Home > Uncategorized > Student Pilot Code of Conduct

Student Pilot Code of Conduct

Student Pilot Code of ConductBecoming a pilot is a truly exhilarating and rewarding endeavor. As a newcomer to general aviation (GA) you will be exposed to many new and exciting precepts. This blog will list some of the values associated with being an exemplary GA pilot as illustrated in this Student Pilot’s Model Code of Conduct (Code of Conduct).

Student Pilot

Student pilot is the 1st license/certificate needed for pilot. You do not need a certificate to begin your flight training. You would only need it before you can fly solo.

Student Pilot Eligibility
  • You are at least 16 years old. If you plan to pilot a glider or balloon, you must be at least 14 years old.
  • You can read, speak, and understand English
  • You hold at least a current third-class medical certificate. If you plan to pilot a glider or balloon, you only have to certify that you have no medical defect that would make you unable to pilot a glider or balloon
Aviators Model Code of Conduct

The AMCC (Aviators Model Code of Conduct) is for use by aviation practitioners — pilots, mechanics, organizations, and the entire aviation community. Designed to be adaptable by the implementer, it is provided without charge and periodically updated.

The latest version of the code was released in April, 2012.

The Aviators Model Code of Conduct “offers recommendations to advance flight safety, airmanship, and professionalism.” Version 2.0, the latest update in a suite of products that includes model codes for aviation maintenance technicians, flight instructors, glider aviators, light sport aviators, seaplane pilots, and student pilots, includes a new emphasis on professionalism, enhanced focus on safety culture, and an emphasis on flight training and simulation devices, according to Michael Baum, a member of the board.

The Aviators Model Code of Conduct “promotes flight and ground safety, professionalism, and pilot contributions to the aviation community and society at large; encourages the development and adoption of good judgment, ethical behavior, and personal responsibility; and supports improved communications between pilots, regulators, and others in the aviation industry,” according to a news release. The all-volunteer effort offers models of behavior that it encourages members of the aviation community to adapt to their specific needs.

As you pursue the goal of learning to fly, careful attention to understanding safety and excellence greatly enhances the quality of your current and future training (and may even accelerate it). It also helps you to cultivate a philosophy or attitude toward flying that will serve you and society well throughout your flying career.

It presents a vision of excellence for student pilots (whether they are seeking a Sport Pilot, Recreational Pilot, or Private Pilot certificate) with principles that both complement and supplement what is merely legal. The Code of Conduct is not a “standard” and is not intended to be implemented as such. Some of the provisions of the Code of Conduct have been simplified to accommodate the novice; after gaining more knowledge and experience, student pilots should refer to the Aviators’ Model Code of Conduct in the flight safety section.

The Principles:

The Code of Conduct consists of the following seven sections (each containing principles and sample recommended practices).

  1. General Responsibilities of Student Pilots
  2. Passengers and People on the Surface
  3. Training and Proficiency
  4. Security
  5. Environmental Issues
  6. Use of Technology
  7. Advancement and Promotion of General Aviation
The Sample Recommended Practices:

To further the effective use of the Code of Conduct’s principles, Sample Recommended Practices offer examples of ways student pilots might integrate the principles into their own training. The Sample Recommended Practices (which include selected personal minimums) can help student pilots and their instructors develop practices uniquely suited to their own activities and situations. Unlike the Code of Conduct principles themselves, the Sample Recommended Practices may be modified to satisfy the unique capabilities and requirements of each student pilot, mission, aircraft, and training program. Some Sample Recommended Practices do in fact exceed the stringency of their associated Code of Conduct principles. They are not presented in any particular order.

Benefits of the Code of Conduct:

The Code of Conduct may benefit student pilots and the GA community by:

  • highlighting important practices that will help student pilots become better, safer aviators,
  • suggesting a mental framework for flight training,
  • addressing individual pilot’s roles within the larger GA community, by examining issues such as improved pilot training, better airmanship, desired pilot conduct, personal responsibility, and pilots’ contributions to the GA community and society at large,
  • encouraging the development and adoption of ethical guidelines, and
  • bridging the gap between student and certificated pilots, with the goal of advancing a common aviation culture.
Student Pilots’ Model

Code of Conduct – Principles
1 General Responsibilities of Student Pilots
Student pilots should:

  1. make safety their number one priority,
  2. seek excellence in airmanship,
  3. develop and exercise good judgment,
  4. recognize and manage risks effectively,
  5. adhere to prudent operating practices and personal operating parameters (for example, minimums), as developed with your flight instructor,
  6. aspire to professionalism,
  7. act with responsibility and courtesy, and
  8. adhere to applicable laws and regulations.

Explanation: Code of Conduct Section I serves as a preamble to and umbrella for the Code of Conduct’s other principles. It emphasizes safety, excellence, risk management, responsibility, and lays the foundation for accountability and heightened diligence.

Sample Recommended Practices:
  • Recognize, accept, and plan for the costs of implementing proper safety practices (often greater than expected).
  • Learn to identify prevailing conditions and adapt to changing in-flight conditions as directed by your certificated flight instructor.
  • Recognize the increased risks associated with flying in inclement weather, at night, over water, and over rugged, mountainous or forested terrain. Take steps to manage those risks effectively and prudently without exceeding personal
  • Approach flying with the utmost seriousness and diligence, recognizing that your life and the lives of others depend on you.
  • parameters (see Code of Conduct I.e.).
  • Develop, use, periodically review, and refine personal checklists and personal minimums for all phases of flight operations. Seek the input and approval of these materials by your certificated flight instructor.
  • If the weather doesn’t look good, it probably isn’t – don’t push it.
  • Learn the performance limitations of all aircraft you fly, and how to plan flights and determine fuel requirements.
  • Understand and use appropriate procedures in the event radio communications are lost.
  • Be familiar with The Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR). They represent the distilled wisdom of more than 80 years of flying experience.
  • Commit to making personal wellness a precondition of flying.
  • See and be seen. Learn and employ techniques for seeing other aircraft, such as scanning, and techniques to enhance your own visibility to avoid other aircraft, such as the use of radio, lights, and strobes.
  • For cross-country operations, identify alternate landing sites and available fuel along the planned route prior to departure in case deteriorating weather or other emergency circumstances make continued flight unsafe.
  • Exercise great caution when maneuvering at low altitudes.
  • Develop a firm understanding of effective decision-making.
  • Adhere to applicable flying club/school and Fixed Base Operator/flight centre rules and operating practices.
  • Learn the fundamentals well before proceeding to more advanced techniques and maneuvers. Source
Flying Lessons at Aviator Flight Training Academy

The Aviator Flight Training Academy offers a full line of flight training courses to meet the individual needs of each student.

Contact Aviator
Schedule a visit
Speak with a flight instructor, call 772-672-8222.

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: