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Archive for August, 2012

FAA News and Rising Demand for Airline Pilots

FAA News and Rising Demand for Airline PilotsWASHINGTON – An industry forecast that nearly half a million new airline pilots will be needed worldwide over the next 20 years as airlines expand their fleets has raised safety concerns that airlines will hire lower caliber pilots as they struggle to fill slots.

Boeing, one of the world’s largest makers of commercial jetliners, forecasts about 460,000 new pilots will be needed worldwide between now and 2031 as global economies expand and airlines take deliveries of tens of thousands of new commercial jetliners. The forecast includes 69,000 new pilots in the North America, mostly in the U.S. The greatest growth will be in the Asia-Pacific region, where an estimated 185,600 new pilots will be needed.
Likewise, Boeing predicts 601,000 new aircraft maintenance technicians will be needed over the same period, with greatest demand — 243,500 technicians — in the Asia-Pacific region. An estimated 92,500 new technicians will North America.

FAA Industry News

Industry and government officials anticipate a wave of pilot retirements at U.S. airlines beginning this year. Five years ago, the FAA raised the mandatory retirement age for pilots from 60 to 65. The fifth anniversary of that decision is Dec. 13. Pilots who were age 60 on that date five years ago are reaching the age where they have to retire.

Also, FAA regulations created in response to an aviation safety law passed by Congress two years ago will raise the experience threshold required to be an airline first officer from the current 250 hours of flying time to 1,500 hours, the same level as required of captains. That’s expected to make it harder for airlines to find qualified new applicants.

FAA Announces Plans for Industry Working Group to Study Portable Electronics Usage

WASHINGTON – Given the widespread consumer use of portable electronic devices (PEDs), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is forming a government-industry group to study the current PED policies and procedures aircraft operators use to determine when these devices can be used safely during flight. Current FAA regulations require an aircraft operator to determine that radio frequency interference from PEDs are not a flight safety risk before the operator authorizes them for use during certain phases of flight.

“With so many different types of devices available, we recognize that this is an issue of consumer interest,” said Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. “Safety is our highest priority, and we must set appropriate standards as we help the industry consider when passengers can use the latest technologies safely during a flight.”

Opportunities For Flight Training Students

The current recession has created fierce competition for jobs in all industries. Now is the perfect opportunity for you to start your flight training in an industry that has tremendous potential!

  • The demand is beginning to increase. For many current airline pilots, the mandatory retirement age is approaching!
  • The FAA is now taking a more serious look at airline pilot flight training. This is forcing the airline industry to take a harder look at candidates for pilot replacements!
  • Professional Pilots must now have first-rate knowledge and continually upgraded skills to have the cutting edge
  • Professionalism and knowledge are now prerequisites for entrance into the worldwide airline industry.
  • Fast paced, “fast track” programs, or self-study courses will not meet the new airline industry standards.
Flight School and Flight Training Programs

For more than 27 years Aviator has been the leader in multi-engine flight training. We have provided over 5000 professional pilots to the airline industry, both nationally and worldwide, through our Professional Pilot Flight Training Programs. Our FAA-certified Part 141 approved flight programs provide students with the skills and experience demanded by today’s commercial aviation industry. Aviator is accredited by the ACCSC (Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges).

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Schools and Colleges With Approved Yellow Ribbon Program

Schools and Colleges With Approved Yellow Ribbon ProgramThe Post-9/11 GI Bill  provides financial support for education and housing to individuals with at least 90 days of aggregate service after September 10, 2001, or individuals discharged with a service-connected disability after 30 days. You must have received an honorable discharge to be eligible for the Post-9/11 GI Bill.

Benefits of the Yellow Ribbon Program

The Post-9/11 GI Bill will pay you:

  • all resident tuition & fees for a public school
  • the higher of the actual tuition & fees or the national maximum per academic year for a private school

NOTE: an exception to this exists for students enrolled in private schools in AZ, MI, NH, NY, PA, SC or TX. In these cases we will pay the higher of the actual tuition & fees or the highest public in-state undergraduate tuition & fees
Your actual tuition & fees costs may exceed these amounts if you are attending a private school or are attending a public school as a nonresident student.

Institutions of Higher Learning (Degree Granting Institutions) may elect to participate in the Yellow Ribbon Program to make additional funds available for your education program without an additional charge to your GI Bill entitlement.

