbally to the student pilot, communication skills are a very important. If you are looking for a flight school, be sure to meet and talk to the Flight Instructor who will be teaching you. You will want to be certain that you and your Flight Instructor have a clear line of communication. Like many industries that need instructors, there are good Flight Instructors and there are bad Flight Instructors. What works for one student may not work for someone else, but a good Flight Instructor will know how to adapt. The quality you receive means less quantity of lessons required. So the takeaway here: always meet your Flight Instructor. Source:

Why Choose Aviator Flight School for your Pilot Training
  • Licensed by the State of Florida Commission For Independent Education License #4155
  • Aviator Flight Training Academy is a Division of Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology, which is licensed by the State of Florida Commission for Independent Education and Accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges.
  • 27 Years in the Flight Training Industry
  • To date, Aviator has trained over 5000 pilots for the commercial airline industry
  • Only School Offering 200 Hours of Multi-Engine Time
  • Aviator is the only flight school that has a full 200 hours of multi-engine time included in our program
  • No Flight Training Devices (Simulators)
  • FTDs are not used towards your flight time for any ratings
  • Approved by the Federal Department of Education to offer Title IV Loans
  • Aviator has the ability to offer students federal funding on approved accredited programs
  • Job Placement Assistance with Regional Airlines
  • Aviator offers job placement assistance for our graduates
  •  “A” Rating with United States Better Business Bureau
  • Classroom Environment – All classes taught in our educational center, NOT online

CONTACT AVIATOR
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ONLINE ENROLLMENT

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Don’t Just Dream About Being A Pilot, Be A Pilot

Don’t Just Dream About Being A Pilot, Be A PilotAirline jobs are not going away, the demand is beginning to increase. For many current airline pilots, the mandatory retirement age is approaching! If you are a high school student and in college and wish to learn more about what it takes to become a pilot, this blog outlines the steps you need to approach your dream.

Although there are no age restrictions to take flying lessons, you should know that the minimum age to get your Private Pilot’s Licence (the first licence) is 17 years old. This allows you to take flight lessons and be able to get your Private Pilot’s Licence before you graduate from high school.

The senior year of high school is an exciting time. You and all of your friends are endlessly talking about where to go to university, what to study, and what to do with your life. A career is a pilot is one of the most rewarding and exciting careers. If you love flying, it is one of those jobs that you could wake up each and everyday excited to go to work. Isn’t doing what you love and being paid to do it the dream of all high school students?

Go on a test flight

There are a few things you should do first when you are considering to be a pilot. First, get as much information as you can about the career such as education, career paths, and salary expectations. The next thing is to contact your local flight schools and book a FAM-Flight. A FAM-Flight is a familiarity flight. It is a heavily discounted test flight offered at most flight schools. The beauty of these test flights are that you get a taste of the real thing. You fly an airplane with the instructor and are allowed to touch as many controls as you are comfortable with. This is also a good opportunity to ask the instructors any questions you may have about a pilot’s career. If you feel like you enjoy flying, sign up for lessons and get your Private Pilot’s Licence as fast as you can.

Flight School

You should also be aware that a post secondary education is not a requirement to be a professional pilot. This may be a heavy factor on whether you should pursue a pilot’s career right after graduating high school. At flight school, you learn how to fly and you receive your licence. Formal post-secondary schooling is not part of the program.
You should talk to your parents if you should dive straight into pilot school after high school. Your parents may encourage you to go and get your degree first. Although a degree is not a requirement, it is very advantageous. As you grow as a professional pilot and advance your career, major airlines give preference to people with a post-secondary education.

Pilot Training at a College Degree Program

There are many school programs that also offer aviation post-secondary programs. These could be for a degree or a diploma, depending on the school. These programs offer students flight schooling as well as diploma/degree. Most likely, you will graduate with a Commercial Pilot’s Licence (the licence after the Private Pilot’s Licence) and the necessary ratings, and a diploma or a degree. You will find that getting your pilot’s licence from these college programs will help you find a job much easier in the beginning and later stages of your career.
The downside to studying at a college program is that it is nearly 2x more expensive than if you were to study from a traditional flight school. Traditional flight schools will cost about $35,000-$40,000 and college programs will cost about $65,000-$75,000. The decision on whether you should study at a college program or traditional flight school should be made according to your goals as a pilot.

As you can see, there are many factors to consider when deciding to be a pilot. Just remember that if you are passionate about flying, there is no better career for you than a pilot. Source Mark Bascug– retired pilot.

