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Types of Flight Training Airplanes in Your Flight School

Types of Flight Training Airplanes in Your Flight SchoolYou never forget the first airplane you fly. No matter how many other aircraft you may pilot, that first trainer will always have a special place in your heart and your logbook. When you are researching a flight school for your flight training, ask questions about the fleet used and its maintenance.

Piper Fleet

Piper offers a comprehensive line of aircraft for every general aviation mission, from piston-powered trainers and high-performance aircraft for business use to turbine-powered business aircraft. Fleet operators around the world can look to Piper to meet a wide variety of missions. More specifically, Piper is the only general aviation manufacturer that can offer a full-line of flight training aircraft. In fact, flight training schools around the world are finding both financial and logistical reasons for going full-line, and they are choosing Piper as their supplier.

Piper offers the most rugged, reliable and attractive training fleet in the air. From the dependable, primary, fixed-gear Warrior III, to the complex single engine Arrow, to the multi-engine, advanced-training Seminole, Piper offers you a complete, versatile fleet of trainers that advances with your students.

The Fleet Sales Department at Piper has been successful in building important relationships and partnerships with top-notch fleet operators and flight schools. Whether you are looking to create or replace a fleet of training or business aircraft, Piper will be the right choice (source).

FAA orders fleet-wide inspections on four Piper models

Thousands of Piper Aircraft owners are required to inspect a historically problematic component for cracks and make replacements as necessary.

The airworthiness directive published on 5 February affects 34,013 aircraft in the US registry – the entire fleet of PA-28 Cherokees, PA-32 Cherokee Sixes, PA-34 Senecas and PA-44 Seminoles older than 15 years.

The US Federal Aviation Administration estimates the cost of the 5h inspection on the horizontal stabilator control system at $425 per aircraft, or $14.5 million across the US fleet. Replacement parts and labour adds another $1,458 per aircraft to the total bill.

Piper owners and federal regulators have long been aware of failures caused by assembly errors on a Bell-Memphis-built turnbuckle in the horizontal stabilator. Investigators have linked the problem to 14 failures on Pipers and one on a Cessna 172.

In August, the FAA proposed a new rulemaking requiring another round of inspections and replacement parts, but this time making the checks mandatory to maintain airworthiness of the aircraft.
Piper has previously recommended inspections of the control cable assembly, issuing two service bulletings to operators since 2010.

“Piper is proud of its overall fleet safety record and is diligent in assuring the safest operations possible for the thousands of Piper owners and operators throughout the world,” the comapny says (full details, source).

Aircraft & Maintenance at Aviator Flight Training Academy

Aviator fleet consists of 11 multi-engine and 19 single engine aircraft.

The Aviator fleet is made up of multi-engine and single-engine aircraft. The primary aircraft used in our training programs are the Beechcraft BE-76 Duchess, Piper Warrior III PA-128, and the Cessna 172 Skyhawk, all are well known as training aircraft the world over. Our fleet also includes a Piper Arrow and a J-3 Cub. All aircraft are maintained in our maintenance facilities located here at the St. Lucie County International Airport. We average more than 35,000 hours of flight time per year. They are all equipped for VFR and IFR flight per FAR 91.205 (except the J-3 Cub which is VFR Day only).

Beechcraft BE-76 Duchess

The Beechcraft Duchess, also known at the BE-76, was designed as a general aviation, light twin training aircraft. A little sister to the Beechcraft Baron, the Duchess was chosen by Aviator as our multi-engine training aircraft because of the durability built into the product by Beechcraft. All of the Duchess aircraft at Aviator are equipped for instrument operations with an HSI and a VOR; many of the aircraft also have an ADF. Because the future is area navigation (RNAV), we have multiple aircraft equipped with Garmin 430 GPS systems. Having a broad range of learning options is the best way to help ensure future employment. The Duchess fleet is currently being upgraded to ASPEN glass cockpits. Several aircraft are equipped with weather radar and/or lightning strike detectors.

Cessna 172 Skyhawk

The Cessna 172 is the most widely used primary training aircraft in the world. Aviator uses the Cessna for private pilot and single engine training with Garmin EFIS Systems.