Institutions that voluntarily enter into a Yellow Ribbon Agreement with VA choose the amount of tuition and fees that will be contributed. VA will match that amount and issue payment directly to the institution.

Eligibility

Only veterans entitled to the maximum benefit rate (based on service requirements) or their designated transferees may receive this funding. Active duty service members and their spouses are not eligible for this program (child transferees of active duty service members may be eligible if the service member is qualified at the 100% rate).

Therefore, you may be eligible if:

  • You served an aggregate period of active duty after September 10, 2001, of at least 36 months;
  • You were honorably discharged from active duty for a service connected disability and you served 30 continuous days after September 10, 2001;
  • You are a dependent eligible for Transfer of Entitlement under the Post-9/11 GI Bill based on a veteran’s service under the eligibility criteria listed above.
Payment Amounts For Flight Training

While the participation requirements are the same for all GI Bill programs, the payment amount varies depending on the GI Bill program you are utilizing, and the type of Flight School you are attending. (Payments are issued after the training is completed and the school submits the information to the VA.)

Under the Post-9/11 GI Bill
  • If you are enrolled in any degree program that consists of flight training at a public Institution of Higher Learning you can be reimbursed up to the resident in-state cost of the training and will be eligible to receive your housing allowance and the books & supplies stipend.
  • If you are enrolled in any degree program that consists of flight training at a private Institution of Higher Learning you can be reimbursed up to the full cost of the training or the national maximum per academic year, whichever is less. You will also be eligible to receive your housing allowance and the books & supplies stipend.
  • If you are enrolled in any type of vocational flight training you can be reimbursed up to the full cost of training or $10,000 per academic year, whichever is less, you WILL NOT receive the housing allowance or books & supplies stipend.

The Yellow Ribbon Program may apply for those enrolled in degree programs. An academic year lasts from August 1 to July 31.

How will I Know My School is Participating in the Yellow Ribbon Program?

You must be enrolled in an approved program offered by an IHL.
Search for Yellow Ribbon Program participating institutions for the 2012 – 2013 school year

Aviator College is a Participant in the Yellow Ribbon Program

Approved for Chapter 33 (Post 9/11) Benefits & Chapter 30 (Montgomery Bill)

Aviator College is approved by the Veteran’s Administration under the GI Bills for both academic tuition and flight training fees.

Prospective student who performed active duty after September 10, 2001 have additional eligibility for funding. Read about the new VA benefit in a letter from the Director of VA Education Services

Due to complexity and paperwork required please contact Amy Roth, or call her at 772-466-4822, if you would like more information on the VA Pro Program.

VA Students enrolling will need to register in the VA website  Fill out form VONAPP. If you have used your VA benefits before or prior you will also have to fill out the form 22-1995 Also you will need to bring a copy DD2-14.

All pilots must now present a valid passport or birth certificate upon arrival. For any additional information please contact our Financial Aid Department.

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3 Pilot Tests To Become a Pilot

3 Pilot Tests To Become a PilotThere are many different kinds of pilots. After all, millions of Americans have learned how to fly. Some fly just for fun. Some fly as a way to travel to their jobs. And some are career pilots who fly professionally to earn a living.

Types of pilots in successive order of qualifications:

  • Student Pilot
  • Sport Pilot
  • Recreational Pilot
  • Private Pilot
  • Instrument rating
  • Commercial Pilot
  • Certificated Flight Instructor
  • Airline Transport Pilot (ATP)
  • Designated Pilot Examiner

Whether you’re pursuing a sport, recreational, or private pilot certificate, you’ll need to pass three tests: the pre-solo written test, FAA knowledge test, and FAA practical test.