Flight Training School in Florida

Not all flight training schools are the same. There are over 1400 of them in this country so there is a big selection out there and finding the right flight training school can be difficult. There are many reasons to choose Aviator College in Ft. Pierce, Florida. Here are some reasons why you should select this flight training school.

Location is very important when you are looking for a flight training school. Florida is a great place to earn your wings. The moderate and mild climate makes flight training a pleasure. The good weather allows you to log more flying hours faster, get your degree quicker and be on the way sooner to your new aviation career. Ft. Pierce is a small city with friendly people – without congested traffic on the ground or in the air.

Aviator College – situated in the beautiful city of Ft. Pierce, Florida, is the perfect place to embark on your flight training career. It is a fully accredited flight school with state-of-the-art facilities and a modern fleet and equipment. Once you tour our facility, you will see for yourself that not all flight training schools are the same – Aviator College is one of the best flight training schools in the country.

Aviator College Flight Training Degree Program

Jump Start Your Career With Flight Training and an A.S. Degree from Aviator College 565 Flight Hours
Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology provides the most cost effective airline pilot flight training programs and a two year Aviation degree in Aeronautical Science. The College has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator). College student’s receive a minimum of 565 flight training hours in the aviation degree program. Graduates will have the opportunity to stay on as a flight training instructor.

Non Degree Flight Training At Aviator College

Pilot Training Program With Aviator Flight Training Academy 259 Flight Hours
Aviator Flight Training Academy offers professional pilot training programs with a minimum of 200 hours of multi-engine time. The flight school has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator), large classrooms and individual briefing rooms.

CONTACT AVIATOR
SCHEDULE A VISIT
ONLINE ENROLLMENT

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Career Options For Aviation Degree Graduates

Career Options For Aviation Degree GraduatesEarning an aviation degree gives you the skill and experiences necessary to achieve success in the aviation industry. Few of the major airlines require a college degree for employment, but in the past several years, more than 95 percent of the pilots hired have at least a four-year college degree. If you want an airline job, you stand a better chance if you are among the 95 percent with a degree than the 5 percent without one. The airlines’ preference for college-educated pilots is only natural because colleges and universities have tailored their academic and flight programs to meet the industry’s specific needs. They understand that while good stick-and-rudder skills are important, it takes more then knowing how to fly to be an aviation professional.

What College Teaches

Professional pilots today are “flight managers” who must intimately understand the workings of their computerized and fly-by-wire stick and rudder, and who must work with and depend on a crew of professionals that goes far beyond those in the cockpit.

These are the essential skills students learn and practice in today’s collegiate aviation programs, but the value of a college education goes beyond these aviation-specific skills. Typically, your first two years of college will be devoted to “general education” classes. While they seemingly have no direct correlation with aviation, they do, and additionally, they’ll make you a well-rounded individual.

Math, physics, and computer-science classes help you understand your career’s technical aspects. English makes you a better oral and written communicator. Sociology and psychology give you a better understanding of human nature. History and the humanities give you insight and appreciation for man’s development, achievements, and blunders. Economics makes clear the forces that will act upon your career.

When people think of aviation, they naturally think of pilots. But pilots are just one cog in the vast human machine that makes aviation work. If it were not for aeronautical and electrical engineers, airframe and powerplant (A&P) and avionics technicians, meteorologists, air traffic controllers, aviation managers at all levels, and a host of others, we wouldn’t need pilots (and the others wouldn’t be needed if there were no pilots). These are all viable, rewarding aviation careers, careers for which you can become educated at many colleges and universities.

Those aiming for the cockpit should never forget that a failed medical (or a failed airline) can terminate a flying career without notice. This is another reason pilots should know more than just how to fly. If you don’t have a degree, your career options are limited. But if you’ve been educated as a manager, engineer, or technician, you have career alternatives that will enable you to survive professionally and, perhaps, maintain your aviation “connection.” Source

The aviation industry offers career opportunities to suit many interests and backgrounds. The aviation industry is not limited to pilots, flight attendants, ticket agents, airport administrators, astronomy, and other related careers. This industry encompasses a variety of careers such as science, engineering, mathematics, medicine, business, law, technology, communications, and many more.

Some aviation careers require a college degree while others may require a high school diploma, a solid background in math and science or some years of technical training either on the job or through technical schools.