Piper Warrior III PA – 128

Aviator College welcomes it’s new fleet of Piper Warrior III airplanes equipped with Avadyne EFIS Systems.

Maintenance

Aviator has its own in-house maintenance facility, a 13,000 square foot environmentally approved hangar. Maintenance is under the supervision of the FAA. All technicians hold Airplane & Powerplant Certificates or better. Maintenance is open six days a week.

CONTACT AVIATOR
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Distributed by Viestly

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What is A Pilot’s Error

What is A Pilot’s ErrorPilot error (sometimes called cockpit error) occurs when the pilot is considered to be principally or partially responsible for an aircraft accident. Pilot error can be a mistake, oversight, lapse in judgement, or failure to exercise due diligence by pilots during the performance of their duties.

Usually in an accident caused by pilot error, the pilot in command is seen as making an error unintentionally. However, an intentional disregard for a standard operating procedure (or warning) is still considered pilot error, even if the pilot’s actions justified criminal charges.

The term “pilot error” makes the blood of pilots, private and commercial, run cold. This is the term used when a plane has some kind of accident that can be traced back to the pilot’s direct error, or failure to exercise due diligence. No pilot wants to make a mistake, or a bad decision during a flight. If something happens during a flight, having the accident attributed to pilot error may mean the pilot did not do all he or she could have done to have avoided the accident.

Because so much redundancy is built into every system of a commercial aircraft, the “pilot error” label takes on an additional layer of meaning. If a commercial flight accident is labeled “pilot error,” then the pilot must truly have made a major mistake. This is not necessarily the case, although some accidents point to nothing but pilot or crew error. The bottom line is that the pilot controls the aircraft and has the final word on all operations, so even a mistake made by another crew member can be called pilot error.

Private pilots are more vulnerable to the consequences of their decisions than their commercial-flying counterparts. Their aircraft are lighter and have fewer redundant systems to help avoid losing all electrical systems, for instance. In fact, one estimate says that 78 percent of all private aircraft accidents are due to pilot error. Whether this was an actual mistake on the pilot’s part or merely a decision that didn’t work out, is not specified. All are listed under the same category. Also, a pilot flying solo might be willing to take risks he or she would never take if carrying passengers (source).

The crash rate on private-pilot flights — up 20 percent since 2000 — contrasts with a roughly 85 percent drop in accidents on commercial jetliners, according to data from the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board. The disparity is a dark spot on decades of aviation-safety improvements, and the board is weighing how to make non-commercial flying less hazardous in a two-day forum that began today.

Many so-called general aviation accidents have resulted from pilots’ inattention to basics, according to research by a group run jointly by industry and the federal government. Pilots have overloaded planes, failed to check weather reports, and made flying mistakes that caused planes to lose lift or go out of control.

Top 10 Pilot Errors

One of the most disturbing statistics about general aviation accidents is that more than 75% of them are made because of pilot error. Top 10 pilot errors are listed below. For complete description of each error, please visit the source.

