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Does Your Flight School Offer The Best Flight Training Aircrafts

Does Your Flight School Offer The Best Flight Training AircraftsIf flying is your passion invest in time and research to find the best flight instructors and quality flight training programs approved by FAA. What flight training aircraft offered for flight training and how it is maintained is also crucial to your flight training experience.

The Flight Training Airplane

The training airplane is where you practice in the air what you’ve learned on the ground. High wing or low, it doesn’t make much difference. What’s important is how well the airplane is equipped and maintained. It’s also important that the school’s trainers are dedicated to pilot training and not to airplane rental.
How many training airplanes a school has depends on the number of active students. Generally speaking, one trainer serves four or five full-time students. This ratio may be higher with part-time students. Another consideration is the training fleet’s mix of primary, advanced, and multi-engine airplanes.

Because trainers are flown often and sometimes hard, how a flight school maintains its training fleet is important for both safety and scheduling. Asking questions about maintenance policies and procedures should be part of every flight school interview.

You’ll never forget the first airplane you fly. No matter how many other aircraft you may pilot, that first trainer will always have a special place in your heart and your logbook. However, picking the plane or helicopter you learn to fly in should to some degree be based upon your flying goals and your budget. Basic trainers are solid little airplanes with just enough room for you and you instructor. These “two-place” or two-passenger aircraft making learning to fly as easy as possible while keeping your flying cost low. Most are very forgiving to fly and are more tolerant of a beginner’s mistakes. However, they can also be a bit sparse when it comes to equipment and, in some cases, comfort. If you and your wallet are a bit bigger, then you may want to consider learning in a larger four-place (four-passenger) aircraft. Your costs will be higher, but you won’t have to transition or “move up” from your trainer when you want to take your spouse and two children for their first ride. These aircraft also tend to be capable of flying farther and faster, and have more advanced avionics that will help if you later decide to earn your instrument rating. source

The Cessna 172 Skyhawk is one of the most common airplanes used by flight schools. The four-seat airplane can be used for primary and advanced flight training, but it is also a practical rental aircraft for cross-country flights. The Skyhawk’s two doors make boarding very easy for student and instructor alike and provide ample ventilation while on the ground during warm weather. Handling qualities are docile and reasonably well balanced. Because the Skyhawk is the most popular airplane in the world, with more than 40,000 built in the last 50 years, you’ll be able to rent and fly from almost any airport worldwide.

Cessna 150/152

Some people say that since the end of World War II, more pilots have learned to fly in the Cessna 150 or 152 than any other type of airplane. These two Cessna models leave complexity behind in favor of low operating costs, reliability, and ease of use. It’s the docile handling of the two-seat airplanes that makes them so enjoyable to fly. Like everything else in the aircraft’s design, handling characteristics require very little effort. Source

Cessna Flight Training

Why Cessna

For more than eight decades Cessna has been innovating aircraft engineering to lead the world of aviation.
Continuing that tradition of pioneering in aviation technology, we are driven by ingenuity.
Our Expertise

Engineering and design

We have been reinventing the way you fly for more than 85 years. Our aeronautical engineers have imagined hundreds of original aircraft concepts into clean sheet designs advancing to the latest computer-enhanced technology and flight-simulation tools and, finally, to prototype. Because it takes years for a new aircraft to reach its maiden flight, we are always designing for tomorrow’s world.

Aircraft design

Each area of each aircraft design fulfills a function while its form remains noticeably simple.

Safety comes standard

Safety is the top priority for Cessna when designing and manufacturing aircraft. Everything from simple flying procedures to many standard emergency systems help to prevent errors and make handling simple and smooth. Our aircraft are designed both to react effectively to dangerous situations and to avoid them altogether. Combining both active and passive safety features ensures that every new aircraft is designed and equipped to deliver on the trust that passengers place in both pilot and machine every single flight.

Certifications

To prove our commitment to safety, we pursue a number of certification levels for each aircraft we build, including day, night, VFR, IFR, and flight into known icing conditions. Our aircraft are compliant with all RVSM-certification requirements. And, because specific approval is required for flying within civil and international airspace, Cessna offers owners a no-charge service to assist with this process.