Pilot Careers
  • Flight Instructors
  • Regional Airline Pilots
  • Military Pilots
  • Major/National Airline Pilots
Aircraft and Systems Maintenance
  • Airframe Mechanic
  • Powerplant Mechanics
  • Airframe & Powerplant Mechanics
  • Avionics/Electronics Technicians
Aircraft Manufacturing
  • Manufacturing Engineers
  • Electrical Installers & Technicians
  • Tool, Jig & Fixture Makers
  • Quality Technicians
Airline and Airport Operations
  • Airport & FBO Managers
  • Fire and Crash Rescue
  • Ramp Service Personnel
  • Air Traffic Controllers
Get Started On The Aviation Degree For The Aviation Career You Want

Whether you want to run the day-to-day operations of an airport, work toward becoming an aviation executive, or become an airline, corporate or military pilot, an aviation degree offers a good start to your career.

Aviator College Associate’s Degree Program

The Aeronautical Science Program prepares the graduate for a career in the aviation industry by providing a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, aeronautical sciences, aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry. The graduate will receive an Associate of Science Degree from Aviator College with flight ratings from private pilot through commercial, with Flight Instructor ratings. This training is necessary to obtain employment, and by completing the associate’s degree you will set yourself apart from other applicants since a degree is preferred in the airline industry.

The flight portion of the program consists of 565 flight hours and more multi-engine time than any other college or flight school today. NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time requirements. Our large multi-engine fleet is equipped with Garmin 430s, and ASPEN EFIS is being introduced. Our single engine fleet consists of Piper Warrior III with all glass (EFIS systems). Ground school is taught in a classroom environment.

The school’s 37,000 sq. ft. Administration & Academic training facility is open from 7 am to 6 pm daily. The Flight Operations building is open 24/7 daily, rain or shine.

Contact Aviator
Online Enrollment

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Pilot Shortage Is Your Opportunity, Start Your Flight Training Today

Pilot Shortage Is Your Opportunity, Start Your Flight Training TodayThe bigger threat is an approaching worldwide shortage of future pilots to fly these machines – emphasis on a “worldwide” issue vs. a U.S. issue, because much of the growth in aviation is occurring outside the United States. Boeing and Airbus both have seen it coming for years and predicted that there will be a need for as many as a half million (yes, that many) new airline pilots over the next two decades – around the world, especially in the Asia Pacific region and India.

Piper Training Fleets to the Rescue

Coupled with an aging fleet of training aircraft and even older shrinking corps of pilot baby boomers, the potential threat to aviation of all types becomes alarming. Fortunately, one of the manufacturers of training aircraft saw this coming about 18 months ago and re-calibrated the company to meet an anticipated increased demand for pilot trainers.

In my consulting work for Piper Aircraft, headquartered in Vero Beach, Fla., I am pleased to say that the company’s foresight is paying off. The company’s airplanes are destined to train pilots around the world in response to the intense need for future aviators.

Earlier this month, Piper announced two major fleet deals destined to train pilots in the United States and abroad for future jobs around the world.

CAE Oxford Training Academy, one of the world’s leading pilot educators, trains pilots globally and is active in the Asia Pacific region, including China. It placed an initial order for 35 aircraft, part of a five-year fleet replenishment initiative agreement with Piper. Under the agreement, CAE, based in Canada, has designated Piper as its Preferred Aircraft Provider. CAE’s long-term needs include modernizing its large fleet. Piper expects these future pilot training airplanes to go to CAE training academies around the world. CAE already trains pilots in Europe, Africa, India, Hong Kong, Australia and the U.S.

Piper offers both single-engine and twin-engine training airplanes, which is important to the learning process for new pilots as they progress to more sophisticated flying tasks. And, of course, these training airplanes can have the very latest in cockpit avionics and navigation equipment so the new pilots and their future passengers have the benefit of state-of-the-art safety technology.

For each one of us who uses business aviation, or the scheduled airlines, on a regular basis, having a well-trained cadre in the cockpit is a prerequisite for getting on the plane in the first place. These training airplanes will train airline pilots and other aviators that will find their way to the cockpits of business aircraft around the globe.
I’m glad Piper is stepping up to the plate. Source Jim Gregory BusinessAviation

Aviator College welcomes it’s new fleet of Piper Warrior III airplanes equipped with Avadyne EFIS Systems.

Aviator Flight Training Academy offers professional pilot training programs with a minimum of 200 hours of multi-engine time. The flight school has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator), large classrooms and individual briefing rooms.