  1. Weather. The more a pilot knows about it, the better. While thunderstorms, icing and winds claim their share of airplanes, the real weather gadfly are those serene, innocent-looking clouds and their cousin, fog.
  2. CFIT. Another common pilot error that often involves weather is controlled flight into terrain (CFIT). A simplified definition of CFIT is “flying a perfectly good airplane into the ground.” If a pilot is in a cloud or in fog, he or she can’t see the ground. If the pilot isn’t doing a good job of keeping up with the terrain, an unpleasant meeting with the ground is more likely. Another time when CFIT can be a factor independent of weather is at night
  3. Poor Communication. Another boo-boo pilots seem to have an affinity for involves deficient communication. This difficulty of communicating comes in several forms. When dealing with air traffic control (ATC), pilots tend to hear what they want to hear. Good pilots anticipate what is coming next, including ATC instructions; however, this profound skill can trick the mind into “hearing” what is expected regardless of what actually filters into one’s headset.
  4. Low-Level Maneuvering. If you ever hear the words “watch this” from a pilot, look out! Pilots are notorious show-offs. How many times have you heard about the pilot who performs an impromptu air show for friends and significant others? A few low-level maneuvers later, and the plane is falling out of the sky. Some air show. The problem isn’t just that pilots are flying low to the ground; it’s this combination of flying too slow and in too tight of a turn that causes crashes.
  5. Inadequate Preflight Inspections. It’s amazing how many pilots mess up preflight inspections. A cursory walk around simply to “kick the tires” so you can hurry up and “light the fires” is beckoning for trouble. Take your time during your preflight. If you find yourself inspecting in haste, slow down. Take a comprehensive look at everything, with checklist in hand, to make sure you don’t miss anything. When you finish, scrutinize the details.
  6. Inadequate Preflight Planning. Renowned classical novelist Miguel de Cervantes wisely said “forewarned forearmed.” Those who are prepared are equipped to deal with the tasks at hand. Typically, the level of preflight preparation is proportional to how smoothly the flight goes.
  7. Failure to Use a Checklist. Lots of pilots get into the mindset that flying is like riding a bike—something you can do easily out of memory. While it’s true that 99% of the time, you’ll remember to do everything required of the checklist, it’s that remaining 1% of the time when you forget to do something that will bite. You can make sure you complete everything you need to all the time if you consistently use a checklist. Sure, you can do cockpit flows or whatever other technique you like, but back up your actions with a checklist. And don’t just blindly read it. As you go through each item, verify that the handle is in the right position or something has actually been accomplished. Just think of the number of gear-up accidents that could have been avoided if the pilots actually ran the before-landing checklist (hint: all of them!).
  8. Failure to Perform the “I’M SAFE” Checklist. Another common error of pilots is forgetting to use the “I’M SAFE” checklist. For those who have forgotten what the letters stand for, here’s a reminder: Illness, Medication, Stress, Alcohol, Fatigue and Emotion (some say E is for Eating).
  9. Running Out of Fuel. It truly is unbelievable how many pilots run out of fuel every year. It’s interesting to note that most of these incidents occur not because, say, the fueler didn’t put enough gas on board. Instead, pilots try to push it just a little bit too far, running out of gas just short of their destination.
  10. Mismanagement of Technology. Scientist and novelist C.P. Snow once said that “technology is a peculiar thing. It brings you great gifts in one hand and stabs you in the back with the other.” The mismanagement of technology is a pilot error that has come under particular scrutiny lately, as glass instrumentation has quickly been invading the cockpits of general aviation aircraft.

Distributed by Viestly

Glass Cockpit Planes For Pilot Training

December 7, 2012 Leave a comment

Glass Cockpit Planes For Pilot TrainingA glass cockpit is an aircraft cockpit that features electronic (digital) instrument displays, typically large LCD screens, rather than the traditional style of analog dials and gauges. While a traditional cockpit relies on numerous mechanical gauges to display information, a glass cockpit uses several displays driven by flight management systems, that can be adjusted to display flight information as needed. This simplifies aircraft operation and navigation and allows pilots to focus only on the most pertinent information. They are also popular with airline companies as they usually eliminate the need for a flight engineer. In recent years the technology has become widely available in small aircraft.

As aircraft displays have modernized, the sensors that feed them have modernized as well. Traditional gyroscopic flight instruments have been replaced by electronic Altitude and Heading Reference Systems (AHRSes) and Air Data Computers (ADCs), improving reliability and reducing cost and maintenance. GPS receivers are usually integrated into glass cockpits.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) initiated this study to determine if the transition to glass cockpits in light aircraft has improved the safety record of those aircraft.

Introduction of Glass Cockpit Avionics into Light Aircraft

NTSB Number SS-10/01
NTIS Number PB2010-917001
source link

Three different approaches were used in this study. First, a retrospective statistical analysis of manufacturer records, aircraft investigation information, and activity survey data was conducted to compare the accident experience of recently manufactured light single-engine airplanes equipped and not equipped with glass cockpit displays. Second, an evaluation of glass cockpit training requirements and resources was conducted to characterize the training and to identify areas for potential safety improvement. Finally, accident cases were reviewed to identify emerging safety issues associated with the introduction of glass cockpit displays into this class of aircraft.