Cessna Skyhawk

Introducing the world’s most popular aircraft. With more than 43,000 aircraft with several model variants delivered, the Skyhawk is the best-selling, most-flown plane ever built. It also enjoys a distinguished reputation as the safest general aviation aircraft available. The Skyhawk is a top performer, showcasing the agility, stability, and durable strength that Cessna is famous for.

Cessna engineering team designed the Skyhawk’s cockpit with the latest in avionic technology and the most advanced application of ergonomic sciences available. The flight deck is powered by the Garmin G1000® avionics suite, including optional integrated Garmin Synthetic Vision Technology (SVT™) and an automatic flight control system. Two 10.4-inch, high-resolution liquid crystal displays show flight instrumentation, traffic data, digital altitude, moving maps, navigation, communication, and other real-time flight-critical data.

See the future

The Skyhawk’s flight deck can include the optional Garmin Synthetic Vision Technology (SVT™), which offers sophisticated graphics modeling of terrain, traffic, and obstacles in the flight path. The system looks at the entire flight path via satellite and renders a three-dimensional “virtual reality” landscape, which is displayed on one or both primary flight displays. This technology prepares you for what lies ahead in plenty of time to plan for it and gives you a clear visual of any traffic around your aircraft, even in solid IFR (instrument flight rules) or nighttime VFR (visual flight rules) conditions.

Digital weather radar

With the optional GDL 69A data link receiver and a subscription to XM WX Satellite Weather, you will see a high-resolution representation of the weather along your flight path on your high-resolution primary flight display. The GDL 69 offers NEXRAD, METARs, TAFs, lightning, and more that you can layer directly over optional Jeppesen or standard topographic map databases. Global weather information is available through the optional GSR 56, which connects you to the Iridium satellite network. Voice and text messaging connectivity as well as position reporting and digital color radar data are included.

Skyhawk Performance
  • Maximum Cruise Speed 124 ktas (230 km/h)
  • Maximum Range 610 nm (1,130 km)
  • Takeoff
  • Takeoff Distance
  • Ground Roll
  • 1,630 ft (497 m)
  • 960 ft (293 m)
  • Landing
  • Landing Distance
  • Ground Roll
  • 1,335 ft (407 m)
  • 575 ft (175 m)
  • Maximum Operating Altitude 14,000 ft (4,267 m)
  • Maximum Climb Rate 730 fpm (223 mpm)
  • Maximum Limit Speed 163 kias (302 km/h)
  • Stall Speed 48 kcas (89 km/h)

Source

Aviator Flight Training Aircraft & Maintenance

Our fleet consists of 10 multi-engine and 26 single engine aircraft
The Aviator fleet is made up of multi-engine and single-engine aircraft. The primary aircraft used in our training programs are the Beechcraft BE-76 Duchess, Piper Warrior III PA-28, and the Cessna 172 Skyhawk, all are well known as training aircraft the world over. Our fleet also includes a Piper Arrow and a J-3 Cub. All aircraft are maintained in our maintenance facilities located here at the St. Lucie County International Airport. We average more than 35,000 hours of flight time per year. They are all equipped for VFR and IFR flight per FAR 91.205 (except the J-3 Cub which is VFR Day only).

Beechcraft BE-76 Duchess

The Beechcraft Duchess, also known at the BE-76, was designed as a general aviation, light twin training aircraft. A little sister to the Beechcraft Baron, the Duchess was chosen by Aviator as our multi-engine training aircraft because of the durability built into the product by Beechcraft. All of the Duchess aircraft at Aviator are equipped for instrument operations with an HSI and a VOR; many of the aircraft also have an ADF. Because the future is area navigation (RNAV), we have multiple aircraft equipped with Garmin 430 GPS systems. Having a broad range of learning options is the best way to help ensure future employment. The Duchess fleet is currently being upgraded to ASPEN glass cockpits. Several aircraft are equipped with weather radar and/or lightning strike detectors.

Cessna 172 Skyhawk

The Cessna 172 is the most widely used primary training aircraft in the world. Aviator uses the Cessna for private pilot and single engine training with Garmin EFIS Systems.

Piper Warrior III PA – 128

Aviator College welcomes it’s new fleet of Piper Warrior III airplanes equipped with Avadyne EFIS Systems.

Maintenance

Aviator has its own in-house maintenance facility, a 13,000 square foot environmentally approved hangar. Maintenance is under the supervision of the FAA. All technicians hold Airplane & Powerplant Certificates or better. Maintenance is open six days a week.