1. Pre-Solo Written Test
  • Required before your first solo flight
  • May be written by your flight school, instructor, a commercial vendor, or anyone else as long as it meets FAA requirements
  • Questions may be any format (multiple-choice, fill-in-the blank, essay, etc.)
  • May be any number of questions
  • May be open- or closed-book
  • Must be corrected to 100%
  • Must include at least the following topics:
  • Applicable regulations from parts 61 and 91
  • Airspace rules and procedures for the airport where the solo flight will be performed
  • Flight characteristics and operational limitations for the make and model of aircraft to be flown
2. FAA Knowledge Test
  • Often called “the written”
  • Questions are pulled from an FAA database
  • Test is taken on a computer with supplementary information available on paper
  • Questions are multiple-choice
  • Minimum passing score: 70%
  • Instructor’s endorsement is required to take the test
  • Two vendors offer FAA approved testing: CATS and LaserGrade
  • Cost = $150
  • Number of questions and time limit depend on pilot certificate sought:
  • Sport: 40 questions, 2 hours
  • Recreational: 50 questions, 2 hours
  • Private: 60 questions, 2 hours 30 minutes
3. FAA Practical Test
  • Often called a “checkride”
  • Administered by an FAA inspector, designated pilot examiner (DPE), or sport pilot examiner
  • Content and conduct of the test is strictly governed by the applicable FAA Practical Test Standards
  • Test is pass/fail (fail one item, fail the test)
  • Instructor’s endorsement is required to take the test
  • Cost: free if administered by an FAA inspector, otherwise normally a fee applies (set by the examiner)
  • Divided into two parts: The oral portion tests the applicant’s knowledge and The flight portion continues to test the applicant’s knowledge and also evaluates flying skills
Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology

The mission of Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology is to provide practical and educational opportunities that emphasize the skills, knowledge, and experience necessary for a fulfilling career in aviation throughout a lifetime of technological and social change.

Our Aeronautical Science Program includes 565 flight hours and more multi-engine time than any other college or flight school. NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time requirements. Our large multi-engine fleet is equipped with Garmin 430s, and ASPEN EFIS is being introduced.

Contact Aviator
Schedule a Visit
Online Enrollment

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What To Consider Before Beginning Your Flight Training

What To Consider Before Beginning Your Flight TrainingWhile FAA sets minimum certification requirements for air carriers (commercial certificate with instrument rating), each airline sets its own minimum experience requirements. For example, FAA requires 250 total hours for a commercial pilot certificate. However, few, if any, airlines use that amount of flight time as their own minimum standard. They may require 1,000 or 2,000 hours or more. Also, market conditions (supply of pilots and demand for air travel) influence what minimum experience airlines require.

Also, different air carriers may consider some types of flight time more important than others. Some prefer more jet or turbine experience, while some may prefer more time in a particular type of aircraft. Many airlines also consider whether the applicant has a college degree.

There are aviation job-search companies that research hiring requirements and trends of all U.S. air carriers. You can find these companies through an internet search and through advertisements in flying magazines.

You can get information about FAA Requirements for all pilot certificates (14 CFR Part 61) on the Government Printing Office’s Electronic Code of Federal Regulations. Be sure to select Part 61.

If you are thinking about aviation career and want to become a pilot, here are 5 considerations you should make, posted by av8er.

  1. Motivation – What do I need to learn how to fly for; pleasure, business or as a career?
  2. Location -Where should I go get my flight training done?
  3. Source – What type of flight training provider would be best for me?
  4. Scheduling – Full time, part time, formal or informal, what type of scheduling would work the best for me?
  5. Financial – How am I going to pay for my training? Would I need financial aid, student loan, personal loan, or some other type of financial assistance?

The reason you should ask these questions to yourself is because it helps you chose the right program, and also helps you understand the budgets and time / effort commitment required.

If you want to learn how to fly for pleasure, you are looking at about a total of 60-70 hours of flight training time, and about 40-50 hours of ground studies, and to get the best bang for the buck, you should expect about 10-12 hours of training time per week. If it is for pleasure, then you really can simply take the training at your own convenience, or go to one of those vacation / accelerated training places with or without your family. Cost of the training will depend on many variables, like when, where and which aircraft. But for most people, you are looking at about $6000 to $10,000 price range. Of course, there are ways to make it cheaper as well as luxurious and high end as well.

For business reasons, the basic training as above is still required, but what changes is the motivating factor, and possibly some tax advantages, both for training and then actually renting / owning an aircraft and the related cost factors (operating expenses).

Where to get your flight training? Options could be: a local flight training school, a flying club, an independent flight instructor (or CFI as we call them), a pilot flight instructor friend, a vacation / accelerated flight training gig, formal accredited flight training institutes, military academies, aviation college or university program, and so on.

Flight Training Schools

Not all flight training schools are the same. There are over 1400 of them in this country so there is a big selection out there and finding the right flight training school can be difficult.