The statistical analysis found that for 2002–2008, light single-engine aircraft equipped with glass cockpit displays experienced lower total accident rates—but higher fatal accident rates—than the same type of aircraft equipped with conventional analog instrumentation. Accidents involving glass cockpit aircraft were more likely to be associated with personal/business flights, longer flights, instrument flight plans, and single-pilot operations, while accidents involving conventional analog cockpit aircraft were more likely to be associated with instructional flights, shorter flights, and two-pilot operations. Accident pilots flying glass cockpit equipped aircraft were found to have higher levels of pilot certification and more total flight experience than those flying conventional aircraft.

The evaluation of light aircraft glass cockpit training requirements found that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been updating training handbooks and test standards to incorporate generic information about electronic flight instrument displays. However, current airman knowledge written tests (such as private pilot, instrument rating, commercial pilot, and flight instructor certificates) do not assess pilots’ knowledge of the functionality of glass cockpit displays. In addition, the FAA has no specific training requirements for pilots operating glass cockpit-equipped light aircraft. The lack of equipment-specific training requirements from the FAA results in a wide range of initial and recurrent training experiences among pilots of glass cockpit aircraft. With the exception of training provided by airframe manufacturers with the purchase of a new aircraft, pilots must currently seek out and obtain equipment-specific glass cockpit training on their own.

The review of accidents involving light aircraft equipped with glass cockpits found that pilots’ experiences and training in conventional cockpits do not prepare them to safely operate the complex and varied glass cockpit systems being installed in light aircraft today. Further, the lack of information provided to pilots about glass cockpit systems may lead them to misunderstand or misinterpret system failures. As a result, there is a need for new training procedures and tools to ensure that pilots are adequately prepared to safely operate aircraft equipped with glass cockpit avionics.

The results of this study suggest that the introduction of glass cockpits has not resulted in a measurable improvement in safety when compared to similar aircraft with conventional instruments. The analyses conducted during the study identified safety issues in two areas:

The need for pilots to have sufficient equipment-specific knowledge and proficiency to safely operate aircraft equipped with glass cockpit avionics.
The need to capture maintenance and operational information in order to assess the reliability of glass cockpit avionics in light aircraft.

As a result of this safety study, the NTSB made six recommendations to the FAA: five address training requirements and one addresses reporting requirements.

Glass Cockpit Planes From Aviator College

To meet the new demands of airlines and enhance pilot training, Aviator College has begun an expansion of its all “glass” cockpit planes. The college has just received its first delivery of Piper aircraft equipped with Avidyne Entegra Electronic Flight Instrument Systems, with a second delivery expected in late December. Our ultimate goal is to have our entire fleet equipped with all “glass” instrument systems.

Flight Training Aircraft & Maintenance

Our fleet consists of 14 multi-engine and 12 single engine aircraft
The Aviator fleet is made up of multi-engine and single-engine aircraft. The primary aircraft used in our training programs are the Beechcraft BE-76 Duchess and the Cessna 172 Skyhawk, both well known as training aircraft the world over. Our fleet also includes a Piper Arrow and a J-3 Cub. All aircraft are maintained in our maintenance facilities located here at the St. Lucie County International Airport. We average more than 35,000 hours of flight time per year. They are all equipped for VFR and IFR flight per FAR 91.205 (except the J-3 Cub which is VFR Day only).

Beechcraft BE-76 Duchess

The Beechcraft Duchess, also known at the BE-76, was designed as a general aviation, light twin training aircraft. A little sister to the Beechcraft Baron, the Duchess was chosen by Aviator as our multi-engine training aircraft because of the durability built into the product by Beechcraft. All of the Duchess aircraft at Aviator are equipped for instrument operations with an HSI and a VOR; many of the aircraft also have an ADF. Because the future is area navigation (RNAV), we have multiple aircraft equipped with Garmin 430 GPS systems. Having a broad range of learning options is the best way to help ensure future employment. The Duchess fleet is currently being upgraded to ASPEN glass cockpits. Several aircraft are equipped with weather radar and/or lightning strike detectors.

Cessna 172 Skyhawk

The Cessna 172 is the most widely used primary training aircraft in the world. Aviator uses the Cessna for private pilot and single engine training.

Maintenance

Aviator has its own in-house maintenance facility, a 13,000 square foot environmentally approved hangar. Maintenance is under the supervision of the FAA. All technicians hold Airplane & Powerplant Certificates or better. Maintenance is open six days a week.

