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Student Pilot License, Pilot Training and Limitations

Student Pilot License, Pilot Training and LimitationsAll pilots start out as students. With the proper training, the student pilot certificate allows you to work toward the first big milestone in aviation: the solo. A solo is when your instructor believes you are ready fly on your own. It will be one of the most exciting and memorable moments of your life. After additional flight training, you earn either your private, recreational, or sport pilot certificate, which allows you to take one or more passengers for rides.

Student Pilot’s Certificate Requirements
When do I need a student pilot certificate?

Before you can fly solo. You don’t need a student pilot certificate to take flying lessons.

Am I eligible for a student pilot certificate?

You are eligible if:

  • You are at least 16 years old. If you plan to pilot a glider or balloon, you must be at least 14 years old.
  • You can read, speak, and understand English
  • You hold at least a current third-class medical certificate. If you plan to pilot a glider or balloon, you only have to certify that you have no medical defect that would make you unable to pilot a glider or balloon.
How do I get a student pilot certificate?

Upon your request, an FAA-authorized aviation medical examiner will issue you a combined medical certificate and Student Pilot Certificate after you complete your physical examination. Student Pilot Certificates may be issued by an FAA inspector or an FAA-designated pilot examiner. Applicants who fail to meet certain requirements or who have physical disabilities which might limit, but not prevent, their acting as pilots, should contact the nearest FAA office.

How long are my student pilot certificate and my medical certificate valid?

Please refer to 14 CFR 61.23 for complete information.

  1. A student pilot certificate expires 24 calendar months from the month in which it is issued. A third class medical certificate expires:
  2. If under age 40 on the date of examination, at the end of the last day of the 60th month after the month after the date of examination.
  3. If age 40 or older on the date of examination, at the end of the last day of the 24th month after the month after the date of examination.
Can I renew my student certificate and medical certificate?

No, but you can get a new one.

If my original Student Pilot Certificate has been endorsed for solo flying, do I lose this endorsement on my new certificate?

No, the endorsements are still valid. However, they are not transferred to the new certificate. Keep the old certificate as a record of these endorsements.

Should my flight instructor endorse my student pilot certificate before or after my first solo flight?

Before the solo flight. The endorsement certifies that you are competent to solo.

If I solo in more than one make or model of aircraft, must I have an endorsement for each on my student pilot certificate? If so, who should endorse the certificate?

Yes. Your flight instructor must make this endorsement before you solo in each make or model of aircraft.

Does the endorsement to solo allow me to make solo cross-country flights?

No. You also have to get a cross-country flight endorsement from you flight instructor.
Must I carry my student pilot certificate with me when I am piloting an aircraft in solo flight?
Yes.

Is there a charge for the student pilot certificate?

Not when it’s issued by an FAA Flight Standards District Office. However, an FAA-designated pilot examiner can charge for issuing student pilot certificates. Also, an FAA-authorized aviation medical examiner can charge for your physical examination in connection with issuing the combination medical certificate and student pilot certificate.

§ 61.87 Solo Requirements for Student Pilots

(a) General. A student pilot may not operate an aircraft in solo flight unless that student has met the requirements stated above. The term “solo flight” means that flight time during which a student pilot is the sole occupant of the aircraft or that flight time during which the student performs the duties of a pilot in command of a gas balloon or an airship requiring more than one pilot flight crewmember.

(b) Aeronautical knowledge. A student pilot must demonstrate satisfactory aeronautical knowledge on a knowledge test that meets the requirements of this paragraph:
(1) The test must address the student pilot’s knowledge of—
(i) Applicable sections of parts 61 and 91 of this chapter;
(ii) Airspace rules and procedures for the airport where the solo flight will be performed; and
(iii) Flight characteristics and operational limitations for the make and model of aircraft to be flown.
(2) The student’s authorized instructor must—
(i) Administer the test; and
(ii) At the conclusion of the test, review all incorrect answers with the student before authorizing that student to conduct a solo flight.
(c) Pre-solo flight training. Prior to conducting a solo flight, a student pilot must have:
(1) Received and logged flight training for the maneuvers and procedures of this section that are appropriate to the make and model of aircraft to be flown; and
(2) Demonstrated satisfactory proficiency and safety, as judged by an authorized instructor, on the maneuvers and procedures required by this section in the make and model of aircraft or similar make and model of aircraft to be flown.

