Home > Uncategorized > Tips on Finding Flight School For Your Flight Training

Tips on Finding Flight School For Your Flight Training

Tips on Finding Flight School For Your Flight TrainingLearning to fly is a passion for many. To take advantage of aviation’s rewards, you must make sure you get the good, solid information and aviation training that you’ll need to be a safe, confident pilot in the air. One of the most important steps in that process is finding the right flight school.

Visiting Flight School

You are only as good as the foundation you create. Before beginning any sort of flight training you really need to do some homework on flight schools you would like to attend. As suggested and recommended by many,
the best way to ‘interview’ any potential flight school is to visit the school in person. Talk with the instructors and students, and then most importantly ask to see the maintenance hangar. What you see in the hangar is most likely an accurate clue to how the company is run. Is the hangar clean/ picked up? Do the mechanics take pride in their jobs? If you are comfortable with what you have discovered, then move forward.

FAA Regulated Part 141 Flight Schools

The flight schools that operate under FAA Regulations Part 141 should be given high consideration.
Flight schools come in two flavors, Part 61 and Part 141, which refer to the parts of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) under which they operate. The most common and least important distinction between them is the minimum flight time required for the private pilot certificate (sometimes called a pilot license)—40 hours under Part 61, and 35 hours under Part 141.

Considering that the national average for earning a private pilot certificate is 60-75 hours (how long you’ll take will depend on your ability and flying frequency), this difference isn’t important for initial pilot training. It does make a difference to commercial pilot applicants: Part 61 requires 250 hours, and Part 141 requires 190.

What differentiates the two is structure and accountability. Part 141 schools are periodically audited by the FAA and must have detailed, FAA-approved course outlines and meet student pilot performance rates. Part 61 schools don’t have the same paperwork and accountability requirements.

Learning under Part 61 rules can often give students the flexibility to rearrange flying lesson content and sequence to meet their needs, which can be of benefit to part-time students. Many Part 141 schools also train students under Part 61 rules.

Flight School Instructors Evaluation

A good flight instructor is important because your life will depend on what he or she teaches you. Don’t hesitate to ask questions about the training and experience of the flight instructors. You might ask what the average flight time is and what the pass/fail rate is among the instructors. (A pass rate of 100 percent doesn’t indicate good instruction.) You might also talk to some of the other students at the school to ask about their flight instructors.
Your primary instructor should be at least a certificated flight instructor (CFI). Ensure that your instrument instructor has an instrument instructor rating (CFII). Instrument training received from a non-rated instructor can cause problems when it comes to meeting FAA requirements.

A good way to get acquainted with your flight instructor is to take an introductory flying lesson (not just a demonstration ride). During your lesson, assess your instructor’s attitude. Only you can determine what personality best fits yours, but you want an instructor who expects perfection, who will work with you until it’s achieved, and who cares about you as a person as well as a student.

Networking

AOPA Flight Training magazine has prepared the following general guidance information. It is intended as an aid for anyone interested in learning to fly and for selecting the aviation training organization that will meet the individual’s specific needs. Without any aviation experience on which to base your decision, selecting a good flight school can be a formidable task. Aviation is procedural and not well suited to impatience. Whether you’re flying an airplane or picking a school, making rash, hurried decisions can have negative consequences. Checklists are an aviation mainstay that ensure all procedures are accomplished and, therefore, make for safe flights. This same procedure can be applied to selecting a good flight school. Another way to educate yourself on aviation industry and get a professional opinion is to talk to pilots or visit their blogs.

Cost

Compared with most of your current activities, learning to fly and earning your pilot certificate (sometimes called a pilot license) may be expensive. But remember, you’re investing in your education, in skills that will open new worlds and opportunities. Flying is an activity of purpose, productivity, and pleasure. It’s also a never-ending learning process and as with all education, your initial pilot training provides the foundation for all that will follow.

Aviation Degree

Aviation colleges typically offer certification programs as well as a degree oriented programs. Degrees are available at the associate’, bachelor’s and masters level, and are typically given in the sciences. Which degrees are being offered typically depends on the job being pursued and/or the college.

For students interested in flying, an associates degree is the way to go because it’s the minimum most airlines look for when hiring. While you’ll need to complete at least 250 hours in-flight, the Aviation major also includes classroom instruction in FAA regulations, aviation meteorology, aircraft operations and more. Associates degrees are also available for students who prefer to stay on the ground with careers in air traffic control and airport management.

Some professions legally require certification, which is usually granted by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Most jobs in the field of aviation do not require a degree, but many employers prefer to hire applicants who have completed some form of higher education.

Flight Schools In Florida

Location is very important when you are looking for a flight training school. Florida is a great place to earn your wings. The moderate and mild climate makes flight training a pleasure. The good weather allows you to log more flying hours faster, get your degree quicker and be on the way sooner to your new aviation career. Ft. Pierce is a small city with friendly people – without congested traffic on the ground or in the air.

Before spending thousands of dollars on your college education and flight training, we recommend you come and visit us here at the Aviator. The tour will consist of visiting with our flight instructors and students, a tour of the maintenance facility, the airplanes and our housing. We will also schedule for you to ride along on one of our training flights.

For further information and to make reservations, please feel free to contact Admissions at 772-466-4822.

SCHEDULE A VISIT
ONLINE ENROLLMENT
CONTACT SCHOOL

Distributed by Viestly

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