* Aircraft are used for flight training only
NO AIRCRAFT RENTALS ARE OFFERED

Contact Aviator
Enroll Now
Schedule a Visit

Distributed by Viestly

Safety Lapses By Commercial Operators and Aviation Regulators

November 14, 2012 Leave a comment

Safety Lapses By Commercial Operators and Aviation RegulatorsVALETTA, MALTA and LEIMUIDEN, THE NETHERLANDS – Licensed Aircraft Maintenance Engineers attending the 40th AEI (Aircraft Engineers International) Annual Congress in Valletta, Malta were presented with a staggering amount of evidence detailing safety lapses by both commercial operators and aviation regulators. Indeed delegates were also informed that recent ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organisation) safety audit results revealed some shocking truths about the aviation industry.

ICAO figures show an average rate of compliance with their regulations of around 60% whilst national aviation safety regulator manning levels have on average only attained 24% of their target levels.

 “A scandalous situation,” says Fred Bruggeman, AEI’s Secretary General.

 “These facts explain why regulatory authorities consistently fail to uncover, let alone correct, serious safety lapses.”

AEI have previously claimed that safety regulators fail to investigate serious safety lapses and Mr Bruggeman says

 “we now know why. It is not possible for industry regulators to oversee a safety-critical industry without being properly resourced.”

Delegates at congress were presented with evidence and advice on how to deal with the ever-increasing methods employed by commercial operators to avoid their safety responsibilities. Occurrence reporting and whistleblowing were also discussed as airlines, supported by regulators, wish to further deregulate the industry by making the commercial operator fully responsible for safety. This move towards self-regulation is apparently based upon an open and transparent safety reporting system. The evidence presented to congress, however, suggested that the aviation industry is not yet ready to take on such responsibility.

Licensed Aircraft Maintenance Engineers are responsible for certifying that an aircraft is in a condition for safe operation. They are licensed independently of the airlines by national aviation authorities rather than by the airlines themselves which should ensure maintenance activities are performed in the correct manner, to the highest standards and that safety is not compromised. The naming of licensed personnel with authority to release aircraft into service by signature is an accepted method of accountability that applies worldwide.

It also reflects the fact that aircraft maintenance is an area of high potential danger and therefore critical to safe flight operations. Despite this, those same airlines pushing for self-regulation based upon a culture of open reporting and transparency are quite happy to terminate the employment of Licensed Aircraft Engineers raising safety issues. Colleagues who take their safety responsibilities seriously are often deemed by airlines to be a problem and all too often a simple logic prevails: shoot the messenger and you remove the problem.

An unacceptable situation for AEI President Robert Alway:

“Pressure on Aircraft Engineers to overlook safety issues has been steadily increasing as the priority for airlines shifts from safety to profit. Regulators need to do more to protect Aircraft Engineers who report safety problems. After all, their actions could well prevent an accident and that is most certainly in the public interest.”

Distributed by Viestly

Why FAA Safetfy Regulations are Important to Know During Flight Training

If you are aspiring to be a pilot, it is important during your flight training to pay attention to safety regulations and directives passed by the Federal Aviation Administration. Being a pilot can be a dangerous job and if operating aircraft is your dream, be sure to consider all of the factors involved.

Window Inspections

As recently as July 9, Bloomberg Businessweek reported that the Federal Aviation Administration said US operators of Boeing Co. 757, 767, and 777 aircraft must inspect or replace the forward-facing cockpit windows. There is a risk of fire caused by loose electrical connections used to heat the window to prevent ice from forming.

In the past two decades, there were only 11 reports of fire or flames. The most recent incident was on May 16 when a United Airlines 757 was forced to make an emergency landing at Washington Dulles International Airport.

The airworthiness directive is assigning operators to being with inspections within 500 flight hours, or simply install a new, redesigned window. The FAA announced the intentions for the Boeing 747’s later this year. Although there have not been any reported fires, the windows are very similar.

The directive covers 1,212 US aircraft and will cost carriers about $103,020. The directive is in effect today, July 13.

Recent Aircraft Accident

According to the Aviation Safety Network the most recent fatal accident involving a Boeing aircraft, occurred in India. A Boeing 737-800 passenger plane operated by Air India Express, was destroyed when it crashed while landing at Mangalore-Bajpe Airport.

