Home > Uncategorized > With Pilots and Aviation Mechanics Shortages The Future for Aviation Career is Optimistic

With Pilots and Aviation Mechanics Shortages The Future for Aviation Career is Optimistic

With Pilots and Aviation Mechanics Shortages The Future for Aviation Career is OptimisticYoung people with a dream to fly or fix airplanes can look to a brighter future in an exciting and challenging field. For some time now, aviation professionals have worried privately that turbulence in the aviation industry – with layoffs, furloughs, wage and benefit cuts affecting wide-swaths of the industry – was going to result in too few men and women choosing to become pilots and mechanics. Combined with a predicted global growth in aviation, the decrease in the numbers of trainees – both civilian and military – is creating what many see as a looming shortage of both pilots and mechanics.

Career In Aviation

Apart from piloting aircraft, the study of aviation science encompasses air traffic control, maintenance of aircrafts and related facilities, flight operations, dispatch operations and communications. Professionally trained pilots often enroll in aviation science degree programs to refresh or deepen their understanding of aeronautics. During a degree program in aviation, you can develop a set of diverse interests that will support your quest for a fulfilling career. Aviation colleges typically offer certification programs as well as a degree oriented programs. Degrees are available at the associate’, bachelor’s and masters level, and are typically given in the sciences. Which degrees are being offered typically depends on the job being pursued and/or the college.

What Aviation College Teaches You

Professional pilots today are “flight managers” who must intimately understand the workings of their computerized and fly-by-wire stick and rudder, and who must work with and depend on a crew of professionals that goes far beyond those in the cockpit.

These are the essential skills students learn and practice in today’s collegiate aviation programs, but the value of a college education goes beyond these aviation-specific skills. Typically, your first two years of college will be devoted to “general education” classes. While they seemingly have no direct correlation with aviation, they do, and additionally, they’ll make you a well-rounded individual.

Math, physics, and computer-science classes help you understand your career’s technical aspects. English makes you a better oral and written communicator. Sociology and psychology give you a better understanding of human nature. History and the humanities give you insight and appreciation for man’s development, achievements, and blunders. Economics makes clear the forces that will act upon your career.

Those aiming for the cockpit should never forget that a failed medical (or a failed airline) can terminate a flying career without notice. This is another reason pilots should know more than just how to fly. If you don’t have a degree, your career options are limited. But if you’ve been educated as a manager, engineer, or technician, you have career alternatives that will enable you to survive professionally and, perhaps, maintain your aviation “connection.”

Start Your Aviation Career With Associate Degree

For students interested in flying, an associates degree is the way to go because it’s the minimum most airlines look for when hiring. While you’ll need to complete at least 250 hours in-flight, the Aviation major also includes classroom instruction in FAA regulations, aviation meteorology, aircraft operations and more. Associates degrees are also available for students who prefer to stay on the ground with careers in air traffic control and airport management.
Some professions legally require certification, which is usually granted by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Most jobs in the field of aviation do not require a degree, but many employers prefer to hire applicants who have completed some form of higher education.

Job Options for Graduates of Aviation Colleges

The most basic training offered at aviation colleges is flight lessons, which teach students the skills necessary to become a pilot, copilot, or flight engineer. Students can learn to fly aircrafts of all sizes, from helicopters to commercial jets, and to handle a plane in the scariest of conditions. There are also job and training options for those who are fascinated by airplanes but dont enjoy flying. Students can train in field such as aviation safety and management, airport management, or air traffic control.

Finding the right aviation college can take on you on an important journey in your aviation career. Do your research, ask attending students, get advise from pilots and pilot associations.

2-Year Associate’s Degrees in Aviation from Aviator College

Jump Start Your Career With Flight Training and an A.S. Degree from Aviator College 565 Flight Hours. Aviator College of Aeronautical Science & Technology provides the most cost effective flight training programs and a two year Aviation degree in Aeronautical Science. The College has a state of the art 37,000 square foot facility, featuring a CRJ Level 5 Flight Training Device (Simulator). College student’s receive a minimum of 565 flight training hours in the aviation degree program. Graduates will have the opportunity to stay on as a flight training instructor.

Contact our Recruiting Department today to get detailed information on Aviation Degree in Aeronautical Science.

ENROLL NOW FOR FALL CLASSES

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