Aviator College in Ft. Pierce, Florida

For more than 27 years Aviator has been the leader in multi-engine flight training. We have provided over 5000 professional pilots to the airline industry, both nationally and worldwide, through our Professional Pilot Flight Training Programs. Our FAA-certified Part 141 approved flight programs provide students with the skills and experience demanded by today’s commercial aviation industry. Aviator is accredited by the ACCSC (Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges).

We invite you to schedule a visit or and see the Aviator difference!

CONTACT US
ONLINE ENROLLMENT

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Landing A Pilot Job

Landing A Pilot JobJust a few years ago, the aviation industry was going through a very difficult time. Recent reports, however, indicate that the airline industry today is positioned for a big turnaround. The Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA) estimates that global aviation traffic will triple between now and 2035.

Some airlines are already beginning to see big profits. Those that are not are expanding their workforces in preparation for big years to come.

With the airline industry back on the upswing, finding a job within the industry has become mush easier than it was in the past. Couple the airline economic recovery with new internet technologies and some might say finding a job in the aviation industry today is easier than it has ever been. No matter what position within the industry you seek, you are certain to find a job listing on the Internet if you know where to look.

Aviation job boards have become commonplace on the Internet. In fact, using an online aviation job board is probably the quickest way to find any position within the aviation industry. An aviation job board (sometimes called an aviation job listing service) provides its members with a list of all types of aviation industry jobs. Mechanics, baggage handlers, reservation agents, customer service agents, flight attendants, and, of course, pilots can all find listings pertaining to their fields of expertise.

To apply for jobs posted on a listing service, members can usually click on a link and automatically send their resumes to the company looking for a new hire. Resumes are stored in the job board’s database so that applying for a job takes only seconds. Many aviation job listing services will even keep track of the jobs their members apply for. This helps their members avoid accidentally applying for the same job multiple times.

Other Ways Online Job Boards Help Employees Find Work

By storing employee resumes, job boards can also furnish employers with potential hires whenever they are performing job searches. If, for example, a company is looking for pilots with 10 years of 747 experience, a job board can filter its resumes and present the employer with a list of qualified candidates. An employer might be able to make an offer to a job candidate without that candidate ever directly applying for a job.

Improving Your Odds

Experienced aviation industry professionals should find at least one job board to check frequently when looking for work. A subscription to two or more job boards will increase the number of potential job opportunities somewhat, but there will undoubtedly be some redundancy from one job board to the next. To truly increase the odds of landing a good aviation industry job, a job seeker must check a job board and post his or her resume with a listing service that sends out resumes to companies looking to hire employees without going through the traditional job posting process.

College Degree From Aviation Training School

One final note–individuals who do not have a college degree and have limited job experience may need to attend an aviation training school before they can land a premiere aviation industry job. Training schools not only prepare their students for the business, they also assist their students with job searches after graduation. As is the case with aviation job boards, aviation industry training schools can be easily found by looking online.

Aviation College Degree Programs at Aviator College

Aviator Aeronautical Science Program includes 565 flight hours and more multi-engine time than any other college or flight school. NO FTDs (Simulators) are used towards flight time requirements. Our large multi-engine fleet is equipped with Garmin 430s, and ASPEN EFIS is being introduced.

The Aeronautical Science Program prepares the graduate for a career in the aviation industry by providing a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, aeronautical sciences, aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry. The graduate will receive an Associate of Science Degree, ratings through Flight Instructor Multi-Engine, including the ratings necessary to obtain intermediate level employment. The flight training sequence for this program consists of of four flight-training modules plus additional flight training as specified in each option.

ENROLL NOW FOR FALL CLASSES

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Pilot Certificates and Ratings for Airline Pilot Job

Pilot Certificates and Ratings for Airline Pilot JobPilot career is challenging and very rewarding at the same time. It may be one of the best times ever to learn to fly. The Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA) estimates that global aviation traffic will triple between now and 2035. As flight student in training, here is what you should know about flight training:

  • FACT: The current recession has created fierce competition for jobs in all industries. Now is the perfect opportunity for you to start your flight training in an industry that has tremendous potential!
  • FACT: Airline jobs are not going away, the demand is beginning to increase. For many current airline pilots, the mandatory retirement age is approaching!
  • FACT: The FAA is now taking a more serious look at airline pilot flight training. This is forcing the airline industry to take a harder look at candidates for pilot replacements!
  • FACT: Professional Pilots must now have first-rate knowledge and continually upgraded skills if they want to hear the word “Hired!” Pilots who train at quality aviation schools and who possess the technical knowledge, first-rate flying skills and a professional attitude will have the hiring edge!
  • FACT: Professionalism and knowledge are now prerequisites for entrance into the worldwide airline industry. Fast paced, “fast track” programs, or self-study courses will not meet the new airline industry standards.