Preliminary reports suggest that the airplane overran the runway and slid down a wooded valley, bursting into flames. There were 160 passengers and six crew members on board. Only eight occupants survived the accident.

Flight Training Safety

Safety is likely the most important aspect of flight training you will take away from flight training school. Websites like the Aviation Safety Network and the FAA can help you stay up to date with passing regulations and accident occurrences during your flight training.

How Visiting the Air Zoo can Help Your Flight Training

The Air Zoo, formerly known as the Kalamazoo Aviation History Museum was founded in 1977 to preserve the history of aviation for future generations. Known as the number one aviation museum in the world, it is a great environment for flight training students to learn about the legacy of flight and more.

Aircraft

Inside the almost 200,000 square-foot facility, The Air Zoo’s aircraft collection has no rival. The Air Zoo prides itself in housing the “Giants of history, performance, accomplishment, and reputation.” Some of these giants include a Curtiss P-40 Warhawk, an FA-18A Hornet, an F-14 Tomcat (the star of Top Gun), and an SR-71 Blackbird spy plane.

 

The Air Zoo even features an SBD Dauntless, which was fully restored after spending nearly 50 years under water.

Artwork

The Air Zoo has a Murals and Art facility that is home to some of the greatest original paintings, prints, and sculptures. Some works were created by major artists such as Kirk Newman, Jean Flower, Alan D’Estrehan, and many more.

The Air Zoo features the Guinness World Record’s largest hand-painted indoor mural called the “Century of Flight.” Created by renowned flight artist Rick Herter and his assistant Tony Hendrick, the mural reaches an astonishing 28,800 square feet and took longer than 14 months to complete. It was painted with 400 gallons of oil paint.

Exhibits

In addition to the phenomenal aircraft and artwork, the Air Zoo is also home to several educational exhibits.

The National Guadalcanal Memorial Museum is a nationally-recognized memorial commemorating the Guadalcanal campaign of World War II. The campaign was known as one of the longest and bloodiest campaigns of the whole war. The memorial features a large collection of artifacts, dioramas, narratives, and the Wall of Honor spotlighting 20 men who earned the Medal of Honor for their sacrifices on the island.

The newest exhibit is the first of its kind in the Midwest. The Fly Girls of World War II, showcases the inspirational history of Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP). It features original uniforms, a history mural, photo collages, a timeline, and a mosaic that includes each of the 1,102 WASP.

Student Pilots

If you are interested in becoming a pilot, visiting the Air Zoo is an exceptional experience that will only enhance your flight training and education. It may even give you a new appreciation for the legacy of aviation.

Explore the Air Zoo website to plan your visit.

What Kind of Professional Pilot Program to Look for in Flight Training

Becoming a pilot is a serious career commitment. The airline industry holds very high standards for their professional pilots so it is very important to choose a flight training program that will educate you with a structured, effective curriculum.

Find an intensive and challenging flight training program that will provide what the airline industry demands of future professional pilots.

Professional Pilot Programs

There are important factors to look for when choosing a flight training school. Some of these include academic training in an organized environment, valuable ground and flight training, and a superior campus with housing facilities.

In terms of how long your professional pilot program training will last, quality flight training schools provide a minimum of 520 hours of instruction, and require at least 250 hours of actual flight. If you are training to be a professional pilot, at least 200 of those hours will be logged in a multi-engine aircraft. A good school will not log any of your flight hours in a flight simulator, or flight training device.

Aircraft & Maintenance

Generally a large fleet of aircraft is also an important factor to consider when searching for a good flight training school for you. Aviator College has a fleet of 14 multi-engine and 12 single engine aircraft.

The aircraft primarily used during training are the Beechcraft BE-76 and the Cessna 172 Skyhawk. The fleet also includes a Piper Arrow and a J-3 Cub. All aircraft are equipped for VFR and IFR flight (with the exception of the J-3 Cub, which is VFR Day only).

The aircraft are maintained in the maintenance facilities in St. Lucie County International Airport. Aviator has its own in-house maintenance facility as well, it is a 13,000 square foot environmentally approved hangar open six days a week. All maintenance technicians hold Airplane and Powerplant Certificates or better.