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Pilot Training in USA

Pilot Training in USAA commercial aviation license is one of the most coveted and sacred certificates you can receive. The benefits and privileges are great and the responsibilities are enormous. Acquiring a license can be a formidable task. There are the three basic categories you need to know: aeronautical knowledge, flight proficiency and aeronautical experience.

Pilot Training-Aeronautical Knowledge

A person who applies for a commercial pilot certificate must receive and log ground training from an authorized instructor on knowledge that applies to the aircraft category and class rating sought. This includes applicable Federal Aviation regulations, accident reporting requirements of the National Transportation Safety Board, basic aerodynamics and the principles of flight, meteorology including the recognition of critical weather situations, safe and efficient operation of aircraft, principles and functions of aircraft systems, maneuvers, procedures, and emergency operations appropriate to the aircraft, night and high-altitude operations, procedures for operating within the National Airspace System – and other important topics.

Pilot Training-Flight Proficiency

This includes preflight preparation, airport operations, takeoffs, landings and go-around, performance maneuvers, ground reference maneuvers, navigation, slow flight and stalls, emergency operations, high-altitude operations, and post-flight procedures.

Pilot Training-Aeronautical Experience

A person who applies for a commercial pilot certificate must log at least 250 hours of flight time as a pilot that consists of at least – 100 hours in powered aircraft, 100 hours of pilot-in-command flight time and 50 hours in cross-country flight of which at least 10 hours must be in airplanes.

Pilot Certification in the United States

Obtaining pilot certification in the United States is a complex series of tests and requirements. It is administered by FARs (or Federal Aviation Regulations) that are established by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA.) The FAA governs all aviation activities in the United States like pilot training activities, airplane design, airline flights, hot-air ballooning, man-made structure heights and even model rocket launches and model aircraft operation.
All pilot certificates and ratings require a practical test which is usually referred to as a “check ride.” For each practical test, the FAA has published a Practical Test Standards document which is expected to be used by the applicant, the flight instructor and the examiner. A practical test is administered by an FAA Inspector or an FAA Designated Pilot Examiner. The check-ride is divided into two parts:

  1. The oral exam
  2. The flight test in the aircraft

After the student has successfully completed the practical test, the examiner will issue a temporary airman certificate with the new license or rating. In order to take practical tests for all pilot certificates and ratings, the applicant must have proper logbook endorsements from their flight instructor.
Thomas F. Sullivan offers a great overview of the steps needed in order to become a certified Private Pilot.

Thomas F. Sullivan offers the steps needed to become a pilot by training at one of the many flight schools in America. Lets take a look at the steps which are needed in order to become a certified Private Pilot.

  1. The first step is a psychological step. You need to make sure you are in the proper mind set and have the proper attitude to learn how to fly. This means you should have a very good reason, at least for yourself, in terms of why you want to become a pilot. And a perfunctory reason will not work. The reason for this is because it takes unadulterated commitment on your part in order to gain a Private Pilot License.
  2. Along the lines of commitment, you will need to set aside a large chunk of time weekly for learning how to fly. You could just train on the weekend, but the draw back to this method is that learning to fly could take a long time, a very long time. Therefore, if possible, try to fly every good weather day, and therefore set aside time daily for flight training. It is very important you understand that the closer your lessons are to each other, the less money you will spend in the end. The national average in terms of the flying hours needed to obtain the Private Pilot License is 65 – 70 hours.
  3. Plan on spending around $8,000.00 USD to obtain the Private Pilot License. This includes instructor fee, cost to rent airplane, exams, books, and equipment. Some sources put the cost at about $7,000.00 USD. Again, the more frequently you fly, the lower the end cost will be. Assuming you are average in terms of number of flying hours needed (65 – 70 hours), plan on spending $7,000.00 to $8,000.00 USD.
  4. After you have decided that you truly want to gain a Private Pilot License, you understand the time needed, and you have worked out the financial aspect, you then can start to think about selecting the right flight school. When selecting a flight school, visit every flight school that is within a reasonable driving distance to where you live. The following two steps will help in your selection of a flight school.
  5. You need to decide if you want to become a tri-gear or conventional gear (tail wheel) pilot, or both. Do you want to take your check ride in a conventional gear airplane, or a tri-gear airplane. Today, most pilots take their check ride in a tri-gear airplane. But it should be noted that you will be a more proficient and a safer pilot if you are able to fly more then one type of airplane. This diversity includes being able to fly both tri-gear and conventional gear aircraft.Today, most pilots prefer to stick with a tri-gear airplane from start to finish, when getting their Private Pilot License. Select a flight school which provides both tri-gear and conventional gear aircraft for you to rent, so that you are able to fly both of these types of airplanes.You can train and take your check ride in a tri gear airplane, and later after you obtain your Private Pilot License, get a tail wheel endorsement. No matter how you slice it, the more different types of airplanes you can get checked out in and fly well, the safer you will be as a pilot.
  6. Also, in terms of flight school selection, you need to decide if you want to learn to fly at a FAR Part 141 school, or a FAR Part 61 school. In the United States, flight schools are required to operate under one of these two sets of rules, as laid down by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration). One is really not any better then the other. Flight schools which operate under FAR Part 141 provide a more formal curriculum, with slightly fewer hours required for certification, and flight schools which operate under FAR Part 61 are less formal, and hours needed for certification are a little bit more.But since the hours needed in order to obtain the Private Pilot License almost always is much more then the required hours for certification (65-70 hours is the national average), there is really no advantage to learning at a FAR Part 141 school. Your decision in terms of FAR Part 141, and FAR Part 61, should really be dependent on the type of learning environment you prefer. Some students do better in a more formal environment, while others prefer a more laid back, less formal environment.
  7. After selecting a flight school, you then need to select an instructor. Select an instructor you feel comfortable with, both in terms of personality and flying experience. There are basically two types of instructors in the United States. One type is trying to build flying hours and has a desire to move on beyond instruction to a commercial flying job which is more lucrative. The other type of instructor is a career instructor who prefers to instruct, and is not really flying to build hours, but enjoys teaching new students. Career instructors on average tend to be older then hour building instructors. In terms of these two types of instructors, one is really not any better then the other, and selecting an instructor you believe you are compatible with is what really is important. You need to have a professional learning situation, where personality incompatibility will not interfere with the process of becoming a pilot. Selecting the right instructor is probably the most important component in learning how to fly.
  8. Finally, for most areas of the United States, plan on starting the learning process at the beginning of the summer. You need to have plenty of good flying weather in front of you before you start. If you start in the fall, you may end up having to stop due to bad weather and may need to wait until the spring to continue, which means more time and money. Plan on getting the job done within a few months in the summer. This holds true for most areas of the country, but not all. Of course, if you are learning to fly in the Southwest or Florida, then when you start is really not a factor.

Distributed by Viestly

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