(d) Maneuvers and procedures for pre-solo flight training in a single-engine airplane. A student pilot who is receiving training for a single-engine airplane rating or privileges must receive and log flight training for the following maneuvers and procedures:

(1) Proper flight preparation procedures, including preflight planning and preparation, powerplant operation, and aircraft systems;
(2) Taxiing or surface operations, including runups;
(3) Takeoffs and landings, including normal and crosswind;
(4) Straight and level flight, and turns in both directions;
(5) Climbs and climbing turns;
(6) Airport traffic patterns, including entry and departure procedures;
(7) Collision avoidance, windshear avoidance, and wake turbulence avoidance;
(8) Descents, with and without turns, using high and low drag configurations;
(9) Flight at various airspeeds from cruise to slow flight;
(10) Stall entries from various flight attitudes and power combinations with recovery initiated at the first indication of a stall, and recovery from a full stall;
(11) Emergency procedures and equipment malfunctions;
(12) Ground reference maneuvers;
(13) Approaches to a landing area with simulated engine malfunctions;
(14) Slips to a landing; and
(15) Go-arounds.

(e) Maneuvers and procedures for pre-solo flight training in a multiengine airplane. A student pilot who is receiving training for a multiengine airplane rating must receive and log flight training for the following maneuvers and procedures:

(1) Proper flight preparation procedures, including preflight planning and preparation, powerplant operation, and aircraft systems;
(2) Taxiing or surface operations, including runups;
(3) Takeoffs and landings, including normal and crosswind;
(4) Straight and level flight, and turns in both directions;
(5) Climbs and climbing turns;
(6) Airport traffic patterns, including entry and departure procedures;
(7) Collision avoidance, windshear avoidance, and wake turbulence avoidance;
(8) Descents, with and without turns, using high and low drag configurations;
(9) Flight at various airspeeds from cruise to slow flight;
(10) Stall entries from various flight attitudes and power combinations with recovery initiated at the first indication of a stall, and recovery from a full stall;
(11) Emergency procedures and equipment malfunctions;
(12) Ground reference maneuvers;
(13) Approaches to a landing area with simulated engine malfunctions; and
(14) Go-arounds.

Student Pilot Training and Limits
Where can I get flying lessons?

Contact any airport that handles private aircraft or the nearest FAA Flight Standards District Office.

Does my pilot training include a written test?

Yes. Before flying solo, you must be familiar with some of the FAA’s rules and with the flight characteristics and operational limitations of the make and model of the aircraft you will fly. Your flight instructor will give you some materials to study, and then test your knowledge. If you pass, your instructor will endorse your student pilot’s certificate for solo flight. The endorsement means that your instructor thinks you are competent to make solo flights.

When do I have to get the endorsement?

Within 90 days of your first solo flight.

After I’ve soloed, can I fly cross-country alone?

Not right away. Your instructor must review your pre-flight planning and preparation for solo cross-country flight and determine that the flight can be made safely under known circumstances and conditions. The instructor must also endorse your logbook before cross- country flight stating you are considered competent to make the flight. [Note: The relevance of the following sentence is not clear.]Under certain conditions, an instructor may authorize repeated solo flights over a given route.

As a student pilot, can I carry passengers with me before getting my recreational or private pilot’s certificate?

No.

Must I have an FCC radiotelephone operator’s permit to operate an aircraft radio transmitter?

No.

What is the difference between a recreational pilot’s certificate and a private pilot’s certificate?

As a recreational pilot, you have to fly within 50 nautical miles of the airport where you learned to fly, you have to fly during the day, and you can’t fly in airspace where communications with air traffic control are required. A private pilot doesn’t have these limitations. It usually takes fewer lessons to get a recreational pilot’s certificate than a private pilot’s certificate. Source

Pilot Training At Aviator Flight School

Founded in 1982 Aviator Flight School offered opportunities to students looking to receive training to fulfill the specialized demands of the airline industry. The Aviator Flight School moved from Addison, Texas to its current location at the Fort Pierce, Florida, campus in 1999.The school has continued to grow and evolve. In 2009 Aviator became a college and expanded into the current 77,500 sq. ft. campus.

Since 1982, when the first students signed up for training, students at the Aviator Flight School have earned more than 20,000 FAA Licenses. From the beginning, Aviator has been committed to excellence in education. The majority of our graduate pilots are flying professionally in the U.S. and around the world.

Today we operate a fleet of more than 30 aircraft that fly over 30,000 hours yearly. As the Flight School advances and the alumni increase, the college remains focused on developing leaders and professionals in the aviation industry.

Schedule a visit

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