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New Pilot Qualifications Raised. Is Your Flight Training Up To New Standards?

New Pilot Qualifications Raised. Is Your Flight Training Up To New Standards?

FAA Boosts Aviation Safety with New Pilot Qualification Standards

WASHINGTON, July 10, 2013– In a final rule to be published soon, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announced today that it is increasing the qualification requirements for first officers who fly for U.S. passenger and cargo airlines.

The rule requires first officers – also known as co-pilots – to hold an Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) certificate, requiring 1,500 hours total time as a pilot. Previously, first officers were required to have only a commercial pilot certificate, which requires 250 hours of flight time.

The rule also requires first officers to have an aircraft type rating, which involves additional training and testing specific to the airplanes they fly.

“Safety will be my overriding priority as Secretary, so I am especially pleased to mark my first week by announcing a rule that will help us maintain our unparalleled safety record,” said Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. “We owe it to the traveling public to have only the most qualified and best trained pilots.”

The new regulations stem in part from the tragic crash of Colgan Air 3407 in February 2009, and address a Congressional mandate in the Airline Safety and Federal Aviation Administration Extension Act of 2010 to ensure that both pilots and co-pilots receive the ATP certification. Today’s rule is one of several rulemakings required by the Act, including the new flight duty and rest requirements for pilots that were finalized in December 2011, and new training requirements expected this fall for air carrier training programs to ensure pilots know how to react properly in difficult operating environments.

“The rule gives first officers a stronger foundation of aeronautical knowledge and experience before they fly for an air carrier,” said FAA Administrator Michael Huerta. “With this rule and our efforts to address pilot fatigue – both initiatives championed by the families of Colgan flight 3407 – we’re making a safe system even safer.”

Other highlights of the rule include:
A requirement for a pilot to have a minimum of 1,000 flight hours as a co-pilot in air carrier operations prior to serving as a captain for a U.S. airline.
Enhanced training requirements for an ATP certificate, including 50 hours of multi-engine flight experience and completion of a new FAA-approved training program.

An allowance for pilots with fewer than 1,500 hours of flight time or who have not reached the minimum age of 23 to obtain a “restricted privileges” ATP certificate. A restricted privileges ATP certificate allows a pilot to serve as a co-pilot until he or she obtains the necessary 1,500 hours.
The options are:

  • Military pilots with 750 hours total time as a pilot;
  • Graduates holding a Bachelor’s degree with an aviation major with 1,000 hours total time as a pilot;
  • Graduates holding an Associate’s degree with an aviation major with 1,250 hours;
  • Pilots who are at least 21 years old with 1,500 flight hours.
  • The rule is consistent with the Airline Safety and Federal Aviation Administration Extension Act of 2010. The rule addresses recommendations from an Aviation Rulemaking Committee, the National Transportation Safety Board, and the FAA’s Call to Action to improve airline safety. Source
WINGS – Pilot Proficiency Program

The objective of the WINGS Program is to address the primary accident causal factors that continue to plague the general aviation community. By focusing on this objective, we hope to reduce the number of accidents we see each year for the same causes. As you will see, it is not a simple “Award” program but is instead a true proficiency program, designed to help improve our skills and knowledge as pilots.

The WINGS – Pilot Proficiency Program is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.

You select (in your Airman Profile) the category and class of aircraft in which you wish to receive training and in which you wish to demonstrate your flight proficiency. Requirements for each aircraft category and class include specific subjects and flight maneuvers. To ensure you receive a well-rounded learning experience, only certain flight activities fulfill specific credit requirements. More information about how these subject areas are selected is available on your MY WINGS page.

The program encourages an on-going training program that provides you an opportunity to fly on a regular basis with an authorized flight instructor. The program is most effective if the training is accomplished regularly throughout the year, thus affording you the opportunity to fly in different seasons and in different flight conditions.
Reviewing and refreshing your knowledge is just as important as actual flying. To meet this goal, we provide you many opportunities to complete online courses, attend seminars and other events, and participate in webinars. Many 3rd party activities, such as those offered by AOPA, ASA, Sporty’s, Gleim Publications, and others, qualify for WINGS credit and will indicate such credit on their web site.

In almost all cases, arrangements have been made with the FAASTeam to automatically provide WINGS credit after the activity. However, please allow at least 24 hours before inquiring about WINGS credits. Remember, if you have questions about a course or activity, check with the provider. If you have a question about the WINGS Program, contact faasafety@faa.gov. Source and Full details here.

Professional Pilot Program & Commercial Pilot Program At Aviator Flight Training Academy

The programs at Aviator Flight School Academy are designed to provide what the airline industry demands of future commercial pilots. The training you will receive at Aviator is one of the most intensive and challenging programs offered in aviation flight training today.

During your flight training you will fly a total of 259 hours, of which 200 hours will be in a multi-engine aircraft. No flight simulators are used for total flight time. The ground school portion is in a structured classroom environment.
You will receive a minimum of 643 instructional hours for the Professional Pilot Program. 484 instructional hours for the Commercial Pilot Program. The instructional hours includes all ground and flight training. 6 months of housing is included in the program. If you come with a PPL 5 months will be included. Commercial Pilot program includes 4 months of housing, if you come with a PPL 3 months will be included.

Contact Aviator
Commercial Special

Distributed by Viestly

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