The following pilot certificates and ratings are needed to succeed in becoming an airline pilot, written by av8er:

Private Pilot Certificate

If you want to become an airline pilot, you have to get a pilot’s license. The first step is getting a private pilot license. During this training you will get 40-80 hours of flight time, and learn basic stuff about airplanes like takeoffs and landings, navigation, maneuvers, weather and basic instrument skills. In case you are wondering about your vision, airline pilots need to have vision of correctable to 20/20. There are about 250,000 private pilots in America.

Instrument Rating

An instrument rating is the next step after the private pilot certificate. During your instrument rating or IR training you will add at least another 40-50 hours of flight time. You need to have IR or instrument rating because airlines always fly in all weather, so the pilot should be able to navigate without ever looking outside, and solely by reference to the cockpit instruments.

Commercial Pilot Certificate

After getting the instrument rating, you’d continue on to get your commercial pilot certificate; which requires 250 hours of total flight time, along with additional training which will make you a professional, safer, and experienced pilot. The commercial pilot certificate allows one to work for a commercial operator (for instance an airline) and get paid. Many people get their multi-engine rating at this time as well.

Building Flight Experience

Now that you’ve got your commercial pilot certificate with instrument rating and multi-engine rating, it’s time for you to build some flight experience. Since you probably have only about 300 hours of total time, airlines won’t typically consider you. Airline minimums are at least 1,500 hours, along with some other experience. Yes, there are always times when the demand is more than supply, and they end up hiring low time pilots as well, but it is rare, and very unpredictable.

Instructor Certificate

So how do you get from 300 hours to the 1500+ that you need for the airlines? The most common way is flight instructing. By becoming a flight instructor, you are able to build hours and get paid to teach others.

ATP Certificate

Major airlines usually do not consider hiring a pilot unless he/she has an ATP certificate; ATP or an Airline Transport Pilot Certificate is a requirement for one to be a captain on an aircraft with an airline. Regional airlines may hire you without one, which is a good way to build experience.

Get a 4 year College or University Degree

At least a four year college or university degree is preferred to land a job with a major airline. The degree does not have to be in Aviation; you can major in just about any field you want. You can always apply for airline jobs without a 4 year degree, but you’ll be competing with others who already have one. When it comes to investing the time and resources to interview, hire, and train applicants, employers always look at the best qualified applicants.

Start Applying

Once you’ve got the flight time, a college degree, and an ATP, and are ready to see if you’ve got what it takes, apply to every airline you can! This way you can be picky when you get interviews.

Pilot Training Program With Aviator Flight Training Academy 259 Flight Hours

Aviator Flight Training Academy offers professional pilot training programs with a minimum of 200 hours of multi-engine time. The flight school has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator), large classrooms and individual briefing rooms. CONTACT AVIATOR FOR DETAILS.

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Private Pilot License in USA and Europe

Private Pilot License in USA and EuropeMany people don’t quite understand the requirements needed to become a private pilot. To meet all of the requirements for the license you will need to cover many subject areas both on the ground and in the airplane. Many people don’t completely understand the Private Pilot License requirements needed and just look at the Private Pilot general requirements.

There are many requirements needed in order to complete each phase of your Private Pilot Training. Pre Solo, Post Solo and Flight test Preparation are the three phases of your private pilot license training. In most cases you will find something like this outline of the general requirements. Remember this is just the general requirements for you to be eligible to take the private pilot practical test.

  • 40 Hours Total
  • 20 Hours Dual Instruction
  • 10 Hours Solo
  • Now in other places you may see some added information
  • 3 Hours Instrument
  • 3 Hours Night
  • 5 Hours Solo Cross Country
Private Pilot License in the United States (FAA)

To obtain a PPL in the US all you need is an airplane and a certified instructor. This you can find by contacting your local flight club or a nearby flight school. If you look to obtain a PPL and fly for leisure (fun) it is seldom necessary to look far. Most cities across America with an airport have a flight club or a flight school.