Professional Pilot Program & Commercial Pilot Program At Aviator Flight Training Academy

The programs at Aviator Flight School Academy are designed to provide what the airline industry demands of future commercial pilots. The training you will receive at Aviator is one of the most intensive and challenging programs offered in aviation flight training today.

During your flight training you will fly a total of 259 hours, of which 200 hours will be in a multi-engine aircraft. No flight simulators are used for total flight time. The ground school portion is in a structured classroom environment.

You will receive a minimum of 643 instructional hours for the Professional Pilot Program. 484 instructional hours for the Commercial Pilot Program. The instructional hours includes all ground and flight training. 6 months of housing is included in the program. If you come with a PPL 5 months will be included. Commercial Pilot program includes 4 months of housing, if you come with a PPL 3 months will be included.

Please provide two weeks advance notice before arrival so that we may reserve your accommodations. A deposit of $ 500.00 is required and should be submitted with the enrollment form. $ 150.00 Is a non refundable deposit, and $ 350.00 will be applied to your student account. Payments will be made in three equal installments according to the contract.

The school’s 37,000 sq. ft. Administration & Academic training facility is open from 7 am to 6 pm daily. The Flight Operations building is open 24/7 daily, rain or shine.

* With the increase in airline hiring we are now including the CRJ Jet Transition with the Professional Pilot Program and the Commercial Pilot Program.

Select the tabs below to choose aircraft you want to do the Instrument Rating in.
Instrument in Multi Engine
Instrument in Single Engine

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Get Paid To Fly With Commercial Pilot License

Get Paid To Fly With Commercial Pilot LicenseThe only way you can make flying as living is by obtaining a commercial pilot license (CPL). CPL gives you the privileges of flying for compensation or hire. Before you start training for the CPL you need to hold at least a private pilot license (PPL) and an instrument rating (IR) is advised.

Commercial Pilot License Basic Requirements

Here are just a few of the basic requirements for the Commercial License.

  • You must be able to read, speak, write, and understand the English Language
  • You must be able to obtain a 2nd class medical certificate
  • You must be 18 years of age
  • You must hold at least a private pilot license
  • You must have received and logged the appropriate ground and flight training for the Commercial License
  • You must have 250 hours total flight time
  • You must have 100 hours flight time as pilot in command
  • You must have 50 hours of cross country flight time as pilot in command
  • You must pass the FAA Commercial Pilot written exam
  • You must pass the Commercial Pilot Oral and Practical Exam
CPL Benefits

Below is an outline of some of the benefits you will enjoying by having CPL in your name:

  • You can be paid for your flying time. On top of being paid for your flying time, you will not be paying for the airplane, but will be logging time in your logbook.
  • The skills you learn while pursuing your commercial pilot license will enhance your safety as a pilot.
  • You will be able to control airplanes with greater skill and accuracy.
  • You will be able to perform more advanced maneuvers and emergency procedures with greater confidence.
  • The skills you learn will prepare you to carry passengers with more comfort and ease, which is to their liking.
  • You will increase your knowlegde and understanding of aircraft systems.
  • You will become endorsed to operate complex airplanes. (A high-performance endorsement may also be included depending on the type of airplane you train in.)
  • You will learn many of the regulations and requirements about flight for hire, which will keep you flying legally and in good standing with the FAA.
  • You may enjoy a decrease in your insurance rates if you own your own airplane.
  • You will be able to offer your services to provide scenic flights, photography flights, ferry flights, and crop dusting to paying customers. You can also work for a skydive operation with nothing more than a commercial pilot license.
  • Training for a commercial pilot license is not only very beneficial to your career and goals, but is an incredibly fun license to work towards!
  • Even for those not planning on a career in aviation, holding a commercial pilot license looks very good on resumes.
Steps to Getting a Commercial Pilot License

The steps below provide a agenda for getting your commercial pilot license:

  • Research and choose a flight school
  • Attain your private pilot license
  • Attain your instrument rating (see instrument rating requirements)
  • Take classes on the ground to cover aeronautical knowledge
  • Take and pass the written exam on aeronautical knowledge
  • Log 250 hours of flight time for airplanes or 150 hours for helicopters
  • Pass a practical test
Commercial Pilot License Training

Here are the things you will train for when you go through a commercial pilot license training program.