Before getting the PPL you need a certain amount of training. You need a minimum of 40 hours flight time (most students have an average of 60-80 hours much depending on how often they fly) and you have to pass a written exam. Students who go with a flight club usually buy the textbooks and study on their own to pass the written exam. This is a computer based multiple-choice test of 60 questions. If you train with a flight school they may offer ground school classes that cover the theory.

While studying for the written you start flying with an instructor. He will teach you the basics needed to safely maneuver an aircraft. And after 15-20 hours of flight time you make your first solo flight.

The next 20-50 hours are dominated by dual flights with your instructor, cross country flights to learn how to properly navigate, solo training flights and solo cross country flights. When your instructor feels the necessary skill level is reached he signs you up for a check ride.

A check ride is conducted by a certified examiner and usually done in the airplane you learned how to fly. You start with an oral exam of about an hour. Here you are asked questions to test the knowledge level and you cover a pre-planned cross country flight. After passing the oral part of the check ride you fly.

The flying part of the PPL check ride takes from an hour to an hour and a half. Here you cover the basic maneuvers, navigation skills and take offs and landings. Often the ride is started of as a cross country flight where you fly the first check points on the cross country route before doing maneuvers and finish of with landing rounds at the airport.

After passing the check ride the examiner issue you a PPL and you are now an FAA pilot.

Private Pilot License in Europe (JAA)

To obtain a PPL in Europe you either have to join a flight school or become member of a flight club. The availability of training facilities vary depending on where in Europe you live, but if you want to obtain a private pilot license for leisure flying a flight club is usually the cheapest alternative.

Before getting the PPL you need a certain amount of training. You need a minimum of 40 hours flight time (most students have an average of 60-80 hours much depending on how often they fly) and you have to pass a written exam.

The written exam consists of 7 topics put together in a written multiple-choice test. As the theory is pretty time consuming most flight clubs or flight schools recommend you don’t fly very much before passing the exam.

Ones the written exam is out of the way you can concentrate on the flying. For the first 15-20 hours you and your instructor will cover the basics needed to safely maneuver an aircraft. You learn how to take off, climb, turn, decent and land. When your instructor feels comfortable you can do this safely he signs you of for a solo flight.

The next 20-50 hours are dominated by flights with your instructor, cross country flights to learn how to properly navigate, solo training flights and solo cross country flights. When your instructor feels the necessary skill level is reached he signs you up for a check ride.

A check ride is conducted by a certified examiner and usually done in the airplane you learned how to fly. You start by having a short oral exam. Here you are asked some questions to test the knowledge level and you cover a pre-planned cross country flight. After passing the oral you fly. After passing the oral part of the check ride you fly.

The flying part of the PPL check ride takes from an hour to an hour and a half. Here you cover the basic maneuvers, navigation skills and take offs and landings. Often the ride is started of as a cross country flight where you fly the first check points on the cross country route before doing maneuvers and finish of with landing rounds at the airport.

After passing the check ride the examiner issue you a PPL and you are now a JAA pilot.

Flight School Pro Pilot Programs

The programs at Aviator Academy are designed to provide what the airline industry demands of future commercial pilots. The training you will receive at Aviator is one of the most intensive and challenging programs offered in aviation today.

The school’s new 37,000 sq. ft. training facilities are open from 7 am to 6 pm daily and provisions are made to access the aircraft for flight training 24 hours-a-day, rain or shine.

During your flight training you will fly a total of 259 hours, of which 200 hours will be in a multi-engine aircraft. The ground school portion is a structured classroom environment. You will receive a minimum of 643 instructional hours, including all of the ground and flight training. Student housing is on a contract basis, pricing is selected from the options below, terms included in the students’ enrollment agreement are as follows: Private Pilot program includes 6 months of housing, if you come with a PPL 5 months will be included. Commercial Pilot program includes 4 months of housing, if you come with a PPL 3 months will be included. After your flight training, you will have the opportunity to become an entry level flight instructor.

Contact Aviator to learn about the details of the pro pilot training program of your choice.

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