For an airplane category rating with a single-engine class rating
  • Preflight preparation;
  • Preflight procedures;
  • Airport and seaplane base operations;
  • Takeoffs, landings, and go-arounds;
  • Performance maneuvers;
  • Ground reference maneuvers;
  • Navigation;
  • Slow flight and stalls;
  • Emergency operations;
  • High-altitude operations;
  • Postflight procedures
For an airplane category rating with a multi-engine class rating
  • Preflight preparation;
  • Preflight procedures;
  • Airport and seaplane base operations;
  • Takeoffs, landings, and go-arounds;
  • Performance maneuvers;
  • Navigation;
  • Slow flight and stalls;
  • Emergency operations;
  • Multiengine operations;
  • High-altitude operations;
  • Postflight procedures
Commercial Pilot License Cost

Most flight schools will quote you a cost associated with a certain flight package. There are some variables with how you can go about getting your training for a commercial license. Depending on how you choose to train, the final price of a commercial license will vary. The costs of flight and ground instruction, checkride fees, books, test prep, and airplane rentals to receive the required instruction, can be estimated at approximately $6,500.

One of the ways you can moderate the cost of getting your commercial pilot license is to take an accelerated flight training program. This is essentially going to flight school full time to get in the required number of hours of class and flight time needed to attain your license. Source

Commercial Pilot License FAQ

Does having my commercial pilot license mean I am able to fly jets?
Not exactly. A commercial pilot license allows you to fly for hire. There is no way to get a job flying jets or any of the airliners without having obtained a commercial pilot license. Just having the commercial license does not mean you can instantly get in the cockpit of a 737. Additional training and experience is required above just having a commercial license. However, there is no possibility of being hired for a flying job without a commercial pilot license on your resume. It is a legal requirement set forth by the FAA.

Do I have to have my instrument rating to be able to get my commercial pilot license?
No. You can take the test for becoming a commercial pilot without having already obtained your instrument rating. However, the commercial pilot license will have some restrictions on it. Since there is a requirement to log 250 hours of total time before you can test for your commercial license, most people work on their instrument rating while they are accumulating those hours in their logbook. This method makes the most sense financially for most people. However, it is not required to have your instrument rating before testing for your commercial pilot license.

What is the best way to build the 50 hours of required cross-country time that I need for a commercial pilot license?
There are many different ways to go about building your cross country time. If you are on a set budget, I recommend coming up with a plan before you get too far into your cross country time. This plan really should be formed before you start working on your instrument time since you need 50 hours of cross country time for your instrument rating.
Will we do very much instrument work while I work on my commercial license?
For a single-engine commercial pilot license, there is no instrument requirement to meet. If you are planning on adding on a multi-engine commercial license, you can plan on doing some instrument work during the multi-engine training.

Can I fly multi-engine airplanes after I get my commercial pilot license?
Having the privilege to fly a multi-engine airplane means that you need to have training specific to multi-engine airplanes. If you already have a single-engine commercial pilot license, it is just some additional training to add on a multi-engine license. It may be possible to take your single and multi-engine commercial pilot test in the same day!

I’m not planning on flying for a career. Is there any benefit to me if I get my commercial pilot license?
Definitely! Training for a commercial pilot license will increase your ability to control the airplane in everyday flying conditions, emergency situations, and more advanced flying scenarios such as short field and soft field operations. Part of obtaining your commercial pilot license involves becoming endorsed for complex airplanes, which offers a fun, and new challenge for many people. If you own your own airplane, you may be able to benefit from reduced insurance premiums. On top of all of that, a commercial pilot license looks great on a resume and can give you a very competitive edge in interviews and the workplace. Having the confidence that comes from receiving additional training will be something you and your passengers appreciate. Source

Aviator Flight School Pro Pilot Programs

The programs at Aviator Flight School Academy are designed to provide what the airline industry demands of future commercial pilots. The training you will receive at Aviator is one of the most intensive and challenging programs offered in aviation flight training today.

During your flight training you will fly a total of 259 hours, of which 200 hours will be in a multi-engine aircraft. No flight simulators are used for total flight time. The ground school portion is in a structured classroom environment.

You will receive a minimum of 643 instructional hours for the Professional Pilot Program. 484 instructional hours for the Commercial Pilot Program. The instructional hours includes all ground and flight training. 6 months of housing is included in the program. If you come with a PPL 5 months will be included. Commercial Pilot program includes 4 months of housing, if you come with a PPL 3 months will be included.

Contact Aviator
Commerical Special

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